WITH ALAN CLAYTON OF THE DIRTY STRANGERS: “I WRITE BETTER WITH MY BACK AGAINST THE WALL”

Standard

Original article (in Spanish) published in Revista Madhouse on August 13, 2017

And on the eight day God created The Dirty Strangers. Or something. Because the story of one of the most particular London cult bands of the last three-odd decades actually had to do with earthlier facts. No eighth day of creation, then. God has never taken up the work again, he just had to settle for seven days to do what he could do. Instead came Alan Clayton, singer, guitarist and, most of it all, main man behind the songs of the Shepherd´s Bush band, one of the most cosmopolitan areas of the British capital city.

1..

The Dirty Strangers in the ’80s: Ray King, Dirty Alan Clayton, Mark Harrison, Scotty Mulvey, Paul Fox

Like in a theater programme, to get to know about the days and the times of the Dirtys suggests a brief description of the cast. The first name on the list is irrevocably (again) Clayton, the band´s heart and soul, or as clearly described in the group´s website: “The band were on a mission: carrying a torch for rootsy rock’n’roll as invented by Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent and Chuck Berry but laced with a little bit of Otis Redding soul and a side order of punk attitude” Oh yes. The original cast that spawned the early days of the Dirty Strangers’ biography continues with Jim Callaghan, most remembered as the Rolling Stones’ touring security chief  for at least 30 years, currently retired, who Clayton used to work for when he still hadn´t picked up the music path. Next is former boxer Joe Seabrook, Alan´s close friend, who also did Security for Callaghan before becoming Keith Richards’ (yes, that Keith Richards) personal bodyguard, till he passed away in 2000. There´s also Stash Klossowski De Rola (better known as Prince Stash), an aristocratic dandy all the way from the London ‘60s bohemian scene, one of Brian Jones’ closest mates, whom he was busted with on a historic drug raid in 1967. Last but not least is the very Keith Richards himself (yes, that Keith once again) as prime eventual catalyst, who thanks to all the aforementioned characters ended up being not only the band´s unofficial godfather, but also a very close friend of, of course, Alan Clayton’s. One thing lead to another and, 30 years and four albums later (“The Dirty Strangers”, “West 12 To Wittering (Another West Side Story)”, “Crime And A Woman”, and “Diamonds”, a compilation), the nowadays four-member group (Clayton on vocals and guitar, Scott Mulvey on piano, Cliff Wright on bass and drummer Danny Fury) prepare to record a new album early next year. As they’ve been doing since their early days, in the meantime they´ll keep doing the odd club circuit in England, with 3 gigs in Spain by late September (in Barcelona, Zaragoza and Reus) recently added.

2..

A promo poster of the Dirtys’ self-titled first album, with Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood as guests

NO SLEEP TILL HAMMERSMITH
REVISTA MADHOUSE visited Clayton´s place last November to interview him and go over the band´s history. In order to get to Dirty Alan´s headquarters (which backyard includes an intimate and tiny personal recording studio) one needs to reach the Hammersmith and Fulham Borough, in West London, not far from the legendary Wormwood Scrubs prison, which involved a truly funny question after asking a local lady about the right directions in order to get there by mentioning the traditional jail (“Oh, your friend lives there?”) Along with Alan was bandmate Danny Fury (once drummer of the Lords of the New Church, among other great bands he was in), whom we´ll soon feature an exclusive interview with too. So here´s a smooth (and sometimes also wild) ride about the lives and times of the Dirty Strangers in the very own words of its creator, a rock’n’roll task that took him longer than, rather more than, seven days.

3..

Clayton, Wright and Mulvey, on a recent show

The Dirtys were born in the mid-80’s but what before that, I mean, personally, as a musician?Alan: The band formed in ’78. I mean, I started playing guitar I suppose in ’76, something about that I used to write songs and poetry. Because most of the people think that when I met Keith, that’s where the band started. And the reason why I met Keith is because we were very successful. The Lords of the New Church were a big band, and the Dirtys had their own scene playing the Marquee. Your career moves very fast when you´re young.  And about three years before I met Keith, I met him in ’81, we had already headlined the Marquee.

So what´s the story behind you getting to meet Keith? How did that really happen?
Alan: I was the Jack of all trades, and one of my jobs was, like, Security. Joe Seabrook was one of my best mates, I knew Joe before he met Keith. My first day with Keith was in Big Joe´s pub.

4..

The Verulam Arms, Joe Seabrook´s former pub in Warford

Joe had a pub?
Alan: Yeah, in Watford, called The Verulam Arms.

Watford? That’s Elton John’s hometown, isn’t it? That’s close to where I’m staying now, in Hemel Hempstead.
Alan: Right, very close. In fact Joe had a place in Hemel Hempstead as well.

So Joe was doing Security at the time.
Alan: Yeah, he had a pub, and he was doing Security, and we became good friends. He was the Stranglers’ bodyguard, Big Country’s bodyguard…

Then how did you meet Jim Callaghan?
Alan: Jim and Paddy was the one I worked for, it was a firm called Call A Hand.  So I worked for Paddy and Jim, and Joe came to work for Paddy and Jim as well. Because of Joe’s immense stature and presence, he became a bodyguard as well.

5..

Keith Richards and Alan in the early ’80s: friendship and guitars

He was a boxer, wasn’t he?Alan: Yeah, he was.

So you were doing Security on your own.
Alan: Yeah, working for Jimmy, for Jimmy Callaghan.

And then I guess you met Keith through Joe…
Alan: Yeah. And because I had this musical connection with Joe, when Joe started working for Keith, he wanted Keith to hear our music, ’cause he knew Keith would like it. Carlton Towers in Knightsbridge. He took me out to meet Keith. And it was funny because he brought me into his bedroom. I arrived at the hotel 11 in the evening, so I was working during the day.  And I said “when are we going to see him?”, and Joe said, “he doesn’t get up until 2 in the morning”. Fuck it! I’d been at work all day!

How did you feel about that at the time? Were you somehow excited? I guess you’ve always liked Keith as a guitar player…
Alan: Of course I was excited! I had other people I preferred but I liked the stuff he likes, Otis Redding, Motown…The Stones were always a band I liked, but I liked The Who more, as they were always more of a London band for me. So that’s how I met him. I remember I went into his bedroom in the Carlton Towers, and Joe said “this is Alan, he plays in a band that sounds like the Stones used to sound” And Keith said “look forward to that, it’s been a while” And two days later he’d say to me “I’m off to Paris now”, and I said “oh I’d never been to Paris”, so he sent his chauffeur around asked me to take a guitar and swordstick and said “come and stay with me in Paris”. And I’d only known him for 2 days, you know.

Just like that.
Alan: His chauffeur turned up in Keith’s Bentley. Picked me up and drove to Paris. His dad Bert was still living in Dartford, where Keith came from, so on our way to Dover, he picks up Bert. So that’s me and Bert in the Bentley, we went to Paris.

6..

Keith and Alan in recent times: friendship and sofas

The three of you.
Alan: Well, Keith was flying there. Just me, Bert and the chauffeur.

That must have been a great ride!
Alan: Oh it was good!

Great story, and great way to start as well!
Alan: But I’d already been in the studio with Ronnie (Wood). We’d done “Baby” and “Here She Comes”, and “Easy To Please”.

And that’s on your first album.
Alan: Yeah, right. And then “Thrill Of A Thrill” So I’d already been recording with Ronnie, and Keith helped set up shows in Paris. We still never had a record deal, and it was only a couple of years later when Mick (Jagger) was doing his solo album, and all sort of fell into place.

And all because of Joe, right?
Alan: Yeah yeah. Joe was a major part of my career, because the first live shows we’ve ever done was in his pub. But before that I was working for Jimmy Callaghan doing Security. I worked at the Stones’ concerts Earl’s Court in ’76. I had lots of strange jobs from Jimmy. I used to clear out brothels. That’s a house with prostitutes.

Where was that?
Alan: In Soho. And then I used to work for Jimmy, and clear out those brothels.

Yes, Jim used to be very nice with me in the USA in ’94 while I followed the tour, very helpful.
Alan: He’s a lovely man. It was through Joe that I met Keith, but Jimmy was my first friend.

7..

The Ruts. Paul Fox is holding a beer can.

STRANGERS IN AMERICA
Alan, I want to ask you about Paul Fox, who was formerly with the Ruts, but he was an early member of the Dirty Strangers, in the first line-up, wasn´t he?
Alan: Not in the first line-up of the band, but in the first one who went to America. And he also played on the first album, but it was Alistair Simmons, who also played in the Lords of the New Church. He wrote “Baby”, “Running Slow”…There are still songs I’m doing that I wrote with him. And when Alistair left the Dirty Strangers, he joined the Lords of the New Church. Lovely and fantastic bloke, but couldn’t keep it together all the time, you know. As for Paul Fox, it was funny, because when Malcolm Owen, the singer…You know about The Ruts, don’t you?

A little bit…
Alan: The Ruts were gonna tour with The Who, but Malcolm was a junkie, and he fuckin’ had to cancel a tour with The Who. It was a real unfortunate ending for him. When I used to work doing Security, I’d seen The Ruts and I thought “I could be a singer in this band” They came from West London as well, so there was a bit of a connection there. And 3 or 4 years later I’m in the back of this cinema in Kensal Rise in London, trying to get a gig in this old cinema, it’s not there anymore. And Paul Fox was there and he said “you really remind me of my old singer” And I said “you know what, when your singer died, I was gonna fuckin’ apply for the job” And then he said “I wish you had”, ‘cause after Malcolm died, The Ruts went in a complete different direction. And I got to know him. He had got on stage with us for a couple of gigs. He was a new friend I had found I really liked. And two weeks before we were gonna tour America Alistair fucked up. We had just got a manager and this tour would cost him a lot of money. And Alistair was always on that edge of being brilliant or fuckin’ terrible. The last gig for the Hells Angels, you know.  He was so out of it he couldn’t play his guitar. And my manager said “I’m not paying the money to take him to America” All the temptations he would be offered over there…

Huty21393 021

Oh yeah: More Dirtys, early days

So he wasn’t part of it.
Alan: No. it was a big decision. He was my best friend. We sacked him two weeks before they toured America. It was one of our goals. So I rang Paul Fox up and asked him to do the tour. And then he joined the band.

How was that American tour?
Alan: We only toured the East Coast. It wasn’t actually a tour, it lasted for seven days or something.

All small venues?
Alan: Well, we played the Cat Club in New York, which is a big one. And places around New York, you know. Boston, etc.

So that was the first time the Dirtys played there.
Alan: Yeah. We didn’t have a record deal then either.

And that was before you met Ronnie.
Alan: No, I’d met Ronnie! A couple of years before.

Ok you had already recorded the songs, but you didn’t have a record deal yet.
Alan: Yeah. We recorded with Ronnie, and then we recorded with Keith. Mick had bought his solo album out. That’s how Keith had the time.

9..

And then one day the Dirtys met Ronnie Wood…

The album was produced by Prince Stash, but how did he get into the scene?
Alan: You know, Stash got busted with Brian Jones. When Keith came to the studio to record with us, Stash was with him. If you see that photograph…There´s a photo with all of us in the studio with Keith and Stash. And afterwards Stash said “who is bringing the record out?” So he formed Thrill Records after “Thrill of a Thrill”, the first song on the album. So he formed the label and dedicated a year of his life. I mean, it got released worldwide, and it done well. It all seemed so easy at the time, but now you say “fuck I would love to have that now”, you know. And he put money into it, he was great. I have some great stories about him. Do you remember Pinnacle, the distribution company for independent record companies. When you went down there you had 20 minutes to state your case, 45 minutes later Stash is still telling them what a fantastic album it was…

So everything just clicked.
Alan: It did, but when we were in America it all started to go wrong. What happened was that in Britain we sold a lot of albums, and when Stash took it to America they used Keith’s name as an advertisement. Keith played with us before he did his first solo album. And when he started his first solo album, which was a big deal at the time, it was in his contract that he wasn’t on any other albums, and Jane Rose (Keith´s manager) always said “when Keith records with friends, it’s best to let the people find out about Keith playing on it otherwise it could go wrong”. So in America Stash added a sticker on the cover of the album saying “The Dirty Strangers featuring Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood” And Keith was just about to release his solo album exclusive, and so our album got banned in America. And I understand why it wasn’t smart how they advertised it in America. So everyone just fucking used his name as if it was an advertising tool.

10..Was it Stash the one who came up with the idea of putting on the sticker on the album?
Alan: Oh yeah, that must have been Stash, yeah. Keith played on that as a friend.

Changing the subject now…A few years ago you worked with John Sinclair, who used to manage the MC5, and also an activist.
Alan: Not just the manager, he was the inspiration, he was a lot more to it.

That´s right, in fact he was one of the founders of the White Panther Party. But hen again, you worked with him in his “Beatnik Youth album in 2012. I saw that video on YouTube that…
Alan:
Oh but that’s different to “Beatnik Youth” Well, you know, John Sinclair and the MC5. I didn’t come across him, really. My knowledge of MC5 came from Brian James. And I got a phone call from George Butler, the drummer before Danny in the band, and he went “I got a friend of mine, Tim, from Brighton, who would like to do recording with John Sinclair. Can we do some recording in the studio” And I said “yeah, of course” So John Sinclair came over. I found out about him, I was intrigued about him…And he came over and, like when I met Keith, it was almost the same, I instantly bonded with John. I thought “another kindred spirit!”

11..

John Sinclair, a legend in b&w

Yeah, he came a long way.
Alan: Yeah, he’s been around. And at the time of “West 12 to Wittering”, Youth produced some of it. You know “She’s a Real Boticelli”, the single…

Oh I love that song! That’s one of my favourites.
Alan: If you asked me how I wrote that…Youth produced the single, A Youth mix. You know Youth, he produced The Verve. He was the bass player in Killing Joke. He’s fine when producing. He’d done The Verve, he’s got a band with Paul McCartney. He’s a really great bloke. Told him that I had met John Sinclair, and he produced “Lock and Key”, and he said “why don’t we do an album?” So we wrote an album.
Danny: That’s cool.
Alan: Yeah. It’s waiting to come out as well. Fuck it, it’s a fantastic album! The sort of music I’ve never really been involved into, ‘cause Youth comes from different areas. We’ve known each other for a long time. And John Sinclair, that was it. ‘Cause John was going around Europe playing, he lives in Amsterdam now, and he’d be picking up these generic bar bands that would be in a bar, and they would just played blues, and he’d do his bit of poetry over it. What me and Youth wanted to do was taking it to song level, so he had an album with actual songs, not just generic blues with beat of poetry. So we used his beat poetry as the verses, and we got choruses. So he turned them into songs.

Would you say you were part of the London punk scene, or was it general rock’n’roll?
Alan:
No, I came after with the Dirty Strangers. When Punk was going, I loved Punk, it was fuckin’ great, ‘cause it took me from being a bloke that only got to play in his bedroom to someone that believed that could form a band. And I really did. And I could always write songs. I could always write poetry and stuff like that, so I loved the punk scene. At the time in 1976, I was 22, and all the punks were pretending to be 16, 17…All the punks like Mick Jones, Tony James, they were my age. 22 or 23. So even when I wasn’t in a band, I knew Mick Jones before he was in The Clash, because I used to work in Shepherd’s Bush’s Hammersmith College of Art’s building, and he was an art student there. His first gig supporting The Kursaal Flyers at the Roundhouse. So I felt connected to the Punk scene because I knew Mick. It was a heavily West London-influenced scene, so I was right in the middle of it anyway. And they were all my age. And about that time I was doing Security at all the concerts, so I’d see all the bands. And I’d say it definitely inspired me to form a rock’n’roll band. All the punk bands I liked were really rock’n’roll bands with a new energy.

You always seemed to me to be deep into ‘50s and ‘60s stuff.
Alan:
Oh I just love rock’n’roll, you know.  What I love more than anything? Seeing women dance when we’re playing…

12..WITTERING HEIGHTS
I’d like to talk a bit about the “West 12 to Wittering” album. Once again, we know that Keith played piano there, and he actually plays in a several songs. So does Ronnie Wood. Plus it’s not only my favourite Dirtys’ album, but one of the few albums that I’m always playing at home ever since I got it. That’s how much I love it.
Alan:
Thank you, thank you very much.

And just a few days ago I was walking down the streets here in London playing it on my iPod, and it’s an album that gives you that perfect London atmosphere…
Alan:
Of course, it’s about London, definitely.

I mean, you don’t play Madonna when you’re walking down in London.
Alan: Hahaha! Yeah, the Dirty Strangers is a good choice. And the story about it is, I’d just done the ‘A Bigger Bang’ tour with the Stones, and the Dirty Strangers hadn’t been going for about 8 years.  I’ve done the ‘A Bigger Bang’ tour for about 2 and a half years, and while I was away I wrote a lot of songs, and when I came back I decided I wanted to get the band back together, but at the time it was only me, John Proctor, and George Butler, just a 3-piece, and we were called Monkey Seed.

You changed the name of the band?
Alan: No. What happened was, the Dirty Strangers were sort of dissolved, we never split up. We’d hadn’t played for too long, not earning any money and, you know people get demotivated. So when I decided to get the band back together, I wanted it to be a fresh start. So I wanted a new name. I wasn’t gonna do any Dirty Strangers songs, only new songs. But I wrote all the Dirty Strangers’ songs anyway. So I went to Ian Grant, which just got Track Records, and I said to him, “I’ve got this album of songs. Do you fancy signing me to Track Records?” He said ye. He likes the stuff I’m doing.  And he said “why are you changing the name?” I said “well, because I want a fresh start” And he said “Alan you’re 50-odd” (laughs) “You’re not twenty anymore!” And he was right! He said “listen, you’ve got all this reputation as the Dirty Strangers, basically you are  the Dirty Strangers. Why would you change the name? It never gone wrong for the Dirty Strangers” So he said, “I advise you to call the band the Dirty Strangers”. And I went “all right” Sometimes you’re happy for people to tell you this stuff, ‘cause you don’t realize it sometimes. You think, “yeah I have a new band, I’m gonna call it this, I’m not gonna do The Dirty Strangers” So we got that together, I told Keith, and he said “do you want me to play guitar on it?”, and I went “no, I’m playing guitar on this one” And I said “can you play piano on it?” And he went “yeah, fuckin’ of course!”, you know. And that’s why it’s called “West 12 to Wittering”, because he lives in Wittering, and I took my recording gear from here (W12), and we set up camp.

13..

Alan Clayton, ex-bass player John Proctor and drummer Danny Fury

Where did you record it?
Alan: In Redlands. His stuff, the piano, was recorded in Redlands.

So you stayed with him at the time there?
Alan: Oh, I stayed with him lots of different times.

It’s beautiful in there, isn’t it?
Alan: Yeah, lovely. So much so, if I moved from London, that’s a part of the world I’m gonna move to.

Small world, two days ago I saw Ian Hunter in Shepherd’s Bush and, as I left, I met this couple who live there.
Alan: Ian Hunter? Did he play Shepherd’s Bush?

Oh yeah. Just 3 days ago. He never played in South America, and he’s not likely to play soon, so I couldn’t miss it. With Graham Parker as support act.
Alan: Oh I love Graham Parker!
Danny: Do they advertise it these days?
Alan: It’s like if it’s sold out, there’s no advertising.

I’m sorry, now I’m starting to feel guilty!
Alan: I didn’t know that he was playing some time.
Danny: If you go to the websites, usually they’re there.
Alan: Usually there would be an ad in the Evening Standard, or in Time-Out.
Danny: In the past it used to be Melody maker, you found all the gigs in there.
Alan: Time-Out for me. Growing up in a band, was the place where they put all the gigs in, and now it’s selected gigs.

DIRTY, STRANGE AND CONCEPTUAL
What about “Crime and a Woman”, the new album? I know it’s a concept album.
Alan:  It’s a story that goes from start to the end, if you want it to be a story. If you want it to be a collection of rock’n’roll songs, it’s a collection of rock’n’roll songs. But there is a story within it probably for my own benefit, more than anybody else’s. It’s a story that goes for it.14..

Yes, you told me it’s an album you wanted to do in a more personal way, after I asked you why Keith isn’t in the album, and you said you wanted it to be “your” album.
Alan: Yeah yeah. Because the thing is, it is great having Keith as one of your best mates, but the downside is once you play your own stuff, whenever anyone comes to see you some are disappointed I’m always getting this continuous question, “Would Keith be playing with you?” or “Would he be turning up?” I understand why more people say that, but it’s not his band. It’s my band that he happens to play in now and then, it is  the Dirty Strangers. And this one, I wanted it to be representative of us live, what we’ve recorded.

Well, I still love the album a lot.
Alan: I love it as well, because it sounds great. “Keith, can you come and play on this?” And he’s great, but he’s not playing live with us.

You’re always writing on your own, you’re the only one that writes the songs for the Dirtys, isn´t it?
Alan: And now I’ve been playing with Danny for a little while. Danny writes songs, and sure he’ll contribute down the line.

But basically all the songs on the new album are yours.
Alan: Yeah, but there’s a couple like “Running Slow” and “Are You Satisfied”, which was co-written with Alistair… He’s been dead for 10 years. He was a good mate of mine. And “One Good Reason” was co-written by Tam Nightingale. And Scotty co-wrote “Short and Sweet” But really, it was my album.

What inspires you to writes songs? Is it everyday life?
Alan: Definitely, everyday life. If I have a lull in my life, like a lot of people I write better with my back against the wall. When I’m comfortable, when everything’s alright, I find it very hard to write songs, ‘cause my life is at peace. Don’t you find that Danny, if there is turmoil in your life, then  you write better songs?
Danny: Yeah!

Then there wouldn’t be any blues players.
Alan: Yeah, exactly.  It’s the hard time that make you dig in and dig deep.

And I believe it’s the same with writers.
Alan: Yeah. Well how many tortured writers and comedians we know? People that are manic depressive, they put this beautiful work out.
Danny: They focus on their inner turmoil.

Somehow you’re exorcising your problems, you know what I mean. It’s therapy.
Alan: That’s definitely right. If I have something strong my mind, I’ll definitely write a song about it.

15..

The Dirty Strangers today. From L-R: Danny Fury, Alan Clayton, Cliff Wright and Scott Mulvey

Out of the lyrics, you don’t find bands like the Dirty Strangers around these days. I mean, all that bluesy lowdown rock’n’roll with a punky edge….And now Danny’s welcome, so that means some fresh new blood.
Alan: Yeah, right!

MAYBE IT´S BECAUSE I´M A LONDONER
What’s your take on the current London music scene?
Alan: You know, can I be honest to you? I don’t give a fuck about the music scene, I only care about the Dirty Strangers. When you’re in a rock and roll band, you can’t care about anybody else. Really, because you fuckin’ love rock’n’roll. Don’t you think that’s right, Danny?
Danny: Yeah, you´re sort of caught up in your own thing, you know. But if I can maybe answer that thing, I’ve got a little different impression anyway, as I’m still a little bit interested in what’s going on. You put new stuff in the context of old so, in a way, if you want to release it to the world, you work. That’s what my interest comes from. It’s actually, like Alan said, it’s a limited customer, you know. But I think there’s a lack of personalities, a lack of true expression, everybody seems to copy something that’s already been done before.

Well, that’s because they’re only after the money.
Alan: Yeah yeah.
Danny: Either it’s music you just make for money, but there’s not much that really reaches and touches, you know what I mean, a genuine expression of a personality.
Alan: Also, I’m still discovering music from the ‘50s, you know how I mean, there is such a body of music out there.
Danny: So much music out there…
Alan: I’d like to know if there’s still music going on, with youngsters. It’s not for me to comment what 15 year olds like, ‘cause I’m not 15 years old, right? But at my own age I know what I do, I play rock’n’roll.  I see many bands compromise, but we never compromise, we just play what we play. During my career I have been really trendy, then forgotten, then trendy again. You just do what you do.

Yes, it’s just like you said, it’s always about going back to the past, there’s so much in there.
Alan:  I listen to the radio a lot, so I don’t shut myself from the outside world. But there’s still people writing great songs. With rock and roll I am very protective, you’ve got bands who toy with rock and roll.
16..As it was just a word…
Alan: Yeah, and I live my life for it. I know I’ve done it for a long time.

So, if I may ask, what do you do for a living out of the Dirty Strangers?
Alan: I’m Danny’s butler! (laughs heavily)

You know, I was just curious…
Alan: He’s from Switzerland. He has loads of money.

You know, people from Switzerland, they’re the rich ones…
Alan:
Of course they are! (laughs) They’re employing us all.
Danny: I have to change his name to James or something… (laughs)

18.. BOB & MARLEY & ALAN & JOHNNY
Alan, there’s a funny story involving you and Bob Marley I’d really like you to tell me about.
Alan:  Of course I’ll do! When I was working for Jimmy Callaghan, in the late ‘70s, and we were working at Crystal Palace’s Bowl, which was an outdoor concert in South London. And at the time the backstage area didn’t have dressing rooms, it was big tents. And it was my job to look after Bob Marley’s tent. Big Joe was there. And what happened, back then, security wasn’t like it is now. The backstage area had low fences all the way round, not a lot of security, so every Jamaican seemed to think it was their right to meet Bob Marley.  So they were jumping over the fence, trying to get in his tent, and I was the only one stopping them.

He was the big thing.
Alan: Of course he was, the big thing for Jamaicans. It was the spiritual man for them, and everything. And the people that were trying getting into his tent didn’t like the fact I might be in the way to stop them, as that was my job, and what happened was there was always commotion going on. And someone tapped me on the shoulder and said, “come in”, pulled me into Bob Marley’s tent. Bob Marley’s sitting on an amp playing guitar, and he rolled this big spliff. And all the time Bob Marley was just playing guitar they got me stoned to calm me down. I was 20 or 25 minutes in there. And then they sent me outside, ‘cause I had calmed down.

Come on, 20 minutes with Bob Marley, that’s a great story!
Alan: Yeah!

Were you into Jamaican music at the time?
Alan: You know, when I was young, my first music was ska. Johnny, my dad, was a teddy boy, so he loved rock and roll. He’s a singer, you know, I’ve done an album with him.

Yeah, I’ve read about that.
Alan:
And Keith’s playing on it, and Bobby Keys. That’s my dad’s album, Johnny Clayton.

Was it released? Or is a personal recording?
Alan:
No it’s not, but it’s gonna be released. Brian James, Keith Richards, Bobby Keys, Jim Jones (of the Jim Jones Revue) and Tyla, all playing with my dad.

19..All studio sessions?
Alan:
Yeah.  But this record, “Crime and a Woman”, we finished recording it at a place called The Convent who ran out of money but had already pressed the CD. Cargo distributed them, which we sell from the Facebook site, from the shop site. That’s the next release, my Dad’s album. The John Sinclair one was already out on another label, and the Dirty Strangers are about to record another album. But before that we’re gonna re-release the first one with all new stuff, outtakes… I think that my dad’s album is gonna be released at the same time of that. There’s only great people on that.


Yeah, great line-up! Can’t wait for that. So are there any new songs, or is it all cover versions?
Alan:
  No, all Dean Martin songs, and Frank Sinatra. So the band is Mallet on drums, Dave Tregunna, he’s bass player on it, Scott Mulvey of the Dirtys is playing piano, and I’m playing acoustic on it, and then we’ve got guest guitarists and a guest saxophone player as well.

Are the Dirtys going to play in other countries, or you’re more London-based?
Alan:
Oh listen, we wanna play everywhere! We have played in Europe. We’re at a new stage with Danny now. We really needed someone to be a bit more at ground level managing us, and Paul my son is doing all that.

He’s very enthusiastic.
Alan: Yes he is, he is his father’s son. So yeah, we want to play everywhere.

As a musician, is there anybody in special you would have liked to play or record with?
Danny:
He really wanted to play with me.
Alan: My dreams are true now, my dreams have come true! I tell you, if it wasn’t Danny (laughs) it would be someone like Otis Redding, he’s my favourite singer of all time. Yes, my favourite singer, end of story.

Oh you’re a soul man.
Alan: Yeah, but my daddy was a teddy boy, so I’d come out this weird mixture.

It’s all the same, it’s all great music, whether it’s soul, rock’n’roll, rhythm and blues. And then all those black guys!
Alan: They can’t speak like me, but I can speak like them! Hahaha!
Danny: They feel it from the heart, I mean, they’ve got that feel. And Alan’s got such a great voice on top of that.
Alan: Thank you! We should stop on a high now… (laughs)

20..y

The article´s author along  Clayton and Fury: The Dirty Three

Just like you said, it’s mostly about going back to the past, that’s when the greatest music was done. Just yesterday I was playing my all-time favourite live album, ‘Jerry Lee Lewis at the Star Club’ in 1964, which is like the wildest album ever. Now that’s real heavy metal. Someone even referred to it saying “it’s not an album, it’s a crime scene”
Alan:  Yeah! I’ll tell you a funny story that Ronnie told me, when he was on tour with Jerry Lee, he’d done a tour with him.  They were both walking through the hotel lobby, and this woman came up and she threw her arms around Jerry Lee, and she went “Jerry Lee, you smell lovely, what you got on?” And he said “I’ve got a hard-on, honey. I didn’t know you could smell it from there!”
Danny:
That’s awesome!
Alan: That’s a great one, isn’t it?

I love those stories! Any other stories you want to tell me?
Alan:
Do you want to know how “She’s a Real Boticelli” got written?

21..I’d love to. So when somebody’s a real Boticelli?
Alan: Well, I’ll tell you what it was, right? I was down at Redlands, and me and Keith were in the kitchen, cooking. I was peeling potatoes and Keith is preparing the meat. In England when you grow up there’s a set of books called “Just William” And the character is a boy about 13, lives in the country, he’s got parents and he’s got a sister, and he’s always having adventures. And everybody who’s English would know about these books. I’m sure every country’s got its own books, but it’s a boy, and he’s in a gang called The Outlaws who have a rival gang. There are all these strange characters who pass through his village. Musicians, tramps, fairground people…And they’re written by a woman. And all my life I was growing up thinking it was a bloke, and it’s a woman, Richmal Compton. So this woman has written all these fantastic boy’s adventures from the perspective of a boy. So we found out that me and Keith liked them, we found out a mutual love when we were growing up. And when the Stones’ office found out our love for the books they sent the books in CD form, so we used to listen to them while we were cooking. And one of them starts “she’s a real Boticelli!”, and actually someone says she’s got a real bottle of cherry, and we misunderstood that, right? I looked to Keith and he said “that’s a fuckin’ Chuck Berry title, isn’t it?” So it’s all from when we were cooking, from his CD, from his book. So we just nicked the first line out, and wrote the whole song “She’s a Real Boticelli”

Great story, and also coming from Redlands, just like “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and the gardener story. Oh you know that…
Alan:
Right!

All right, you know we could be talking for hours, but I think it´s time to leave, you’ve got to do a show, so let´s go there! Thanks so much!
Danny: Let´s go!
Alan: Oh thanks so much to you! And don´t forget your bag!

www.dirtystrangers.com
https://www.facebook.com/thedirtystrangers

 

Advertisements

CON ALAN CLAYTON DE DIRTY STRANGERS EN LONDRES: “SOY MEJOR ESCRIBIENDO SI ESTOY ENTRE LA ESPADA Y LA PARED”

Standard

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 13 de agosto de 2017

Y en el octavo día Dios creó a los Dirty Strangers. O algo así, porque, a decir verdad, la historia de una de los grupos londinenses de culto más particulares de las tres últimas décadas, y algo más, tuvo que ver con situaciones más terrenales. No hubo ningún día octavo de creación, entonces, y aquel Creador tuvo que conformarse con siete días para hacer lo que podía. Su lugar fue ocupado por Alan Clayton, cantante, guitarrista y, sobre todo, compositor de las canciones de la banda surgida en Shepherd´s Bush, una de las áreas más cosmopolitas de la capital británica.

1..

The Dirty Strangers en algún momento de los 80: Ray King, Dirty Alan Clayton, Mark Harrison, Scotty Mulvey, Paul Fox

Como en un programa de una obra de teatro, entender la crónica de los Dirtys sugiere una breve descripción de buena parte del elenco que la integra. Encabezándolo aparece nueva e inevitablemente el nombre de Clayton, corazón y alma del grupo, el encargado principal del cometido, o como aparece acertadamente descripto en la página oficial del clan: “La banda tenía una misión: cargar la antorcha del rock’n’roll de raíz, tal como lo inventaron Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent y Chuck Berry, pero con un chorrito del soul de Otis Redding, y una guarnición de actitud punk” El reparto que gestó los primeros tiempos en la biografía de los Dirty Strangers continúa con Jim Callaghan, el más recordado de los jefes de Seguridad en las giras de los Rolling Stones por más de tres décadas, hoy retirado, bajo cuya órdenes Clayton supo trabajar cuando aún no había tomado el camino de la música. También está el ex boxeador Joe Seabrook, amigo de Alan, que también era empleado de la empresa de Seguridad de Callaghan, antes de convertirse en el guardaespaldas personal de Keith Richards, hasta su muerte en el año 2000. La nómina se completa con Stash Klossowski De Rola (más conocido como Prince Stash), un dandy aristocrático de la escena bohemia de Londres de mediados los ‘60s, que supo ser uno de los colegas más cercanos de Brian Jones, y con quien hasta compartió una detención policial histórica en 1967. Completando la historia, casi inevitablemente, aparece el mismísimo Keith Richards en su rol de catalizador casual, que gracias a los roles de todos los personajes antes mencionados acabó convirtiéndose no sólo en el padrino extraoficial del grupo, sino también en íntimo amigo de, claro, Alan Clayton. Una cosa llevó a la otra y, con más de 30 años de carrera y cuatro álbumes editados (“The Dirty Strangers”, “West 12 To Wittering (Another West Side Story)”, “Crime And A Woman”, y la recopilación “Diamonds”), el ahora cuarteto (Clayton en voz y guitarra, Scott Mulvey en piano, Cliff Wright en bajo y Danny Fury en batería) se apresta a grabar un nuevo trabajo a comienzos del año próximo. Tal como lo vienen haciendo desde sus inicios, antes continuarán recorriendo su habitual circuito de clubes de Inglaterra, a los que ahora se agregan 3 fechas en España a fines de septiembre (en Barcelona, Zaragoza y Reus)

2..

Afiche promocional del primer disco de la banda, con la presencia de Keith Richards y Ron Wood

NO TE DUERMAS HASTA HAMMERSMITH
MADHOUSE
estuvo en casa de Clayton en noviembre pasado para entrevistarlo y repasar el historial de su banda. Para llegar a la vivienda de “Dirty Alan” (donde en su parte trasera se ubica un estudio personal de dimensiones muy modestas, en el cual se registró buena parte del recetario musical de los Dirty Strangers) hay que acercarse al área de Hammersmith and Fulham, al oeste de Londres, muy cerca de la legendaria prisión local de Wormwood Scrubs, lo que implicó, al consultarle a una lugareña por la calle solicitada, tras citarle el nombre de la penitenciaría para llegar a destino cierto, una pregunta inapelablemente divertida (“oh, ¿es que tu amigo vive allí?”) La charla también contó con la participación de Danny Fury (ex integrante de los Lords of the New Church, entre otras aventuras, y nuevo miembro de los Dirtys), de quien en breve también estaremos presentando una entrevista exclusiva. Por el resto, he aquí un delicado repaso sobre la vida y obra de los Dirty Strangers en las propias palabras de su creador, una tarea que le llevó más, bastante más, de siete días.

3..

Clayton, Wright y Mulvey, en una reciente actuación

Los Dirtys nacieron a mediados de los ’80, pero antes de eso, ¿qué hacías como músico?
Alan: La banda se formó en 1978. Quiero decir, supongo que empecé a tocar guitar en el ’76, o algo así. Yo era de escribir música y poesía. Porque la mayoría de la gente piensa que la banda comenzó después que conocí a Keith (Richards) Y el verdadero motivo por el cual lo conocí fue que teníamos éxito. En aquel momento, bandas como los Lords of the New Church eran muy grandes, pero los Dirtys ya tenían su propia escena tocando en el Marquee. Cuando sos joven, tu carrera se mueve velozmente. Entonces, tres años antes que conociera a Keith, en 1981, nosotros ya habíamos encabezado el Marquee.

¿Cómo es que se dio aquel encuentro? ¿Qué es lo que sucedió, en verdad?
Alan: Yo hacía todo tipo de cosas, y uno de mis trabajos era el de Seguridad. Joe Seabrook era uno de mis mejores amigos, y lo conocía de antes de conocer a Keith. De hecho, esa primera vez, si bien fue por un instante, se dio en el pub de Big Joe.

4..

The Verulam Arms, el pub de Joe Seabrook, en sus días de gloria

¿Joe Seabrook tenía un pub?
Alan: Sí, en Watford. Se llamaba The Verulam Arms.

¿Watford?
Esa es la ciudad natal de Elton John, ¿no? Queda muy cerca de Hemel Hempstead, donde estoy parando actualmente.
Alan:
Correcto, queda muy cerca. De hecho Joe también era dueño de un pub en Hemel Hempstead.

Entonces, Joe no sólo tenía el pub, sino que además hacía Seguridad, al igual que vos.
Alan: Así es, se dedicaba a ambas cosas, y nos volvimos buenos amigos. Joe era guardaespaldas de los Stranglers, y también de Big Country.

¿Cómo fue que entonces conociste a Jim Callaghan?
Alan: Yo trabajaba en Seguridad para Jim y su socio Paddy, y su empresa se llamaba Call A Hand. Y Joe también empezó a trabajar para ellos. Y ya que Joe tenía una estatura y una presencia inmensa, también se convirtió en guardaespaldas.

5..

Keith Richards y Alan, en algún momento de principios de los 80: amistad y guitarras

¿Antes había sido boxeador, verdad?
Alan:
Sí, se había dedicado a eso.

Y mientras tanto vos hacías Seguridad por las tuyas.
Alan: Sí, pero trabajando para Jimmy, para Jimmy Callaghan.

OK entonces, una cosa llevó a  la otra, y así terminaste conociendo a Keith Richards, de quien Joe era su guardaespaldas personal. ¿Es así?
Alan: Sí. Y debido a que Joe y yo teníamos una gran conexión musical, cuando Joe comenzó a trabajar para Keith, quiso que escuchara nuestra música, porque sabía que a Keith iba a gustarle. Fue en Carlton Towers, en Knightsbridge. Me llevó a conocer a Keith. Y fue algo muy divertido, porque fuimos a su habitación a las 11 de la noche, ya que yo trabajaba durante el día. Entonces le pregunté a Joe, “¿y, a qué hora vamos a verlo?”, y Joe me contestó “Keith no se levanta antes de las 2 de la mañana” ¡Carajo! ¡Y yo que había estado trabajando todo el día!

¿Cómo te sentiste en aquel momento? ¿Te sentías excitado? Supongo que siempre te había gustado Keith como guitarrista…
Alan: ¡Claro que estaba excitado de conocerlo! A decir verdad, yo prefería a otra gente, pero a mí siempre me había gustado el mismo material que le gustaba a él. Otis Redding, Motown…Siempre me gustaron los Stones, pero más me gustaban los Who, ya que eran más londinenses. Entonces, así fue como lo conocí. Recuerdo cuando entramos en su cuarto en las Carlton Towers, y Joe dijo, “éste es Alan, toca en una banda que suena como acostumbraban a sonar los Stones…” Y Keith dijo, “Ojalá vuelva a suceder, ya ha pasado un tiempo de eso…”

Y ésa es finalmente la historia de la primera vez que conociste al hombre que luego terminaría siendo muy importante en la carrera de los Dirty Strangers.
Alan:
Sí, tal cual. Y dos días más tarde Keith me dice “me estoy yendo a París ahora mismo”, y yo le dije “oh, nunca estuve en París”, entonces me mandó a su chofer, con la orden de que vayamos a buscar una guitarra para él, y un bastón, y me dijo “venite para París, y te quedás conmigo” Y yo lo había conocido apenas 2 días antes, sabés…

Y así fueron las cosas…Puedo entender lo de la guitarra, ¿pero para qué te pidió un bastón?
Alan:  El bastón era para Bert. El chofer llegó manejando el Bentley de Keith, me recogió y nos fuimos para París. Pero Bert, su padre, todavía vivía en Dartford, donde Keith nació, entonces, camino a Dover, pasamos a buscarlo. Y así fue el viaje. Bert y yo en el Bentley de Keith, más el chofer, rumbo a París.

6..

Keith y Alan, en tiempos más actuales: amistad y sofás

¿Y Keith?
Alan:
No, él fue en avión.

¡Debe haber sido un gran viaje!
Alan: ¡Oh, fue buenísmo!

¡Gran anécdota, y también gran forma de comenzar una amistad con Keith Richards!
Alan:
Sí, pero antes ya había estado en el estudio con Ronnie Wood. Habíamos grabado “Baby”, “Here She Comes” y “Easy To Please”…

Para el primer álbum de los Dirtys.
Alan: Así es. Correcto. Y también tocó en “Thrill Of A Thrill” Entonces, yo ya había trabajado con Ronnie, y Keith nos ayudó a conseguir algunos shows en París. Todavía no teníamos contrato discográfico, y sucedió al mismo tiempo en que Mick (Jagger) estaba grabando su primer álbum solista, y por lo tanto Keith no estaba ocupado. Así que todo sucedió en el momento justo.

Y todo gracias a Joe Seabrook.
Alan:¡Sí! Joe representa una parte importante de mi carrera, porque nuestros primeros shows fueron en su pub. Pero como te dije, antes yo ya había trabajado en Seguridad para Jimmy Callaghan. Trabajé en los shows de los Stones en Earl’s Court en 1976. Conseguía todo tipo de empleos de parte de Jimmy, como el de “despejar” prostíbulos en el Soho de Londres. Casas de prostitutas…

Sí, Jim fue muy bueno conmigo. Fue de gran ayuda en mucha soportunidades  cuando seguí el tour de los Stones en USA en el ’94.
Alan: Es un hombre adorable. Y, si bien conocí a Keith a través de Joe, Jimmy fue mi primer amigo.

7..

The Ruts, con Paul Fox al frente, lata de cerveza en mano

EXTRAÑOS EN AMÉRICA
Quisiera preguntarte sobre Paul Fox, fallecido en el 2007, que si bien era integrante de los Ruts, también fue guitarrista de la primera formación de los Dirty Strangers, ¿verdad?
Alan: No, no estuvo en la primera formación del grupo, pero sí en la primera que fue a tocar a los EE. UU. Y también tocó en nuestro primer disco. El de la primera formación fue Alistair Simmons, que también tocaba en los Lords of the New Church. Él es quien escribió “Baby”, “Running Slow”…Todavía canto canciones que escribí con él. Y cuando Alistair dejó a los Dirty Strangers, se unió a los Lords. Era un tipo encantador y fantástico, pero, sabés, no podía sobrellevar la situación. Y en cuanto a Paul Fox, fue muy divertido, porque cuando Malcolm Owen, el cantante…Conocés la historia de los Ruts, ¿no?

A decir verdad, muy poco…
Alan:
Los Ruts iban a salir de gira con The Who, pero Malcolm era un junkie y, carajo, tuvieron que cancelar esa gira. Tuvo un final muy desafortunado. Cuando yo trabajaba en Seguridad, veía a los Ruts y me decía, “yo podría cantar en esta banda” Y también eran de West London, por lo que también existía esa conexión. Y 3 o 4 años después de eso, yo me encontraba en la parte de atrás de un cine en Kensal Rise, en Londres, que ya no existe, tratando de conseguir una fecha. Y Paul Fox también estaba ahí, y viene y me dice, “realmente me hacés acordar a nuestro viejo cantante” Y yo le contesté, “sabés qué, cuando tu cantante murió, yo estuve a punto de postularme para el puesto” Y Paul me dijo, “deseo que lo hubieras hecho” Porque después que Malcolm murió, los Ruts cambiaron completamente de rumbo.  Y llegué a conocerlo, había subido a tocar con nosotros un par de veces. Yo ya lo consideraba un nuevo amigo, y me agradaba mucho. Y 2 semanas antes de que comenzáramos nuestro tour en USA, Alistair pudrió todo. Teníamos un mánager nuevo, y todo esto le iba a costar un montón de dinero. Alistair siempre estaba al borde de ser brillante, o fuckin’ desastroso. Estaba tan colgado que no podía tocar la guitarra. Y entonces mi mánager dijo, “no pienso poner un centavo para llevarlo a los Estados Unidos” Imaginate todas las tentaciones que podrían haberle ofrecido estando allí…

Huty21393 021

Oh yeah: otra toma de los Dirtys en sus primeros tiempos

Y así fue como Alistair no participó de la gira.
Alan: No. Fue toda una decisión, ya que era mi mejor amigo. Lo echamos 2 semanas antes de la gira por USA. Ese tour era uno de nuestros objetivos principales, así que lo llamé a Paul Fox y le pedí que forme parte. Y entonces se unió a la banda.

¿Cómo resultó la gira por los EE. UU. de una banda chica del circuito londinense que iba allí por primera vez?
Alan: Solamente tocamos en la costa este. No fue realmente un tour, duró algo así como 7 u 8 días.

¿Tocaron sólo en lugares chicos?
Alan: Bueno, tocamos en el Cat Club de New York, que es un lugar grande. Y después en lugares cerca de la ciudad, sabés…Boston, etc.

La primera vez que los Dirtys tocaban en USA…
Alan: Sí, y todavía no teníamos contrato discográfico.

¿Pero cómo? ¿No era que 2 años antes habían grabado con Ronnie?
Alan:  Sí, habíamos grabado con Ronnie, y después con Keith. Mick había editado su disco solista, así que Keith estaba con tiempo de sobra. Pero seguíamos sin contrato.

9..

Los Dirtys y Ron Wood: amistad y fotos tomadas de un video

¿Cómo fue que Prince Stash terminó produciendo el disco? Pareciera ser que siempre todo termina orbitando a los Stones…
Alan:  OK, veo que recordás eso. Stash había sido detenido con Brian Jones en los ‘60. Y cuando Keith vino al estudio a grabar con nosotros, Stash estaba con él. Si ves esa fotografía…Hay una foto  de todos nosotros en el estudio con Keith y Stash. Y momentos después Stash preguntó, “¿quién les está editando el disco?” Y así fue como formó Thrill Records, por el título de la canción que abre nuestro el primer álbum, “Thrill Of A Thrill”. Así que entonces puso en marcha el sello, y le dedicó 1 año completo de su vida. Quiero decir, se lanzó mundialmente, y anduvo muy bien. Todo parecía tan fácil en aquel momento, pero ahora uno dice, “carajo, me gustaría que ahora sea igual” Y Stash invirtió mucha plata en el álbum, fue genial. Tengo grandes historias sobre él. ¿Te acordás de Pinnacle, la distribuidora de las compañías grabadoras independientes? Cuando uno se dirigía allí, tenía solamente 20 minutos para convencerlos de que te contraten, y 45 minutos más tarde Stash les estaba diciendo que había sido un gran disco pero…

Entonces coincidió todo.
Alan: Coincidió, pero en lo que respecta a USA, todo empezó a andar mal. Lo que sucedió fue que, vendimos muchos discos en Gran Bretaña, y cuando Stash lo llevó a USA, usaron el nombre de Keith para promoverlo. Recordemos que antes de lanzar su primer disco solista, “Talk Is Cheap”, Keith ya había grabado con nosotros. Y cuando empezó a  trabajar en su primer álbum, que en aquel momento era todo un acontecimiento, en su contrato estaba especificado que no podía trabajar en discos de otros. Como siempre decía su mánager, “cuando Keith Richards graba con amigos, lo mejor es que la gente lo descubra. De otra forma, puede salir mal” Y en la edición americana del disco, Stash le había agregado una calcomanía a la tapa que decía “The Dirty Strangers con la participación de Keith Richards y Ronnie Wood” Eso fue justo cuando Keith estaba por lanzar un adelanto de su álbum solista. Y entonces nuestro disco se canceló en USA. No fue nada astuto al promoverlo allí. Todo el mundo usaba el fuckin’ nombre de Keith, como si fuera una herramienta publicitaria.

10..¿Fue Stash el que tuvo la idea de poner eso en la tapa del disco?
Alan: Oh sí, debe haber sido Stash, sí. Keith tocó en el disco como amigo.

Cambiando de tema, hace unos años trabajaste junto a John Sinclair, quien fuera mánager de los MC5, y también un recordado activista político.
Alan: No sólo el mánager de la banda, sino también la inspiración, entre tantas cosas…

Es verdad, de hecho fue uno de los fundadores del White Panther Party (N. de la R.: facción política de extrema izquierda anti-rascista fundada en los EE. UU. en 1968) Pero tu trabajo con él fue en “Beatnik Youth”, su álbum de 2012. Vi el video en YouTube en el que…
Alan: ¡Oh, pero eso fue otra cosa, diferente a lo de “Beatnik Youth”! Bueno, ya sabés la historia de John Sinclair y los MC5…En verdad no me crucé con él. Mi conocimiento de los MC5 fue a través de Brian James (N. de la R.: ex miembro de The Damned y Lords of the New Church) Y una vez recibí un llamado de George Butler, que fue baterista en los Dirtys antes de Danny, diciéndome, “hay un amigo mío de Brighton, Tim, que quiere grabar algo con John Sinclair. ¿Te parece que hagamos algo en el estudio?” Y yo le dije, “sí, por supuesto” Entonces vino Sinclair. Pero yo seguía intrigado sobre él. Y cuando llegó, fue casi lo mismo que cuando conocí a Keith, me conecté con él instantáneamente. Pensé, “oh, ¡otro espíritu afín!”

11..

John Sinclair, una leyenda en blanco y negro

Desde ya, hace rato que venía haciendo cosas…
Alan: Sí, anduvo por ahí…Y cuando editamos el álbum “West 12 to Wittering”, Youth, que había tyrabajado con Sinclair, produjo parte del disco, como fue el caso de la canción “She´s A Real Boticelli”, el single de difusión…

¡Amo esa canción! Es una de mis favoritas.
Alan:  Si me preguntás cómo fue que la escribí…Youth la produjo, fue una mezcla de él. Youth había sido productor de The Verve, y bajista en Killing Joke. Es muy bueno produciendo. Y también tuvo una banda con Paul McCartney (N. de la R.: The Fireman) Es un tipo genial. Le dije que había conocido a John Sinclair, y él había producido “Lock And Key”, la canción que John había grabado con los Dirty Strangers, y entonces me dijo “¿por qué no hacemos un álbum?” Y escribimos un álbum, que tiene que salir en algún momento. ¡Carajo, es un disco fantástico! Del tipo de música que nunca fue mi estilo. Porque Youth viene de diferentes áreas. Nos conocíamos desde hacía mucho tiempo. Y después estaba John Sinclair. Porque John daba vueltas por Europa tocando. Ahora vive en Amsterdam. Y siempre se metía en bares chicos, bares genéricos, donde tocaban blues, y él les agregaba algo de poesía. Lo que Youth y yo quisimos hacer era llevar eso a otro nivel, así podía tener un álbum con canciones auténticas, no solamente blues con pedazos de poesía. Entonces terminamos usando su poesía como versos de las canciones, y les agregamos coros, y así fue que terminaron convirtiéndose en canciones.

¿Podrías decir que fuiste parte de la escena del punk londinense, o fue más que nada de la del rock and roll en general?
Alan: No, yo empecé con los Dirty Strangers. Cuando se dio lo del Punk, que es algo que yo adoraba, fue fuckin’ grandioso, porque me llevó de ser alguien que tocaba en su cuarto, a alguien que creía que podía formar un grupo. Y realmente lo hice. Y siempre podía ponerme a escribir canciones, o poesía, así que amaba la escena del punk. En aquel momento, en 1976, yo tenía 22 años, y todos los punks simulaban tener 16 o 17. Todos los punks como Mick Jones o Tony James tenían mi edad, 22 o 23 años. Entonces, si bien todavía no estaba en ninguna banda, conocía a Mick Jones antes de que fuera parte de los Clash, porque yo acostumbraba a trabajar en el edificio del Colegio de Arte de Hammersmith en Shepherd´s Bush, y Mick estudiaba ahí. Su primer show fue como telonero de los Kursaal Flyers en el Roundhouse, así que me sentía conectado a la escena del punk por conocer a Mick. Era una escena fuertemente influenciada por la parte oeste de Londres, por lo que de todas maneras, yo estaba ahí. Y todos ellos tenían mi edad. Al mismo tiempo yo ya estaba trabajando como Seguridad en muchos conciertos, lo que me permitía ver a todas las bandas. Y puedo decir que eso me inspiró definitivamente a formar un grupo de rock’n’roll. Todas las bandas punk que me gustaban eran realmente bandas de rock´n´roll, pero con una nueva energía.

Siempre tuve la impresión de que que lo tuyo es más que nada el material de los 50s y los ’60.
Alan: Oh, ¡yo amo el rock´n´roll!, sabés… ¿Qué puede haber que ame más que nada en el mundo? Tal vez ver a las mujeres bailar cuando estamos tocando…

12..WITTERING HEIGHTS
Lo mencionaste hace un rato, pero quisiera que hablemos más en profundidad sobre el álbum “West 12 to Wittering” Sabemos que Keith tocó piano en el disco, de hecho aparece en varias canciones. Y también Ronnie Wood. Y fuera de eso, es sin dudas no solo mi álbum favorito de los Dirty Strangers, pero también uno de los discos en general aque más suelo escuchar. Imaginate lo que me gusta ese disco…
Alan: Gracias, muchísimas gracias.

Y de hecho hace unos días estaba caminando por aquí, en Londres, mientras lo escuchaba, y es sin dudas un álbum que tiene una atmósfera absolutamente londinense.
Alan: Por supuesto, es sobre Londres, definitivamente.

A lo que voy es, uno no escucha a Madonna cuando camina por Londres…
Alan: ¡Jajaja! Sí, los Dirty Strangers resultan una buena elección a la hora de hacerlo. Y la historia del disco es que…Yo venía de trabajar en la gira de los Stones de “A Bigger Bang”, que duró alrededor de 2 años y medio, y los Dirtys habían estado parados por cerca de 8 años. Y mientras viajaba escribí un montón de canciones. Entonces, al volver, decidí volver a juntar al grupo, pero en aquel momento éramos solamente yo, John Proctor y George Butler, un trío, y decidimos llamarnos Monkey Seed.

¿Le cambiaste el nombre al grupo?
Alan: No, lo que sucedió fue que los Dirty Strangers estaban algo así como disueltos, si bien nunca nos habíamos separado. No habíamos tocado por mucho tiempo, ni tampoco ganado dinero y, ya sabés, eso desmotiva a la gente. Así que cuando decidí volver a juntar al grupo, quise que empezara de cero. Entonces quería que tenga un nombre nuevo. No pensaba hacer canciones de los Dirty Strangers, solamente canciones nuevas. Pero como de todas maneras yo había escrito todas las canciones de la banda, me dirigí a Ian Grant, que acababa de formar el sello Track Records, y le dije, “tengo un álbum de canciones, ¿te gustaría contratarme para Track Records?” Dijo que sí, ya que le gustaba lo que estaba haciendo. Y entonces me preguntó, “¿por qué le cambiaste el nombre a la banda?” Y le contesté, “bueno, es que quiero un nuevo comienzo” Y Ian me dijo, “Alan, ¡tenés más de 50, ya no tenés 20 años!” (risas) ¡Y tenía razón! Después me dijo, “escuchame, tenés la reputación de los Dirty Strangers, porque básicamente vos sos los Dirty Strangers. ¿Porqué habrías de cambiarle el nombre? Siempre les funcionó. Te sugiero que la sigas llamando The Dirty Strangers”. Y yo accedí. A veces te hace feliz que exista gente que te digas cosas así, porque generalmente uno no se da cuenta. Uno piensa, “sí, tengo una nueva banda, la voy a llamar tal y tal…” Así que lo pusimos en marcha, y cuando se lo comenté a Keith, me preguntó, “¿querés que toque guitarra en el disco?” Y yo le contesté, “no, quiero encargarme yo de las guitarras”, pero le dije, “¿podés tocar algo de piano?” Y Keith me contestó, “claro, fuckin’ por supuesto!” Y es por eso que se llama “West 12 to Wittering”, porque cuando está en Inglaterra, Keith vive en Wittering, y yo llevé todo el equipo desde mi lugar aquí en el área W12 de Londres para grabar su parte, y es como que “acampamos” en su casa.

13..

Clayton, Proctor (hoy ex bajista del grupo) y Danny Fury

¿Lo grabaron en la casa de Keith?
Alan: Sí, en Redlands. Solamente su parte, la del piano, que fue grabada allí.

¿O sea que paraste en su casa exclusivamente para grabar la parte del piano que se usó en el álbum?
Alan: Bueno, en verdad paré en su casa en muchas oportunidades.

Wittering es una zona muy hermosa.
Alan:  Sí, encantadora. Tanto me resulta así que, si alguna vez me mudara de Londres, ese es el lugar donde me iría a vivir.

Pequeño mundo. Justamente hace días fui a ver a Ian Hunter en Shepherd’s Bush, y de casualidad, me puse a hablar con un matrimonio que vive allí.
Alan:¡Ian Hunter? ¿Tocó en Shepherd’s Bush?

Desde ya, fue hace 3 días. Jamás tocó en Sudamérica, y sería muy raro que alguna vez lo haga, así que no podía perdérmelo. Y con Graham Parker de telonero.
Alan:
¡Oh, amo a Graham Parker!
Danny: ¿Acaso salió el aviso en algún lugar?
Alan: Si el show está sold-out, no lo publicitan.

Perdón, ¡ahora me hacen sentir culpa!
Alan: ¡No sabía que iba a tocar en Londres!
Danny: Si te fijás en internet, generalmente aparece ahí.
Alan: En general aparece un aviso en el diario Evening Standard, o en la revista Time-Out.
Danny: Antes uno podía ver los avisos en el Melody Maker. Todos los anuncios de shows aparecían ahí.
Alan: Time-Out, para mí, habiendo tenido una banda, era el lugar donde aparecían todos los avisos, y ahora sólo están los que fueron seleccionados.

SUCIOS., EXTRAÑOS Y CONCEPTUALES
¿Qué me podés decir sobre “Crime And A Woman”, el disco más reciente de los Dirtys? Sé que se trata de un álbum conceptual.
Alan: Es una historia narrada desde el principio hasta el final, si es que querés que sea una historia. Si querés que sea una colección de canciones de rock´n´roll, es una colección de canciones de rock´n´roll. Pero hay toda una historia dentro del disco, que probablemente resulte para mi propio beneficio, más que el de cualquier otra persona.

14..Sí, cuando el otro día te pregunté por qué Keith esta vez no estaba esta vez en el disco, me dijiste que es un álbum que quisiste resultara más personal, y me explicaste que querías que sea “tu” álbum.
Alan: Sí. Porque lo que sucede es que, si bien es genial que Keith sea uno de tus mejores amigos, la parte mala es que, cada vez que tocás tu propio material, o que alguien va a verte tocar, permanentemente me hacen la misma pregunta: “¿Keith va a estar en el disco?”, o “¿Keith va a estar en el show?” Entiendo que la gente pregunte esas cosas, pero no es su banda. Es mi banda, que toca de vez en cuando, y se llama The Dirty Strangers. Y quiero que el grupo represente en vivo todo lo que grabamos.

Bueno, como sea, es otro disco que no deja de encantarme.
Alan: A mí también me encanta, porque suena genial. “Keith, “¿podrías venir y tocar en el disco?” Keith es genial, pero no toca en vivo con nosotros.

Siempre escribís solo. De hecho sos el único que escribe las canciones de los Dirtys.
Alan:
Y ahora que estuve tocando con Danny desde hace un tiempo…Danny escribe canciones, y sin dudas va a colaborar de aquí en adelante.

Pero básicamente todas las canciones del último disco son tuyas.
Alan: Sí, pero hay un par de canciones, como en el caso de “Running Slow” y “Are You Satisfied”, que fueron co-escritas con Alistair…Pero Alistair murió hace 10 años. Fue un gran compañero. Y después está “One Good Reason”, que escribí junto a Tam Nightingale, y además Scotty co-escribió “Short & Sweet”. Pero en verdad, sí, fue mi álbum.

¿Qué cosas te inspiran a la hora de escribir canciones? ¿La vida cotidiana?
Alan: Definitivamente, la vida diaria. Si tengo una pausa, o un momento de calma, al igual que la mayoría de la gente, soy mejor escribiendo cuando estoy entre la espada y la pared. Cuando estoy cómodo, cuando todo funciona bien, me resulta muy difícil escribir canciones, porque hay paz en mi vida. ¿No creés, que es así, Danny? ¿Que se escriben mejores canciones cuando se está alborotado?
Danny: Sí, por supuesto.

Si no fuera así, no existirían los músicos ni las canciones de blues.
Alan:
Sí, exactamente. Los momentos difíciles son los que te llevan a escarbar profundo.

Y supongo que lo mismo le sucede a los escritores.
Alan: Sí. Bueno, ¿cuántos escritores y comediantes torturados conocemos? Gente que es maníaca-depresiva, y que hacen hermosos trabajos.
Danny: Y se enfocan en su desorden interior.

Es como que de alguna manera lográs exorcizar tus pesares. Resulta toda una terapia, finalmente.
Alan: Eso es definitivamente correcto. Si tengo algo muy fuerte dentro de mi cabeza, sin dudas voy a escribir una canción sobre eso.

15..

Los Dirtys hoy: Danny Fury, Alan Clayton, Cliff Wright y Scott Mulvey

Y, más allá de las letras, no es fácil encontrar bandas cono los Dirty Strangers hoy en día, con toda esa cosa blusera y de rock´n´roll badass, con un filo de punk rock. Y ahora, ¡bienvenido Danny y la sangre nueva en el grupo!
Alan: ¡Así es!

MAYBE IT´S BECAUSE I´M A LONDONER
¿Qué piensan de la escena musical actual londinense?
Alan: ¿Puedo ser totalmente honesto con vos? La escena musical me importa un carajo, solo me importan los Dirty Strangers. Cuando estás en una banda de rock and roll, no te pueden importar los demás. Realmente, porque fuckin’ amás el rock and roll. ¿Lo ves así, Danny?
Danny: Sí, es como que estás atrapado en tu propia cosa. Pero si es que tal vez puedo responder a esa pregunta, de todas formas tengo una pequeña impresión al respecto, ya que aún estoy algo interesado en lo que sucede. Una saca nuevo material en ese contexto, y si querés que el mundo lo conozca, tenés que ponerte a trabajar. De ahí es que viene mi interés. Es realmente como dijo Alan, es como si fuera un cliente limitado. Pero creo que existe una gran falta de personalidades, una falta de expresión auténtica. Pareciera que todo el mundo copiara algo que ya había sido hecho antes.

Bueno, eso sucede porque mayormente lo hacen porque sólo están interesados en ganar dinero.
Alan: Sí, sí…
Danny: Es verdad que se hace música por dinero, pero no hay mucha música que realmente te alcance y te toque de cerca, quiero decir, algo que represente una expresión genuina de personalidad.
Alan: Además, todavía sigo descubriendo música de los ’50, hay toda una estructura musical de esos años.
Danny: Existe tanta música…
Alan: Me gustaría saber si eso de la música en sí sigue sucediendo con los más jóvenes. Yo no soy quién para comentar sobre lo que les gusta a los quinceañeros, porque no tengo 15 años. ¿De acuerdo? Pero sé lo que hago a mi edad. Y hago rock’n’roll. Veo que muchas bandas se comprometen, pero nosotros nunca nos compremetemos, sólo tocamos lo que tocamos. A lo largo de mi carrera, siempre me fijé en las modas, después me olvidé de eso, y más tarde le presté atención a la moda nuevamente. Uno simplemente hace lo que hace.

Es exactamente como lo dijiste, siempre se trata de mirar al pasado, porque hay tanta música buena ahí…
Alan: Yo escucho mucha radio, por lo que no me cierro al mundo exterior. Todavía hay gente que escribe grandes canciones. Y soy muy protector con el rock’n’roll, mientras hay bandas que juegan con él.
16..Como si sólo fuera una palabra suelta…
Alan:
Sí, y vivo mi vida para eso. Y sé que lo vengo haciendo desde hace mucho tiempo.

Entonces, si es que puedo preguntártelo, ¿de qué vivís fuera de los Dirty Strangers?
Alan: ¡Soy el mayordomo de Danny! (se ríe fuertemente)

Bueno, es que me resultaba curioso saberlo…
Alan:
Él es de Suiza, entonces tiene mucho dinero… (risas)

Sin dudas, Suiza está llena de millonarios.
Alan:
¡Claro que los hay! (risas) Y nosotros somos sus empleados.
Danny: Debería pedirle que se cambie el nombre por el de James, o algo así… (risas)

BOB & MARLEY & ALAN & JOHNNY
Alan, recuerdo haber leído una historia tuya junto a Bob Marley que me resultó muy divertida…
Alan:
¡Con mucho gusto! Cuando trabajaba para Jimmy Callaghan, a fines de los ‘70, una vez estábamos trabajando en el Crystal Palace’s Bowl, que era un lugar abierto para shows en el sur de Londres, y en aquel momento el área de backstage no tenía camarines. En su lugar se usaban carpas grandes. Y mi trabajo consistía en cuidar la carpa en la que estaba Bob Marley. Big Joe también estaba ahí. Y lo que ocurrió fue que, en esa época, lo de la Seguridad no era como es ahora. La zona del backstage tenía vallas muy bajas alrededor del lugar, y no había mucha Seguridad, y parecía ser que todos los jamaiquinos que habían ido al show pensaban que tenían el derecho de conocer a Marley. Entonces lo que hacían era saltar esas vallas, tratando de meterse en su carpa, y yo era el único que estaba ahí para pararlos.

18..Bob Marley era realmente “la gran cosa” en aquellos años…
Alan: ¡Claro que lo era! La “gran cosa” para los jamaiquinos. Era su hombre espiritual, y demás. Y la gente que intentaba meterse en su carpa, no le gustaba que yo los parara, si bien ése era mi trabajo, y lo que sucedió es que siempre había conmoción. Y de repente alguien me tocó el hombre y me dijo, “vení, entrá”, y me metió en la carpa de Bob Marley. Marley estaba sentado sobre un amplificador tocando la guitarra, y de repente se puso a liar un porro enorme. Y mientras Bob seguía tocando la guitarra, ¡me hicieron fumar y me drogaron, para calmarme! (risas) Estuve ahí unos 20 o 25 minutos. Y recién me enviaron de vuelta afuera una vez que me calmé.

¡20 minutos con Bob Marley! No es una historia muy común…
Alan:
¡Sí!

¿Te gustaba la música jamaiquina en ese momento?
Alan:
Sabés, cuando era joven, mi primera música fue el ska. Johnny, mi padre, era un “teddy boy”, por lo que amaba el rock and roll. Él es cantante, hice un álbum con él.

Sí, leí algo sobre eso.
Alan: Y Keith toca en el álbum, y Bobby Keys también. Ese es el disco de mi papá, Johnny Clayton.

¿El disco fue ya fue editado? ¿ O se trata de una grabación privada?
Alan:
No, aún no, pero ya va a editarse. Brian James, Keith Richards, Bobby Keys, Jim Jones (de la Jim Jones Revue) y Tyla, de los Dogs D’Amour. Todos tocando con mi padre.

19..¿Todas sesiones de estudio?
Alan: Sí. Ése va a ser el próximo disco que se edite, el de mi padre. El de John Sinclair ya había sido editado a través de otro sello, y de hecho también vamos a grabar otro álbum con los Dirty Strangers. Pero antes que todo eso vamos a reeditar el primer disco de la banda, “The Dirty Strangers”, pero con nuevo material, inéditos, etc. Supongo que el disco de mi papá va a ser lanzado al mismo tiempo. Hay gente grandiosa en el disco.

Es verdad, es una gran formación. ¿Va a incluir nuevas canciones o son todos covers?
Alan:
No, son todas canciones de Dean Martin, y de Frank Sinatra. Y la banda básica en el disco es Mallet en batería, Dave Tregunna en bajo, Scott Mulvey de los Dirtys en piano, y yo tocando acústica, y después están los guitarristas y los saxofonistas invitados.

¿Tienen la idea de salir a hacer shows en otros países, o son más una banda local que suele tocar en Londres, o en otras ciudades inglesas?
Alan: ¡Queremos tocar en todas partes! Ya tocamos en Europa, y ahora, con Danny en la banda, iniciamos una nueva etapa. Necesitábamos realmente que nos maneje alguien que esté más al nivel de la tierra, y mi hijo Paul está haciendo todo eso.

Se lo ve muy entusiasta.
Alan: Lo es, ¡es el hijo de su padre! Entonces, sí, queremos tocar en donde sea.

Como músico, ¿existe alguien con quien te hubiera gustado grabar o tocar?
Danny:
En verdad quería tocar conmigo… (risas)
Alan: ¡Oh, mis sueños finalmente se hicieron realidad! Te lo digo así, si no fuera con Danny (risas) sería con alguien como Otis Redding, mi cantante favorito de todos los tiempos. Sí, es mi cantante favorito. Fin de la historia.

Sos un “soul man”.
Alan: Sí, pero mi papá era un “teddy boy”, así que soy una mezcla extraña.

Es todo lo mismo, es música maravillosa, después de todo, ya sea soul, rock and roll, rhythm and blues…¡Todos esos grandes músicos negros!
Alan: No pueden hablar como yo, ¡pero yo sí puedo hablar como ellos! ¡Jajaja!
Danny: Lo sienten en el corazón, digo, tienen ese sentimiento. Y encima de todo, Alan tiene una gran voz.
Alan: ¡Gracias! Deberíamos parar aquí… (risas)

20..y

El autor de esta nota junto a los protagonistas de la misma: el negro es el nuevo negro

RECUERDOS DEL FUTURO
Es tal como dijiste, se trata mayormente de volver al pasado, que es cuando se hizo la mejor música. Justamente ayer estaba escuchando mi disco en vivo favorito de todos los tiempos, el de Jerry Lee Lewis en vivo en el Star Club de Hamburgo en 1964, que vendría a ser…¡el disco más salvaje que alguna vez se grabó! Eso sí que es heavy metal. Alguien incluso lo describió como “no un álbum, sino una escena del crimen”
Alan:
¡Sí! Te voy a contar una historia muy divertida que Ronnie Wood me contó, de cuando estuvo de gira con Jerry Lee. Estaban los dos caminando juntos en el lobby de un hotel, y apareció una mujer, que abrazó a Jerry, diciéndole “Jerry, olés maravillosamente, ¿qué te pusiste?” Y él le contestó, “lo que pasa es que se me paró, honey. ¡No sabía que podías olerlo desde ahí!”
Danny: ¡Es increíble!
Alan: ¡Esa es genial! ¿O no?

Me encantan las historias así. ¿Alguna más que quieras contarme?
Alan:
¿Querés saber cómo es que escribí la canción “She´s A Real Boticelli”?

21..Me encantaría saberlo. Siempre me pregunté qué es eso de ser “una Boticelli auténtica”…
Alan:
Bueno, te voy a decir cómo ocurrieron las cosas. Yo estaba en Redlands, y estábamos con Keith en la cocina de la casa, cocinando. Yo estaba pelando papas, y Keith preparaba la carne. En Inglaterra, cuando sos chico, es muy común que leas una colección de libros llamada “Just William” El personaje principal de las historias es un chico de 13 años, que vive en el campo con sus padres y una hermana, y que siempre está teniendo aventuras. Cualquier persona que sea de nacionalidad inglesa conoce esos libros. Supongo que cada país tendrá los suyos. Y este chico forma parte de un gang llamado The Outlaws (Los Bandidos) que tienen una banda rival. Y están todos esos personajes que pasan por el lugar donde vive. Músicos, vagabundos, viajeros…Y todos esos libros fueron escritos por una mujer, Richmal Compton. Y yo me pasé toda mi infancia creyendo que los había escrito un tipo. O sea que esta mujer escribió tosas esas aventuras fantásticas desde la perspectiva de un chico. Y nos dimos cuenta que tanto a Keith como a mí nos encantaban, que habíamos tenido un amor mutuo por esas historias a medida que íbamos creciendo. Y cuando la oficina de los Stones se enteró de nuestro amor por esos libros, nos los enviaron en formato CD, y solíamos escucharlos cuando nos poníamos a cocinar. Y uno empezaba con la frase “she´s a real Boticelli!”, pero en verdad lo que está diciendo es “she´s got a real bottle of cherry” (“tiene una botella real de cherry”) Lo habíamos entendido mal. Miré a Keith y me dijo “parece un fuckin´ título de una canción de Chuck Berry, ¿o no?” Así que viene de ahí, de cuando cocinábamos, del CD del libro. Entonces nos robamos la primera estrofa, y escribimos la canción “She’s a Real Boticelli”

¡Gran anécdota! Y agreguemos que su nombre nació en Redlands, al igual que la historia del jardinero, que se usó para el título de “Jumpin´Jack Flash”. Ya conocés la historia…
Alan:
¡Así es!

OK, saben que podríamos quedarnos hablando horas, pero creo que deberíamos salir para el show de esta noche, y no quiero ser el culpable de que lleguen tarde. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Danny:
¡Ya mismo!
Alan:
¡Muchas gracias a vos! Y no olvides tu bolso.

www.dirtystrangers.com
https://www.facebook.com/thedirtystrangers

 

2 HOURS -AND MORE- WITH ANITA PALLENBERG

Standard
“Aren’t you staying for lunch?” How could one ever say ‘no’ to that when it’s Anita Pallenberg who’s asking it? It all happened last year during the days of the fourth and (so far) last visit of the Stones to Buenos Aires as part of the Latin American Olé Tour, which had started a few days earlier in Santiago de Chile, and with 10 more shows to go after the three in Argentina, closing on a high note in Havana, Cuba. This time, in order to avoid fans leaning out at the hotel doors, or even camping out, looking to catch a glimpse of the band, the Stones’ machine had come up with a new strategy, which was splitting them into different locations. Then Jagger stayed at the Palacio Duhau Park Hyatt, and Ronnie Wood at the Faena Hotel, while the Four Seasons (where the whole band was in all previous visits, taking over the luxurious Álzaga Unzué mansion, at the back of the hotel) was the headquarters of both Charlie Watts and Keith Richards.
 

As it’s been happening for at least the last 25 years (eventually, as the Stones’ kids grew older), taking them on tour became a usual thing. Children, wives, and even parents (during the band’s first time in the country in 1995, Keith had even brought dad Bert with him) ended up joining the party as they wandered around the world. But never ex-love partners. So I felt already too skeptical when an English girl friend that had come to South America to see some of the shows (and who was also staying at the Four Seasons) told me she had seen Anita Pallenberg in the afternoon taking a swim at the hotel’s pool. I denied her statement right from start. Anita hadn’t been close to the band for 35 years or more, at least since she stopped being Keith’s love-mate, and even when they were together, she was never one to show up on tours much often. “Anita? No way! You must have seen somebody that looked like her” Less likely to happen in South America, I thought to myself. I then asked her if she somehow had a chance to talk to the woman. “No, I didn’t”, she admitted, “but I sure can tell it was Anita. She was swimming next to me, she had a leopard bathing suit…” I could have kept refusing it on and on, I was sure she was clearly mistaken. At the end of the day, I thought again, everybody sees everybody’s look-alikes all the time. In fact the last time Anita had visited far away South America was around Christmas in 1968, when along Keith Richards,Marianne Faithfull and (Marianne’s then) boyfriend Mick Jagger took a boat all the way to Brazil, spending their holidays in the city of Matão (countryside of the São Paulo state, where Keith got the inspiration to write “Honky Tonk Women”), and then moving to Rio and Bahia, before heading for a few days in Perú. At the time, Anita had already become Keith’s steady girlfriend after he rescued her from the arms of his fellow bandmate Brian Jones (her original lover, with whom she shared an idyllic relationship before Jones, paranoid and currently dealing with one too many addictions, became violent with her) My friend’s theory about Anita’s sight in Buenos Aires 48 years later was, to say the least, unthinkable. However, as I was pacing the hotel lobby next day to meet another friend, who was also staying at the Four Seasons, I happened to see a woman walking by away enough from me who looked a lot like Anita (eventually, Anita in those days, whose older image I was familiar with after I had seen some new pictures of her on the internet a few months earlier) The woman rushed out of one of the elevators, going somewhere else. It all didn’t last for more than a millisecond, and wondering if I hadn’t actually imagined it (or, worst case scenario, if it wasn’t somebody resembling me of her), I decided to move on.

PERFORMANCE AP MIRROR RS 11 copia

Photo: Michael Cooper

But it all became true the day of the second show of the Stones in La Plata. A while before the concert began, as I was having a drink at the VIP area, once again I saw the lady I briefly spotted at the hotel the previous day, who now was about five meters from me, walking towards one of the tables. I was still quite dubious, I won’t deny it. More over, nobody attending the VIP seemed to notice that singular woman, elegantly dressed, with a hat, and walking with a cane. The possible fact it was actually her, going unnoticed by the others, no matter what, was also likely to happen. Only that she wasn’t on her own. Besides her was my friendAdam Cooper, which led me to start wondering if somehow I could have been wrong from the beginning. To anybody not familiar with his name, Adam is the son of Michael Cooper, the legendary photographer mostly famous for being the one who shot many of the English rock and pop stars in his home country during the ‘60s and ‘70s and, and even more important, for being the one who did the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Their Satanic Majesties Request covers. That’s right, those two album covers.

vip stones La Plata

Anita and me at the VIP in La Plata

Adam has been living in Buenos Aires for at least 20 years (where he organized many photo exhibitions showing his father’s works, as he also did abroad) and whom I’d first met shortly after his original arrival to Argentina. But long before that, when he was still the little boy living with his father in Chelsea, London, in the mid-‘60s, with his mum mostly out of the whole picture, and because of dad Michael’s friendship with the Stones, he had found a sort of surrogate mothers in both Marianne Faithfull and Anita Pallenberg. Not just one, but two, as if that weren’t enough. Marianne and Anita cuddled him, invited little Adam home to play, making him part of a memorable and amazing  cultural scene he would only become aware of as he got older. Plus the fact I knew Adam used to get in touch with them quite often after all these years, no matter the distance. This time there was no doubt that the woman my friend had seen by the hotel’s pool, or the one I’d seen at the lobby, was the same one. And that was Anita Pallenberg. I ended up swallowing my words, as I watched her chatting with Adam in the midst of the cacophonous rumble at the VIP area before the Stones’ second show in La Plata, while I slowly approached them. I greeted Adam and then introduced myself to Anita, telling her about my joy to see her visiting the country, and finally asked her to have a picture with her. Something against my own ethics, by the way. For some reason I never ever felt comfortable asking for a picture, period. Not only because I never found it right to invade anybody’s area, but actually mostly because a photograph without a story behind is nothing but that, an image born by ways of a lens and a button that’s pushed down, lacking naturalness, and turning out into a forced, artificial kind of situation. Without a before, without a during, and also lacking an after. Add to that I didn’t like the idea Anita could think I was just another fan looking for a picture to display on Facebook. Anita had always been one of my favorite female icons (that is, besides my devotion to the lives and times of the Stones, of which she played, needless to say, a major role in) So then Anita, the lady, gently said ‘yes’, displaying her trademark smile. It didn’t last for longer than 2 minutes, I’d say even less than that, and so I decided to leave them alone for better. I actually wouldn’t  have been interested in taking any pictures had I had the chance to talk to her instead, as talking always comes first. Out of there, away from the noise, and in the right place. I’d later apologize to my British friend for my stubborn reluctance to her story.

ANITA KONEX

Anita at the Michael Cooper’s 
exhibition at the Konex
(Photo: Adam Cooper)

Two days later, on Friday February 12, the weather was already awfully soaking wet by the time it dawned. The hottest February ever in history, according to the local meteorologists. There was still one final Stones’ show at La Plata’s Estadio Único next day but, once again, and despite the unbearable temperature, I had to go back to the Four Seasons to meet a fellow friend from New Zealand who was also in Buenos Aires for the Stones concerts. We had agreed to meet in the early afternoon but, given the weather conditions, I decided to leave from home earlier, which led me to arrive to the hotel before I expected. It was only a few minutes after my arriving to the Four Seasons that there I came across Adam again who, polite as usual, approached me to say hello. I asked him why he was there, and he replied he had an appointment with Anita, they were going to have lunch together at one of the hotel restaurants. I didn’t hesitate for a second, and next thing I was telling him how important it would be for me to finally have the chance to exchange a few words with her (more than a minute and a half, at least) now that we were in the right place to do so, away enough from the concert craziness.“Sure”, he said, “right now she must be coming down in the elevator” I confessed to him all I actually wanted (and whoever is reading this, please believe my very words) was just to walk them up to the restaurant table, and then I was done. As I said before, I’m not the kind of person who likes to interfere with anything, let alone something I wasn’t invited to in the first place. Anita showed up in a matter of seconds, elegantly dressed, bohemian style, in a leopard pattern printed dress and purse, flashing her classic smile. After greeting us gracefully, we started heading to the Nuestro Secreto restaurant, which can be accessed right from the very entrance of the mansion. Once again, I knew time would be never enough to have a proper chat, so far for me, but nevertheless I was happy enough to be with them and have a word in the meantime. Plus there was no way Anita could have remembered about our brief meeting at the stadium. We reached the restaurant five minutes later and, as promised, I said goodbye to them. That’s just when she unexpectedly invited me to have launch with her and Adam. “Aren’t you staying for lunch?” In the right place now. And in case it all happened because she felt sorry letting me go, she gave me another of those killer smiles confirming that she really meant she was inviting me to join them. “Oh, I’d love to stay!” “Sure, have a seat”, she confirmed, which I instantly agreed to while getting ready to be part of an unforgettable one-of-a-kind moment. I can’t actually remember now what we ordered to eat (quite weird for somebody as insanely thoughtful as me), but the three of us sure drank mineral water. Some details may always escape my mind. That’s the price one pays when you put much attention to a woman with an overwhelming personality like Anita had to say, someone who lived and survived (nearly) anything, when other personal issues take second place and you prioritize her knowledgeability above all, addressing literally any topic, which she proved to know quite much of.

Gerard-Malanga-Andy-Warhol-Edie-Sedgwick-Chuck-Wein-Anita-Pallenberg-guest

Gerard Malanga, Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Chuck Wein, Anita, and a guest. Warhol’s Factory times.

Readers may wonder why I didn’t ask her about all those facts and stories we read again and again over the years. But what was there to ask? And what would have been the outcome anyway? The answer is, they’re all pretty well-known, then why asking about them again? After all, this was no interview, this wasn’t me the journalist meeting her. No journalistic duties involved this time then, but just an informal and regular conversation. It was lovely and extremely funny  to enjoy Anita’s great sense of humor throughout the two hours or more we’d been there.  I just let it flow. Had it not been so, I would have sure asked her about the days when she was expelled from a German boarding school at 16, or her times at Andy Warhol’s Factory after she arrived to New York. Long before her entry into the world of the Rolling Stones, Anita was already a class A rebel with enough skills (out of her amazing physical beauty, she managed five languages) that she made best use of. That’s one of the reasons why listening to all she had to say was such an amazing experience. And although it was mostly English we talked (in Anita’s case, with a strong Italian accent), she would often come up with a few single words in a different language. She told us how much she loved the hot weather above all, and that she was always running away from the cold. That’s why, she explained, she shared her time in at least four different destinations in the world, mostly in Keith Richards’ house in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, “where the weather was always nice”, or in other places that also belonged to Keith , like the Redlands country house in West Wittering (located in West Sussex, England, yes, which was scene of the famous February 1967 police raid) or the one in Cheyne Walk, right by London’s Chelsea Embankment (where she started living with Keith in 1969), or even her native city of Rome where, as much as I remember, she told me she used to have, or still had a sister living there.

PERFORMANCE MJ & AP PERFORMANCE RS 4

Anita and Mick Jagger during the shooting of “Performance” (1968)

Clouds of artificial smoke coming out of her electronic cigarette, extremely tanned and with her skin slightly wrinkled, the then 73-year-old Anita still carried the sex appeal that had been a permanent trademark all though her life. And whereas she no longer had that fresh beauty so typical of her when she was younger, her particular way of speaking, coupled with an established femininity, still made her a very attractive woman. And that halo all around her! There’s something rather strange that always happened to me whenever I had the chance to meet somebody I admired, or wished I’d ever meet in person, being it for an interview or, such as in this opportunity, that of a fortuitous encounter, and that’s in a way or another, I always feel that person isn’t actually there in front of me, in spite getting this endless collage of images and intermingled stories that remain away from what is really happening at the very moment you’re talking to them. It mostly felt like it every time I had the chance to meet somebody with a heavy history behind, that I really admired, or meant a lot to me. That’s when I’m not able to separate all that from the true reality, as redundant as that may sound. It’s like one dimension within another, while both get constantly blurred on the fly. For that reason, meeting Anita had little to do with the actual fact of being there with her, instead making me feel I was watching an unlimited short film where the thousands of images of her I saw over the years, being them photographs or footage, came one after another non-stop, taking me to a parallel dimension. Which is a probably the same that could happen to anybody into the lives and times of the Rolling Stones, as it’s undeniable that Anita Pallenberg epitomizes a crucial element in the band’s history. Because, to put it this way, if there’s no certain amount of danger involved, there’s no rock and roll at all. And I’ve always believed Brian and Anita were the first ones to come up with that pinch of danger in the Stones, something which they’d go along with in their formative years and beyond. Brian gave the Stones their original style and attitude, anticipating which would come later, while Anita with her piercing gaze and dangerousbad girl aura was just the icing on the cake, an irresistible dish on the table.

keith-richards-anita-pallenberg-1024x694

Brian Jones, Anita and Keith in Tangiers, Morocco, 1967

That’s the main reason why, all through the lunch, I wasn’t essentially able to take my eyes off her, while another shot of a thousand images crossed my mind, and all that now taking place only a few inches from me. All those pictures of she and Keith, Anita seducing Mick while shooting Performance (which led to the very first rift between the Glimmer Twins), Anita “the Great Tyrant” who controls the underground city where Jane Fonda landed in Roger Vadim‘s science fiction film Barbarella, or another of her film roles, in A Degree of Murder, which original movie soundtrack by ex boyfriend Brian Jones remains unreleased to this day. Instead, I chose to look and listen to her, while (once again) that endless number of images kept going through my head with Anita in the leading role, the Stones’ muse par excellence, and no way it could stop. The full blooded “it girl” during much of the ‘60s and ‘70s, who after all this time couldn’t help but give you a crushing smile, that very one an English magazine once referred to as “that witchy smile”, the kind of girl everybody wanted to have.

barbarella

On the set of “Barbarella” (1968)

It’s noon and it’s summer and in this restaurant in a fancy hotel in Buenos Aires here’s the woman whose veins have seen vast doses of opiates go by, when being a junkie had to do only with one’s own decisions, and not because of a snobbish pose to satisfy a photographer’s eye. The one who was part of the whole thing behind “Sympathy for the Devil” during a pivotal year, when many people started considering Anita “the sixth Stone”. “Is it true that all those ​​’oohs, ooh, oohs’ in the song was your idea?” I’d rather refrain from asking her. She may not be interested in setting the record straight, or in reviewing other pages of her past, which she makes clear when, after my suggesting she should write her autobiography some day, she honestly replies “I can’t remember anything”. It was a short way of explaining the true story behind her answer, her actual reluctance to do so as, since “all that the publishers want are the stories with some scandal involved” Neither it was needed to discuss her contribution to the Stones’ mystique. It was enough of her to express her unconditional love for the band’s history, of which now wonders about its fans, “Don’t they realize they’re already grown-ups and that they need to have some rest after a show?” Now it’s Anita who’s shooting questions. “Sure”, I said, “but I guess there’s nothing we can do about it” And then she smiles back, followed by another puff from her electronic cigarette. Later on she would refer to the Toronto 1977 days, when she and Richards got arrested at the airport after customs searched their luggage and found out they were carrying drugs. Well, you all know the story. Richards would get his visa back after a while, which allowed him entrance to the USA, while Anita had to wait for many years. “That was the worst time of my life”, she would confess, as we ordered more mineral water. Interestingly, she proposed talking about the current political scene in Argentina at the time, when we tried to explain to her that our previous government had restricted the local population to get any foreign currency for many years, a subject she suddenly changed to express her love for her children and grandchildren. Adam had invited Anita to visit Early Stones, by Michael Cooper, the photo exhibition featuring his father’s works which was currently taking place at Ciudad Cultural Konex that very afternoon once we finished our lunch. With just one last Stones show in Buenos Aires to go, and with no intentions to follow the rest of the Latin American tour (“I’m not following it, after Buenos Aires I’m going back to Jamaica”) we finally left the restaurant and headed for the exhibition, where Adam was honoring his father once again displaying pictures from the Stones’ early years, which Anita had been an essential part of.

Anita y Silvia Cooper, esposda de Adam, en la muestra en el Konex

Another picture of Anita at the Konex, with Silvia Cooper, Adam’s wife (Photo: Adam Cooper)

Before jumping on the elevator that would take us back to the ground floor of the hotel, I considered having a picture with her: “Anita, I hate to say this, but I’d love a picture of the day I met you” “Oh no, sorry, I’m not wearing any make-up”, she reacted, flashing another of her classic smiles. That’s when I realized that, after all, and against any logic, at least this time a thousand words would be worth an image. To my surprise, there came an unexpected bonus. By the time we got to the main entrance of the Four Seasons, amidst some 35-odd degrees, Adam asked us to wait for him outside as there was something else he needed to do, which turned into about 10 minutes of me and Anita all alone sitting on one of the benches right by one of the hotel doors.  Under the blazing sun, she asked me to get her another bottle of water. I was back with the bottle in a matter of seconds to find her taking one of her Camels from her purse, then tasting it like it was her first cigarette that day.

With director Volker Schlondorff during the filming

With director Volker Schlondorff during the filming of “A Degree of Murder” (1967)

I kept asking questions to her, one right after another, until from a cloud of smoke that made her look like in the days of Nellcote, she boldly said:“Are you gonna keep asking me questions all the time?” Oops. “Sorry, I cannot think of any other way to talk to you, Anita”, I honestly acknowledged. Then, a few minutes later, when I took out my pack of Marlboros and offered her one saying “Would you like a cigarette?”,unsuccessfully  trying not to make it sound like a question as much as possible (is there any other grammar way of saying so, after all?), she laughed histerically. “You said your name is Marcelo and that your family came from Italy, so what’s your last name?” Now it was Anita who asked the questions. “Sonaglioni, Marcelo Sonaglioni, and you know what, I never got to find out the story behind my last name and…” She stopped me. “¡Marcelo Sonaglioni!”, she said in a loud voice, like she was introducing me to an audience. “That’s the name of an Italian serpent!”, she assured, while I enjoyed my cigarette with Anita Pallenberg in the thick of more clouds of smoke, the girl whose ex boyfriend Keith Richards once dedicated the song “You Got the Silver”to, definitely as much dazzled as I felt now. With Adam back into scene, it was time to leave for the Konex, but I decided not to join the party this time, as I still had to meet my friend, as previously arranged. Anita grabbed my arm and I walked her up to the car. “Oh, aren’t you coming?”, she said. “Unfortunately I can’t, but I look forward to seeing you again soon. And thanks for an amazing time!” Hugs and kisses were exchanged, before she and Adam left in a taxi on their way to dad Michael’s exhibition.
Just last year, as I was about to travel to England, an interview with Anita had been almost confirmed (where I would have asked her all those questions I had in mind and had to keep to myself the day we had lunch), but then I was informed she broke one of her ribs, so it was postponed for another time, which now won’t ever happen.

88414-mordundtotschlag_fotos_werkfotos_sw_andyboulton_3_5_3_01-ii_016

The news first published by the Italian newspaper La Stampa on last June 13 was a bolt from the blue. Even though she had been experiencing several health issues over the last few years, Anita’s body clock finally determined it was time to stop. She died peacefully surrounded by her loved ones in a Chichester hospital, in West Sussex, not far from Redlands. How the world turns, before we got the shocking news I had already arranged to meet up with Adam on Wednesday, just a day after Anita passed away. We didn’t cancel it at all. Adam was already there when I got to the bar. He was really down, and quite sad and shaken. “You know, that was like losing my mother, because Anita was like a substitute mother to me…”, he told me. We realized we didn’t feel like talking anything, but about Anita. “Did you see Keith’s post on Facebook?”, Adam asked. “It reads ‘A most remarkable woman. Always in my heart.’ ”. Keith’s heartfelt post also included a picture of Anita, looking incredibly beautiful, originally shot by his father Michael. Adam was almost in tears. We ended up unwinding ourselves, like in all the wakes, a nice way to remember  the people we love, while I kept reminding him about the many stories we lived the day we had lunch with Anita, when both of us saw her for the last time, something I will thank Adam for forever.

DOS HORAS -Y ALGO MÁS- CON ANITA PALLENBERG

Standard
Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 24 de junio de 2017

“¿Te querés quedar a almorzar con nosotros?” ¿Cómo decirle no a semejante invitación cuando la propuesta parte de la mismísima Anita Pallenberg? Sucedió el año pasado, durante los días de la hasta ahora cuarta y última visita de los Rolling Stones a Buenos Aires como parte del Olé Tour, la gira latinoamericana que había comenzado unos días antes en Santiago de Chile, y que se extendería por diez  fechas más culminando con una presentación en La Habana, Cuba, a modo de broche de oro. Para la ocasión, y a fines de que los fans no desborden los accesos al hotel o incluso terminen acampando a sus alrededores, esta vez el equipo de logística del grupo había designado una nueva estrategia: separar a los miembros de la banda en diferentes destinos. Jagger se alojó en el Palacio Duhau Park Hyatt y Ronnie Wood en el Hotel Faena, mientras que el Four Seasons (donde la primera plana stoniana sí se había instalado en su totalidad en todas sus visitas anteriores, ocupando la mansión Álzaga Unzué) fue la base de operaciones de Charlie Watts y Keith Richards. Y también parte de esta anécdota, recuerdo informal -y emocionado- de un fan. 
 
Tal como se viene observando desde hace al menos un cuarto de siglo, a medida que los Stones se hacían mayores y sumaban hijos a sus familias la tradición de llevarlos de gira junto a ellos acabó convirtiéndose en un hecho folklórico. Hijos, esposas y hasta padres (en la primera visita de la banda al país, en 1995, fue el mismísimo Bert Richards, padre de Keith, quien también se paseó por estos lares) terminaron sumándose al equipo de gira que los Stones arrastran a su paso por el planeta. Pero nunca sus ex-mujeres. Por eso me tomé todo el atrevimiento posible de pecar de escéptico cuando una amiga inglesa que había venido a Sudamérica para presenciar algunos de los shows del tour -que, al igual que los Stones, también se estaba alojando en el Four Seasons- me confesó haber visto esa tarde a Anita Pallenberg en la pileta del hotel. Se lo refuté desde el vamos. “¿Anita? Imposible”, le dije. “Anita no viaja con el grupo desde hace mínimamente 35 años, al menos desde que cortó relaciones directas con Keith. Y aún cuando estaban juntos, jamás fue de seguir las giras. Debés haber visto a alguien muy parecida”. Y mucho menos en Sudamérica, me decía para mis adentros. Le pregunté insistentemente si había trabado conversación con ella. “No, no hablé”, me confesó, “pero te aseguro que era Anita. Estaba nadando a mi lado, tenía un traje de baño de leopardo…”. Podría haber continuado rechazándole toda posibilidad de veracidad del hecho explícitamente, queen lo que a mi refiere nada me iba a convencer que estaba en un perfecto error. Al fin y al cabo, me dije, todo el mundo ve gente “parecida a” por todas partes.
 
ANITA EN ARGENTINA. La última vez que Anita Pallenberg había visitado estos hemisferios fue para las navidades de 1968, cuando en ocasión de un crucero de placer junto a Richards, Marianne Faithfull y su por entonces novio Mick Jagger, el insigne cuarteto  desembarcó en Brasil, donde pasaron sus vacaciones en las ciudades de Matão  (en el interior del estado de São Paulo, donde Richards se inspiró para componer “Honky Tonk Women”), Rio y Bahia, antes de dirigirse por unos días más a Perú. Por esos años Anita ya se había convertido en la compañera de vida oficial de Keith luego de que en 1967 el guitarrista de los Stones la “rescatara” de los brazos de su co-equiper Brian Jones, su pareja original, con quien compartió una relación idílica hasta que el pelirrojo guitarrista, presa de la paranoia y desbordado de adicciones, comenzara a ejercer la violencia física sobre ella. La teoría de mi amiga sobre el avistaje de Anita en Buenos Aires 48 años más tarde de aquella oportunidad era, cuando menos, inimaginable. Sin embargo, quiso el destino que mientras me paseaba por el lobby del hotel al día siguiente, aguardando el encuentro con otro amigo que también se alojaba allí, pude ver a una mujer de rasgos muy similares a los de Anita  (por lo menos la Anita de esos días, con cuya imagen de “señora mayor” estaba familiarizado tras haber visto unas fotos recientes en alguna página de noticias), la cual rápidamente salió de uno de los ascensores para dirigirse a otro sector del hotel. La escena no duró más de medio segundo, y pensando si al fin y al cabo no había sido producto de mi imaginación o -en el mejor de los casos- si no se trataba simplemente de alguien con un gran parecido, opté por olvidarme del asunto.

PERFORMANCE AP MIRROR RS 11 copia

Foto: Michael Cooper

Pero la ilusión terminó convirtiéndose en hecho el día del segundo de los tres shows de los Stones en la Plata. En momentos previos al conciertos, mientras me encontraba en el sector VIP del evento, vi cómo esa señora tan parecida a Anita que el día anterior me había llamado la atención saliendo del ascensor del hotel era ni más ni menos la que ahora, a unos cinco metros de distancia, se dirigía a una de las mesas del VIP. Nada iba a tirar por la borda mi escepticismo, para qué negarlo. Más aún, ninguno de los muchos asistentes al recinto parecía haber puesto la mirada en la distinguida dama en cuestión, lo cual mantenía la improbabilidad de la situación: había pasado inadvertida ante los ojos de los demás asistentes, lo cual tampoco hubiera resultado nada improbable. Claro que la señora que se parecía a Anita iba acompañada de mi amigo Adam Cooper, y eso significaba un giro de 180 grados en lo que tozudamente negaba desde el vamos. Para aquellos que no están familiarizados con su nombre, Adam es hijo de Michael Cooper, legendario fotógrafo inglés que retrató como pocos la escena del rock de su país de origen de los 60 y buena parte de los 70 y, entre otras grandes obras, el responsable de las portadas  de los célebres álbumes “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” y de “Their Satanic Majesties Request”. Nada más y nada menos.

vip stones La Plata

Anita y el autor de esta nota: tiempos de sector VIP en La Plata, antes del más reciente show de los Stones

UN ENCUENTRO CON ADAM. Adam vive en Buenos Aires desde hace al menos dos décadas (muchos recordarán las varias exhibiciones fotográficas que organizó con buena parte de la obra de su padre), y a quien yo ya había conocido por aquellos tiempos,  poco después de su arribo al país. Pero mucho antes de todo eso, cuando todavía era el niño que vivía junto a su padre en el Chelsea londinense de mediados de los 60, Adam, de madre original prácticamente ausente, a través de la amistad y cercanía permanente de papá Michael con los Stones había encontrado en Marianne Faithfull  y Anita Pallenberg una suerte de madres sustitutas. Dos, a falta de una. Marianne y Anita lo mimaban, lo invitaban a jugar a sus casas, haciéndolo formar parte de una escena cultural histórica de la cual sólo tomaría conciencia con el correr de los años. Y yo sabía que Adam se mantenía en contacto con ellas, a pesar del paso del tiempo y también de la distancia. Ya no quedaba espacio para dudas: aquella señora que mi amiga había visto en la piscina del hotel, o la tan parecida a Anita que yo había divisado por un microsegundo en el lobby del lugar, era finalmente Anita Pallenberg.

Tuve que tragarme mis palabras, más que nunca ahora que la veía charlando con Adam en medio del alboroto generalizado del VIP, mientras me dirigía sigilosamente hacia ellos con la intención de plasmar algún tipo de recuerdo en mi memoria. Saludé a Adam y me presenté ante Lady Anita; le manifesté mi alegría de verla de visita en el país y, finalmente, le pregunté si podía tomarme una foto con ella, algo que resultaba ir en contra de mi propia ética. Por una serie de motivos, siempre me pareció mal pedir fotos. No sólo porque nunca me pareció correcto invadir el tránsito de nadie, sino más aún porque una foto sin una historia que la produzca es simplemente eso, una imagen capturada por un lente y un botón que la dispara; un momento que carece de naturalidad, forzado y artificial, de tantos de esos que hoy día suelen pulular en las redes sociales, para efímero placer de sus protagonistas de la era del vacío, sin un antes, sin un mientras y sin un después. Tampoco quería que Anita pensara que era simplemente “otro fan” acumulador de fotos, pero al mismo tiempo sabía que la tiranía del tiempo no me iba a permitir declararle mi admiración por su persona (Anita siempre fue uno de mis íconos femeninos favoritos, más allá de mi eterna devoción por las vidas y los tiempos de los Stones, de los que ella es parte fundamental) y que esa posible fotografía, reitero, no iba a ser más que el retrato de un instante de estilo pasajero. Y entonces Anita, la dama, accedió gentilmente, exhibiendo su sonrisa resplandeciente marca registrada a través de los años. Bastó con menos de dos minutos, el tiempo exacto que me indicó que hubiera renunciado a toda fotografía de haber podido ocuparlos para intercambiar unas palabras y así poder sondear su mirada con más detenimiento.  Fuera de ahí, fuera del ruido, y en el marco indicado.  Más tarde le pediría a mi amiga británica disculpas por mi capacidad de descreimiento ante ciertas aseveraciones…

ANITA KONEX

Anita posando en el Konex  (Foto: Adam Cooper)

ALMORZANDO CON ANITA. Dos días más tarde, aquel 12 de febrero de 2016 amaneció con un clima insoportable, siendo el segundo mes del año más caluroso en la historia del distrito, tal como lo confirmaban los meteorólogos. Aún restaba un tercer y último concierto de los Stones en el Estadio Único de La Plata el sábado, pero una vez más, y a pesar de la temperatura sofocante, tuve que volver al Four Seasons para encontrarme con un amigo neozelandés que también vino al país para asistir a los shows. Minutos después de mi llegada al lugar, me topé nuevamente con Adam, tan amable como siempre, que se acercó a saludarme. Le pregunté a qué se debía su visita, y con toda la parsimonia posible me contestó que estaba allí para almorzar con Anita en el restaurante del hotel. No titubeé ni por un instante y le manifesté lo importante que sería para mí poder intercambiar unas palabras con ella, ahora que sí estábamos en el marco adecuado, bien lejos de la agitación de rigor previa a un concierto. “Claro que sí”, me aseguró, “debe estar bajando en el ascensor”. Agregué que todo lo que deseaba (y quien sea que esté leyendo estas líneas, créame que fue meramente así) era quizás acompañarlos hasta la mesa, saludarla nuevamente y despedirme. Remarco una vez más que no me gusta interceptar ninguna situación que no me competa.

Anita apareció en cuestión de instantes, elegantemente vestida, de bohemio estilo, vestido y cartera de leopardo  y sombrero beige, apoyándose en un bastón para caminar, tan refinada como siempre, con su enorme sonrisa. Nos saludó, y segundos después nos encaminamos a Nuestro Secreto, el restó al cual se accede directamente desde la entrada de La Mansión. Sabía que el tiempo nuevamente iba a resultar escaso, al menos desde mis posibilidades, pero como fuera, estaba más que conforme con poder acompañarlos hasta el lugar y de paso intercambiar unas palabras. Desde ya, no había manera de que recordara nuestro veloz encuentro anterior, ni tampoco necesidad de refrescarle la memoria. Por eso, cuando finalmente arribamos al lugar del almuerzo, cumpliendo con lo prometido, me despedí. Fue cuando Anita me propuso lo inesperado, invitándome a quedarme a compartir el encuentro junto a ella y Adam. En el lugar justo, en el momento indicado. Y por si aún existía la posibilidad de aceptar la invitación sólo por un motivo de suerte, me regaló otra de sus sonrisas fulgurantes una vez que asentí y me senté junto a ellos para disfrutar de un momento inolvidable. No recuerdo qué pedimos, lo cual resulta raro para alguien tan detallista como yo, pero sí que los tres invitados bebimos agua mineral. Algunos pormenores, aunque mínimos, simplemente se escapan. Es el precio que se paga por poner mucha más atención en lo que una charla relajada con una mujer de personalidad avasallante depara. Es lo menos que puede suceder al comunicarse con alguien que lo vivió (casi) todo, y con la cual prácticamente todo dato histórico de rigor termina resultando secundario ante su enorme cultura y su disponibilidad.

Gerard-Malanga-Andy-Warhol-Edie-Sedgwick-Chuck-Wein-Anita-Pallenberg-guest

Gerard Malanga, Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Chuck Wein, Anita Pallenberg y una invitada.

HISTORIA VIVA Y HUMO ELECTRÓNICO. El lector podrá preguntarse cómo es que no abordé ninguno de los temas o hechos  relevantes que Anita cosechó a lo largo de su vida. Vaya como respuesta que simplemente por ser datos conocidos, la necesidad de preguntarle por ellos hubiera resultado absolutamente innecesaria. Y que después de todo, aquí no había ninguna entrevista de por medio, ninguna misión periodística ni informativa, sino una charla distendida con toda la informalidad que ameritaba (fue adorable disfrutar de su poderoso sentido del humor a través de las casi 2 horas que duró el almuerzo), y dejar que, sencillamente, fluya. De no haber resultado así seguramente le hubiera preguntado por los días en que fue expulsada de una escuela de pupilos a los 16 años para acabar bandeándose por algunas de las grandes capitales europeas, o su experiencia en New York como parte del grupo selecto que poblaba The Factory bajo la batuta de Andy Warhol. Mucho antes de su ingreso a las filas de los Rolling Stones, Anita ya era una rebelde empedernida, un destino natural rico en virtudes y sensaciones varias (fuera de su asombrosa belleza física, manejaba cinco idiomas) que supo explotar del mismo modo. Es por tal motivo que escucharla hablar resultara tan extremadamente simpático y, fuera del inglés que dominó la charla (caracterizado por un fuerte acento mitad italiano- mitad alemán) cada tanto proponía alguna frase o palabra en otra de las lenguas que dominaba. Nos confesaba su predilección por el clima caluroso, y su huída cada vez que llegaba el frío al lugar que estaba habitando. Es que Anita repartía su tiempo viviendo en al menos cuatro destinos en el mundo, principalmente en la casa propiedad de Keith Richards en Ocho Ríos, Jamaica, donde el clima no le resultaba problema alguno, y escapándose de los otros paraderos también del mismo dueño (la histórica casa de Keith de Redlands en Sussex, Inglaterra, o la de la calle Cheyne Walk en el Chelsea Embankment londinense, o de su Roma natal, de donde recuerdo señaló haber tenido, o seguir teniendo una hermana que vivía allí). Todo entre permanentes bocanadas de humor artificial disparadas por su cigarrillo electrónico.

PERFORMANCE MJ & AP PERFORMANCE RS 4

Anita y Mick Jagger en el rodaje de “Performance” (1968)

ESA VIEJA MAGIA. Extremadamente bronceada, y con la piel algo arrugada a su edad, a sus 71 años de edad Anita aún mantenía el sex appeal que había sido su sello natural personal. Y si bien ya no contaba con la belleza física que la caracterizó, su peculiar forma de hablar, sumada a sus clásicos modales y su femineidad establecida, continuaban siendo parte de una personalidad atractiva en todo momento, con un halo que estaba a la misma altura.  Hay algo suficientemente raro que siempre me sucedió cuando tuve que estar frente a algún personaje histórico que me haya tocado conocer en persona, ya sea en situación de una entrevista o, como fue en este caso, el de un encuentro fortuito, y que es de alguna manera sentir que la persona en cuestión en realidad no se encuentra físicamente allí, tornándose todo el tiempo un collage interminable de imágenes y historias entremezcladas (las mismas que uno siempre contempló, las mismas que terminaron forjando al personaje en cuestión), y alejándose de lo que realmente está pasando en el autentico momento del encuentro. Básicamente me ocurrió con cualquier figura de peso que tuve oportunidad de conocer, y que, así las cosas, no logré separar de la verdadera realidad, con todo lo redundante que la frase pueda significar. Es como una dimensión dentro de otra, mientras ambas se desdibujan constantemente sobre la marcha. Por tal motivo, estar con Anita poco tuvo que ver con el hecho en sí, pero con un cortometraje ilimitado por donde figuraron las mil y una imágenes de ella que uno cierta vez presenció con el correr de los años, en fotografías o material en video. Que es lo mismo que le podría haber sucedido a un adorador de la carrera de los Rolling Stones, porque es innegable que Anita Pallenberg simboliza un elemento fundamental de la iconografía central de la banda. Porque si no existe una cuota de peligro (lejos de cualquier posibilidad amenazante, sino respecto a la situación de tensión que el género debe esencialmente conservar), el rock no es rock. Y Brian y Anita fueron los progenitores del estilo de la banda desde esa coyuntura original en sus años formativos. El primero aportó la imagen original y la actitud estilística de casi todo lo que llegaría después, y la inquietante Anita, con su mirada penetrante y su porte natural original de bad girl, fue la cereza en la torta para un plato irresistible de uno de los menúes centrales en toda buena mesa.

keith-richards-anita-pallenberg-1024x694

Brian Jones, Anita y Keith Richards: el triángulo original

MIL Y UNA PERFORMANCES. Por esa y mil razones más, a lo largo del almuerzo no logré quitar la mirada de su persona y ese halo inexplicable, mientras por mi mente desfilaban otros tantos millares de postales a los que uno asistió y que ahora se materializaban en la mesa de un restaurante. Aquellas de Anita junto a Keith en todas esas ocasiones que haría falta un archivo aparte para atesorar, Anita cortejando amorosamente a Mick en el film “Performance” (y la guerra de situaciones internas en la dupla Jagger/Richards que esa circunstancia produjo), Anita la “Gran Tirana” que  controla la ciudad subterránea donde aterriza Jane Fonda en la película “Barbarella” (mientras el director Roger Vadim luchaba por manejar sus emociones comandando los roles de dos de las mujeres más bellas del planeta), o en otro de sus roles fílmicos, el del largometraje “A Degree of Murder”, cuya banda original de sonido a cargo de su ex Brian Jones continúa permaneciendo inédita. Preferí inclinarme al viejo arte de la observación, mientras por mi cabeza seguía cruzándose un sinfín de imágenes imposible de detener protagonizadas por la musa stoniana por excelencia, e “it girl” de cepa durante buena parte de los años 60 y 70 (eso que los diccionarios definen como la frase informal para referirse a la mujer bella y de estilo poseedora de sex appeal sin la necesidad de lucir su sexualidad), que a pesar del paso del tiempo y las arrugas no lograba evitar una sonrisa irresistible a la que alguna vez una revista de moda británica citó como “esa sonrisa de bruja”. O la chica que todos querían tener.

barbarella

Anita en el film “Barbarella” (1968)

EL LIBRO QUE NUNCA FUE. En este mediodía estival en el restaurante de un lujoso hotel de Buenos Aires estaba la mujer por cuyas venas circularon vastas correntadas de opiáceos, cuando ser un yonqui respondía exclusivamente a una decisión propia y no a una pose snob celebrada por los lentes de las cámaras. La del aporte definitivo a la concepción de la canción “Sympathy For The Devil”, en lo que determinara un año clave en la imaginería del grupo del cual muchos la consideraban “el sexto Stone”. “¿Es verdad que la idea de los ‘oohs, ooh, oohs’ de esa canción fueron idea tuya?”… Prefiero abstenerme de preguntárselo. Posiblemente no le interesara aclararme nada de eso, ni repasar viejas páginas de su historia, lo que decididamente dejó en claro cuando se me ocurrió sugerirle por qué no escribir una autobiografía alguna vez, y a lo que respondió “Porque no me acuerdo de nada”. Fue una manera rápida y concisa de explicar la verdadera historia detrás de la respuesta, que es la de su reticencia declarada a no hacerlo, previendo que cualquier editor posible sólo lo hubiera hecho con el mero interés de ofrecerle a los lectores historias de neto corte amarillista, las que seguramente hubieran vendido cantidades de copias, pero que a cambio hubieran pasado por alto otros capítulos que la hubieran definido más acertadamente. Tampoco fue necesario repasar su aporte fundamental a la mística de los Stones, entonces. Bastó y sobró con dejar que se expresara por sí misma, declarando su amor incondicional por la historia del grupo y que ahora, de grande, se preguntaba cada vez que presencia las escenas de fanatismo adonde los Stones se dirijan: “¿No se dan cuenta que ya son tipos grandes y que cuando vuelven de un concierto necesitan irse a dormir y descansar?” Esta vez fue ella quien me formuló una pregunta. “Seguramente”, respondí, “pero no creo que podamos hacer mucho al respecto”. Me devolvió una sonrisa, como las tantas otras que se dieron durante la charla, seguida de otra bocanada de humo artificial.
Tampoco faltarían sus comentarios sobre los días en Toronto de 1977, cuando fue detenida junto a Richards en el aeropuerto de la ciudad tras habérseles encontrado una buena cantidad de heroína, lo que casi le vale al guitarrista una temporada tan extensa en la cárcel como para haber puesto fin a la mismísima carrera de los Stones. Richards lograría la emisión de un nuevo visado que le permitió regresar a los Estados Unidos tiempo después, situación que a Anita, habitante de su esfera personal ante todo y sin contar con los mismas ventajas que la fama de un músico puede traer aparejadas, le valió al menos una década y media sin poder retornar a aquel país. “Fue el peor momento de mi vida”, nos confesaría, mientras ordenábamos otra botella de agua mineral.  Más curioso aún fue cuando propuso abordar un repaso breve sobre la situación política argentina del momento, que entre cambios de gobierno y explicaciones en vano sobre la medida del “cepo” monetario de la administración anterior (y donde no faltó más de un “¿por qué?”), prefirió cambiar de tema para dejar en claro cuánto amaba a sus hijos y a sus nietos. El plan posterior al almuerzo iba a ser el que tenía previamente agendado, la invitación de Adam a que visite “Early Stones, by Michael Cooper”, la exhibición con fotografías de los Stones tomadas por su padre que Adam estaba llevando adelante por esos días en el espacio Ciudad Cultural Konex, a la que Anita había prometido visitar aquella tarde y de la cual iba a ser invitada ilustre para revisar en persona buena parte de su historia, enfrentándose a imágenes de las cual ella también formaba parte. Con solo un show más de los Stones pendiente a tener lugar al día siguiente, y dejando de sumarse al resto de la gira latinoamericana (“no la voy a seguir, después de aquí regreso a Jamaica”) abandonamos el recinto para emprender camino a la muestra de imágenes en blanco y negro en la que Adam, lleno de emoción, homenajeaba una vez más a su padre y al temprano mundillo Stone del que Pallenberg había sido pieza fundamental.

Anita y Silvia Cooper, esposda de Adam, en la muestra en el Konex

En la muestra del Konex junto a Silvia, esposa de Adam (Foto: Adam Cooper)

FUMANDO AL SOL. Antes de tomar el ascensor que nos iba a llevar a la planta baja del hotel barajé la chance de tomarme una fotografía con ella: “Anita, odio pedir fotos, pero me gustaría que nos tomemos una como recuerdo de lo que para mí fue gran momento”; “No, que no tengo puesto nada de maquillaje”, me contestó sinceramente, valiéndose de otra de sus sonrisas arquetípicas. Fue cuando deduje que, después de todo, y desafiando la lógica, al menos por esta vez las mil palabras iban a valer más que una imagen. Claro que mucho menos me esperaba que la jornada todavía me tuviera deparada un bonus inesperado. Fue cuando al llegar a la puerta principal de ingreso al Four Seasons, inmersos en una temperatura que para esa hora ya había superado los 35 grados reales, Adam nos pidió que lo esperemos un momento. El momento finalmente terminó extendiéndose por algo más de diez minutos, en los que Anita y yo nos quedamos a solas sentados en uno de los bancos de la entrada del hotel. Bajo un sol abrasador, me pidió que le consiga otra botella de agua mineral. Volví a estar sentado junto a ella en tiempo record, mientras sacaba un Camel de su cartera para saborearlo como si fuera el primer cigarrillo del día de todo fumador empedernido.

With director Volker Schlondorff during the filming

Con el director Volker Schlondorff, durante la filmación de “A Degree of Murder” (1967)

PREGUNTAS VS. RESPUESTAS. Continué haciéndole preguntas, una tras otra, hasta que, en medio de la nube de humo que la hacía verse como en una postal de Nellcote de 1972, me disparó contundentemente: “¿Pensás seguir haciéndome preguntas todo el tiempo?”. “No sé de qué otra manera dirigirme”, le reconocí con todo el peso de la verdad, por lo que minutos después, cuando saque mi atado de Marlboro y le ofrecí uno  diciendo “¿Querés un cigarrillo?”, evitando que suene a pregunta sin posibilidades de éxito (¿acaso había otra forma gramatical de hacerlo?), se rió histéricamente. “Me dijiste que te llamabas Marcelo y que tu familia paterna provenía de Italia, pero cuál es tu apellido?”. Ahora era ella la que preguntaba. “Sonaglioni, Marcelo Sonaglioni”, le apunté. “Y sabés qué,  jamás pude saber el origen detrás de mi apellido y…” Me interrumpió. “¡Marcelo Sonaglioni!”, exclamó en perfecto italiano, con un tono de celebración como si hubiese estado anunciando mi nombre ante una audiencia. “Tu apellido tiene que ver con el nombre de una serpiente italiana”, me aseguró convencida, mientras yo disfrutaba de mi cigarrillo fumando a solas junto a Anita Pallenberg, la chica a la que su ex novio Keith Richards le había dedicado “You Got the Silver” tan deslumbrado como yo. Surgió la invitación para ir con ella y Adam al Konex, una nueva aventura a la que no pude sumarme para poder cumplir con el compromiso original que tenía para esa tarde. Anita me tomó del brazo y la acompañé hasta el auto. “¿No venís?”, me preguntó. “Desafortunadamente no puedo hacerlo ahora, pero espero verte nuevamente, y gracias por un almuerzo inolvidable”, atiné a decirle. Intercambiamos abrazos y besos, antes de que el taxi de Anita y Adam partiera rumbo a la exhibición fotográfica de papá Michael. El año pasado, con motivo de un viaje personal a Londres, había logrado tramitar una entrevista con Anita en la que esa vez seguramente no iban a faltar todas las preguntas que me hubiera gustado formularle el día del almuerzo, pero poco antes sufrió la rotura de una costilla, por lo que debió ser cancelada para una futura oportunidad que ahora, dado el rigor de los acontecimientos sucedidos, no podrá tener lugar.

 


EPÍLOGO.
La noticia publicada primeramente por el diario italiano La Stampa el martes 13 de junio pasado cayó como un balde de agua helada. Si bien eran de conocimiento los diversos problemas de salud que venía enfrentando en los últimos años, el reloj biológico de Anita Pallenberg marcó que era la hora de cambiar de escena. Falleció rodeada de familiares en un hospital de Chichester, la ciudad británica al oeste de Sussex, muy cerca de su amada Redlands, donde vivió algunas de sus más recordadas páginas a la que ahora se agregó un último capítulo definitivo. Por esas vueltas del destino, días antes de la noticia de la muerte de Anita ya tenía pactado un encuentro con mi amigo Adam al día siguiente de lo sucedido. Cuando llegué al bar, Adam ya estaba esperándome. Se lo veía cabizbajo, notablemente conmovido, emocionado hasta las lágrimas. “Fue como perder a una madre, porque Anita fue como una madre sustituta para mi, ya sabés…” El motivo original del encuentro pasó a segundo plano, para terminar favoreciendo una charla dedicada exclusivamente a un ícono definitivo. “¿Leíste el mensaje de Keith en Facebook? ‘Una mujer notable. Siempre en mi corazón’”. El texto iba acompañado de una foto de Anita, invariablemente bella, que su padre Michael había plasmado. Adam tenía los ojos llenos de lágrimas. Terminamos relajándonos y sonriendo, como suele pasar en los velatorios, una distensión natural y necesaria que nos permite recordar a los seres que admiramos de manera más distendida, mientras no dejaba de mencionarle a mi estimado amigo todas las historias vividas aquel día del almuerzo junto a ella, cuando la vimos los dos por última vez, y del cual le estaré agradecido a Adam eternamente.
 
(Agradecimientos: Adam Cooper)

 

CONCIERTOS: HONEST JOHN PLAIN SE MOSTRÓ HONESTAMENTE ROCKERO EN EL SALÓN PUEYRREDÓN

Standard

HONEST JOHN PLAIN AND THE PIBES – SALÓN PUEYRREDÓN, 13/ 5/ 2017

1

Y sí, HJ cada tanto tiene los blues. Y los oranges y los purples y los yellows también (Foto: ©Anitta Ramone)

“Qué lindo es el rock’n’roll”. Parece el título de una canción de uno de esos gruposde kermesse, o de un festival de baile o de un club barrial de los ’70 pero, así y todo, con el rigor del peso de la simplicidad que amerita, la frase soltada por uno de los asistentes que colmó el Salón Pueyrredón para ver aHonest John Plain el sábado pasado acaba siendo la mejor declaración de principios para un show que cumplió a rajatabla con lo que se esperaba. No importó el horario. Plain había largado su concierto promediando las 2 AM palermitanas del día siguiente (antes habían pasado por el escenario los teloneros She-Ra, Angel Voodoo, Los Mareados yStarpunks, quienes calentaron el terreno apropiadamente) y el clima que se respiraba desde el vamos presagiaba una velada que prometía resultar encantadora.

NEW OLD BOY. “The Boy Is Back”, anunciaba el póster del evento en el cual una de las figuras más prominentes de la escena del rock inglesa de mediados de los 70 y que las vueltas de la vida llevaron a titular como “punk”, algo que el mismo Plain no dudó en cuestionar en la entrevista que MADHOUSE le realizara días antes del show, y que pueden ver aquí. Con las primeras notas de “Never Listen to Rumours” (la única canción que hasta ahora vio la luz del álbum que HJP grabó junto a un seleccionado de estrellas hace unos años, y que sigue inédito), la banda dejó en claro de antemano que las 18 canciones que restaban iban a estar perfectamente a la altura de las circunstancias. La primera sorpresa del set llegó de la mano de “All The Way To Hell And Back” (que abría “Rock On Sessions”, el segundo álbum de los Crybabys), y que se mantuvo muy fiel a la versión original de estudio.

TEMA VA, TEMA VIENE, LOS MUCHACHOS SE ENTRETIENEN. Lo que siguió fue un repaso detallado por la extensa carrera de Plain, basada principalmente en el catálogo de The Boys, con “Monotony” y “Scrubber” del álbum “Boys Only”, 1980, a los que se les agregaron “U.S.I.”, el recordado hit “Brickfield Nights” y “T.C.P.” (las tres grabadas en “Alternative Chartbusters”, segundo disco de la banda), “Kamikaze” y “Terminal Love” de “To Hell With The Boys” (1979), y aún tres más del álbum debut de la banda de 1977 comandadas por “I Don’t Care” (primer single del grupo), “Sick On You” (que inauguraba el LP) y “First Time”, que fue parte de los bises, cerrando el concierto.

2

HJ rockeándola en el Salón junto a lo’ Pibe’ (©Gux Ramone)

Campera de cuero y lentes oscuros permanentes (que Plain sólo amagó sacarse cada vez que le dirigía unas palabras al público), el repertorio también incluyó el cover de M.O.T.O “I Hate My Fucking Job”, “Where Have All The Good Girls Gone” (canción/título del álbum inicial de los Crybabys), “New Guitar In Town” que grabara en su paso por The Lurkers,“That’s Not Love” de “Honest John Plain & Friends” (1996) y “Punk Rock Girl” de “Punk Rock Menopause”, el disco reunión de The Boys editado hace 3 años, a lo que se sumaría el inesperado anuncio de “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”, la canción de la pluma Jagger/Richard -a la que anunció como “y ahora una canción de los fuckin’ Rolling Stones”-originalmente incluida en el primer álbum stoniano, y que Plain registrara en estudios junto a The Mattless Boys, uno de los incontables proyectos en los que participó. Brian Jones estaría más que agradecido.

3VAMOS LOS PIBES. Y si una auténtica obra de arte no está solamente determinada por el lienzo, sino también por el marco, seguramente la performance general del show no hubiera resultado tan buena sin la presencia del trío que lo secundó en escena, que para la ocasión recibió el título de “The Pibes” y que formó conJuan Papponetti (ex-Katarro Vandaliko, ahora en Traje Desastre) en guitarra y coros,Arnold Rock (ex-Tukera, hoy enDoble Fuerza) en bajo y coros, y Alejo Porcellana (ex-Shaila, hoy en día en Mamushkas) a la batería, los mismos que lo acompañaron a lo largo de las dos jornadas previas a la presentación en el Salón Pueyrredón, que tuvieron lugar en Tandil y Mar Del Plata. Tres shows seguidos en tres ciudades distintas a lo largo de tres días no está nada mal, y con apenas alguna que otra señal de cansancio para el hombre que hace 2 años casi pierde la vida por un desliz del destino. Por el resto, fue una noche inolvidable con un recinto colmado y con el deseo en común de ver a una leyenda viviente del rock frente a sus narices. En estado de pura efervescencia, a la hora correcta, con el clima indicado, y con la promesa que indica que en noviembre retornará una vez más al país con -ahora sí, los más mayorcitos- The Boys. O con los pibes originales… Al menos para la ocasión, las noches de Brickfield cambiaron de nombre para convertirse en argentinas y más precisamente aún en la del pasado sábado en Buenos Aires. Que se repita todas las veces que sea posible, rock mediante.

ANIVERSARIOS: A 52 AÑOS DE LA NOCHE EN QUE KEITH RICHARDS SOÑÓ “SATISFACTION”

Standard

Corría la primavera boreal de 1965 y los Rolling Stones estaban de gira por los Estados Unidos. Aquella noche del 7 de mayo la banda se alojaba en el motel Gulf, en Clearwater, estado de Florida, tras su concierto del día anterior en el Jack Russell Stadium de la misma ciudad. Algunas horas después, al levantarse, lo primero que notó Keith Richards, uno de los dos guitarristas de la banda, fue que la cinta de su grabador portátil se había acabado. Y que su guitarra reposaba sobre la cama en la que había dormido. Richards no recordó haber usado el grabador en ningún momento durante aquella noche, por lo que, preso de la curiosidad, se dispuso a escuchar lo que allí había. “Me desperté en medio de la noche”,declararía más tarde. “Cerca de mi cama había un grabador y mi guitarra acústica. A la mañana siguiente, cuando me desperté, vi que la cinta del cassette había seguido corriendo hasta terminarse. Entonces la rebobiné, y me encontré con algo así como 30 segundos de da-da da-da-da…Y también se puede escuchar el ruido de cuando dejo la púa sobre la mesa de luz. En cuanto al resto de la cinta, se trata de mí roncando”.

2Richards pudo no haber recordado el instante en que se despertó en medio de la noche con una melodía en su cabeza, ni mucho menos haber tomado su guitarra para luego apretar el botón de record y registrar un riff de nueve notas, antes de volver a dormirse, que iba a hacer historia. Pero las semillas de “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” ya estaban plantadas. Tras el descubrimiento, Richards salió a buscar a Mick Jagger, quien estaba retozando junto a la pileta del hotel y que instantáneamente se puso a escribir la letra para la canción de insatisfacción que su compañero de banda había plasmado unas horas antes, la misma que catapultaría a los Stones al megaestrellato definitivo. Y cuyo mensaje se consagraría como uno de los más simbólicos de esa década, acaso con perfecta vigencia hasta nuestros días.

foto1

Los renegados de Dartford (bueno, los Stones) junto a su manager Andrew Loog Oldham en los estudios RCA de Hollywood, 1965

Hasta ese entonces los Stones habían logrado meter solamente dos éxitos en el Top Ten de la mano de “Time Is On My Side” y “The Last Time” pero, en comparación con los logros obtenidos por otras bandas de la llamada British Invasion (claramente comandada por los Beatles), y con apenas un par de años de carrera, la banda necesitaba una canción que los lleve a la cima. Muy paradójicamente, a Richards ni se le había cruzado por la cabeza que aquella melodía sonámbula era exactamente lo que los Stones estaban necesitando. “Jamás pensé que fuera lo suficientemente comercial como para convertirse en single”, le confesó al autor Philip Norman para su libro “Sympathy For The Devil”. De hecho, como más tarde apuntaría Bill Wyman, el bajista original del grupo, Richards la consideraba“una canción más, de las tantas que podían servir de relleno en algún álbum”.
A lo largo de esa gira americana de 1965 los Stones acostumbraban a pasearse por diversos estudios de grabación para matricular sus ideas, por lo que el 10 de mayo, apenas tres días después de la inspirada noche de su guitarrista rítmico, anclaron en los legendarios estudios Chess de la ciudad de Chicago, los mismos donde parte de sus ídolos musicales favoritos (Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, etc.) registraron sus canciones más representativas. Allí, secundados por su manager y productor original Andrew Loog Oldham, los Stones lograron una primera versión de la canción, que incluía a Brian Jones (el por entonces segundo guitarrista del grupo, fallecido en 1969) en armónica, volviéndola a grabar dos días después en los estudios RCA de Hollywood, no sólo con un ritmo diferente, sino con una particularidad sonora que sería el sello emblema del sonido del cuerpo principal de “Satisfaction”, cuando Richards experimentó con agregarle a su guitarra el sonido de la Gibson Maestro Fuzzbox , la caja de efecto fuzz o “fuzz-tone”, que permitió aquel sonido característico que se asemejaba al de un saxo, y que también contó con la participación del músico y arreglador Jack Nitzsche en pandereta y piano. De hecho, una vez concluida la grabación, Richards, no conforme con el resultado obtenido, deslizó la posibilidad de grabar una tercera versión con una auténtica sección de vientos, pero fue vetada por el resto de los miembros del grupo y principalmente por David Hassinger, el ingeniero de sonido que estuvo en la sesión.

Bastante se ha rumoreado sobre lo que llevó a Richards a obtener la inspiración necesaria cuando se le ocurrió la melodía de la canción, teniendo en cuenta que la banda estaba influenciada por un amplio rango musical, pero el guitarrista nunca dejó de citar la música del combo femenino Martha And The Vandellas y su éxito del año anterior “Dancing In The Street” (de la cual resulta imposible disociar su clima con el de “Satisfaction”), o de “Nowhere To Run”, como así también de otros elementos sonoros de aquellos tiempos provenientes de la gloriosa compañía grabadora Motown Records. Y si la inconfundible propuesta melódica de la canción cimentaría para los Stones una carrera de más de medio siglo con muchísimas otras grandes composiciones, cuando hasta aquel momento sólo proponía un bacanal de buen ritmo, la trompada final llegaría de la mano de su atrevida letra, que si bien hoy día puede resultar poco controvertida para los tiempos que corren, en aquel momento no dudó en levantar más de una ceja.

4

Keith & Mick, manufacturando el single más emblemático de la carrera de los Stones

Desde su edición, en reiteradas ocasiones se sugirió que Jagger inconscientemente había tomado el estribillo de “Satisfaction” de “Thirty Days” de su amado Chuck Berry, cuando éste cantaba “If I don’t get no satisfaction from the judge / I’m gonna take it to the FBI and voice my grudge” (que debería ser interpretada como “Y si el juez no me ayuda/ Voy a ir a ver al FBI y expresar mi rencor”), clamando por la aparición de su chica. O de la mismísima “I Can’t Be Satisfied”del gran Muddy Waters. Nutriéndose de los avatares de la vida alocada de una banda de rock que estaba de gira y del impacto de la cultura americana que como extranjeros en tierras extrañas comenzaban a descubrir y experimentar día tras día, Jagger no trastabilló a la hora de referirse, y de forma explícita, al padecer la sobredosis de información (“Cuando estoy manejando mi coche/ Y aparece ese tipo en la radio/ Y me habla más y más/ De información inútil/ Que se supone es para encender mi imaginación”), o de publicidad desmedida (“Cuando estoy viendo la tele/ Y aparece ese hombre para decirme/ Lo blancas que pueden estar mis camisas/ Pero él no puede ser un hombre/ Porque no fuma los mismos cigarrillos que yo”), o las dificultades de tener sexo casual, yendo tan lejos como expresar que una de sus admiradoras se lo negó por una situación, eventualmente, muy habitual en la vida de una mujer (“Cuando estoy dando vueltas por el mundo/ Y hago esto, y firmo lo otro/ E intento transarme alguna chica/ Que me dice ‘Nene, mejor volvé la semana que viene porque, ya ves, estoy con el período’ ”)
1El escándalo que trajo aparejado la letra de “Satisfaction” pudo haberle venido de perillas al manager de la banda Andrew Loog Oldham (que desde el vamos se esmeró en publicitar a los Stones como los “anti-Beatles”, y con maravillosos resultados), pero la estrofa de una canción que aludía al rechazo de una mujer de una propuesta sexual por haberse encontrado menstruando -y que, adicionalmente, un enorme número de oyentes creyó se refería a la masturbación, o mínimamente, a la insatisfacción sexual- generó una colosal repercusión. Y siguiendo lo establecido por aquella máxima que dice que “la mala prensa es buena prensa”, el plan de Oldham, entonces, apenas tres meses después que los Beatles cantaran “me dijo que el vivir conmigo la deprimía”, se cumplió a rajatabla.
“(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” terminó editándose primeramente en los Estados Unidos un 6 de junio de 1965, con “The Under-Assistant West Coast Promotion Man” en la cara B (ambas canciones formarían parte del futuro álbum del grupo“Out Of Our Heads”, que saldría a la venta al mes siguiente). La versión británica del single de la canción, mientras tanto, se lanzaría algo más de dos meses más tarde, el 20 de agosto, y acompañada por “The Spider And The Fly”.

Jagger se referiría a “Satisfaction” como “la canción que realmente creó a los Rolling Stones, la que nos llevó de ser ‘un grupo más’ a una banda gigante. Tiene un título y un riff muy pegadizos. Y un gran sonido de guitarra, que fue muy original para esos días. Y captura el espíritu de aquellos tiempos, lo cual es muy importante en ese tipo de canciones: la alienación”.
Cuatro años más tarde del lanzamiento de “Satisfaction”, durante una conferencia de prensa de los Stones en New York en 1969, indagado sobre “si finalmente ya se sentía más satisfecho”, la primera respuesta de Jagger fue con una pregunta, que pueden escuchar y ver en el video que aquí debajo incluimos, a partir de los 3’15”: “¿Ud. dice financieramente, sexualmente o filosóficamente?”. A lo que la periodista replicó: “Satisfecho financieramente y filosóficamente…”. Jagger no titubeó al responder: “Financieramente, insatisfecho. Sexualmente, satisfecho. Filosóficamente, intentándolo”.

INTERVIEW: Andrew Loog Oldham. (Almost) Like a Rolling Stone

Standard

It’s no surprise at all arriving to Andrew Loog Oldham’s hotel room and find him on the phone. He’s lying in bed while he talks, and is sporting shorts and sandals. Being stuck to a phone must have been one of the most common tasks in his last fifty years, eventually since he began to be part of the British showbiz scene. After all, this is the man who, despite his informality, is the only one to hold the title of having been the Rolling Stones’ original manager and producer during the first four years of the band, mostly the essential ones. Which doesn’t sound bad at all, does it? And additionally one of the main iconic British record producers in both Pop and Rock history, let alone his role as impresario and, at least for the last 10 years or so, his own biographer, and incorrigible writer. Oldham is talking to his wife in Colombia, where he moved to about 30 years ago. Then one cannot help but wonder how come it is that, being Colombia a Spanish-speaking country, his isn’t as good as expected, and deliberately choosing to speak Spanglish instead, an informal way to describe the unofficial mix of both English and Spanish. “Well, I do eventually speak some Spanish, but anyway let’s do the interview in English” Sure Andrew, English then. And it’s going to be a long one. We’ll talk, discuss and argue for over two hours, and we’ll even lose track of what we were saying many times. In the meantime, there are at least half a dozen of flasks containing vitamin and herbal pills on one of the tables at Oldham’s hotel room (“I gotta take care of my liver, it’s something that comes from my grandfather”) There also different blends of British tea that he proudly got in Buenos Aires, and a large-sized plastic bag full of dry nuts, almonds and hazelnuts, which we’ll enjoy throughout the interview. Tea and sympathy from a true British man, how could you ever say ‘no’ to that? Next thing Andrew is complaining about the cost of the taxis in the city. I tell him not to worry, that they’re very much in keeping with any price at the supermarket. Oldham talks. A lot, almost non-stop. And so do I. We’ll interrupt each other quite often during the conversation. At 69, and with a brilliant memory, he is an unquestionable storyteller backed-up by an unlimited arsenal rich in personal experiences and juicy anecdotes which, after all, are the leitmotivs throughout his vast course, even when he’s now a bit in a hurry, too concerned about starting packing up all the things he bought during his stay in Buenos Aires (“It will take me a full day, I always buy things, I collect them”) He’s once again in town, this time to participate in a business conference for which he was hired by a local firm. But Oldham takes some advantage of it to spend a few more days in Buenos Aires, a city that, in his own words, “fascinates me”. I must confess, along the interview I had to stop myself from my original plan to ask him mostly questions exclusively related to his years with the Rolling Stones. That in the end were less than five, but truly the Stones’ embryonic ones. Oldham was there, almost right from minute one, nearly in every recording or photo session, TV appearance or concert of the band. Since the Stones were just another unknown underground act in London, to their virtual explosion into stardom, which he was an essential part of. But that wouldn’t happen, so far this time. He instead wanders around his endless labyrinth of stories, which is still a fantastic ride. But promises to do so in a future interview. So shall justice be done…

You were born in the 40’s but you’re considered a man of the 60’s, as eventually you started developing your career from the 60’s onwards. What was actually the very thing that took you to become interested in show business? I know you were always interested in the so-called “pop culture” in general. But was there anything else in particular?
When I was about 9 or 10, and I couldn’t go on the underground train, I couldn’t go by myself, I’d go with my mother. We lived in Hampstead, London. There was a part of me that was frightened of the underground because of the trains, the noise, the wind. The danger. But also because in the first year and a half of my life, even though I didn’t really realize it, every time the Germans came to bomb, you know we were always taken down into the underground when the sirens went. I don’t really remember it. Some people who are a little older than me remember it very well. As a distraction for me in that, the war experience…Have you ever been to London? And did you see the underground?

Yeah, last year, and I sure got on the underground many times.
OK, I think the underground is terrifying. You know, the tracks, the danger.

Well, I’d say, it’s so narrow. Maybe that’s the reason why they call it “the tube”
OK, you have a point, it’s true. I think you’re probably right, it could be that. OK I haven’t thought about that. It’s amazing how people arrive in the place that you were born and they locate the obvious. Anyway, I was attracted to film posters, because generally music wasn’t advertised. The film posters were in the underground, on the way down, so it was a distraction, it was a fascination, and I was immediately drawn to this wonderful escape, in particular the American films, and then on the second level I was attracted more to the words “produced by”, “presented”, “directed by”, because I already knew that I wouldn’t be John Wayne, that I would not be…

Joan Crawford…
That I wouldn’t be Joan Crawford! But Mick Jagger would…I knew I’m not gonna be James Cagney, or Tony Curtis. And also at that time, the Americans have gone home, and so in many ways they were perfect, because we only saw Americans as young people on the screen, where they had perfect dialogues, perfect lighting, and great exits. 3

Maybe you got the impression they were even more perfect because of the things you were going through at the time in England, as everything looked so gray and dark…And then those colour posters in the tube that eventually called your attention.
True! Exactly! You know England had won the war, but you wouldn’t know it, you wouldn’t notice it. The American money had gone to Germany.

I know your father died in the war. How old were you at the time?
I wasn’t born. I was conceived nine months before January of 1944, and he was killed in June of 1943.

So while your mother was pregnant with you, your father was away…
He was trying to bomb Germany! He was an American pilot. Interestingly he had a family home in America, and at the same time his wife was pregnant, in Texas. So I have a half-sister. I’ve never met her.

So your father wasn’t basically your mother’s husband…
No, it was one of those wonderful things, you know. His name was Andrew Loog. The second name was Loog. My mother’s last name was Oldham, but her mother had changed it from the original one, because they came from Poland and Lithuania.  So there were two women pregnant by the same man, and the one in Texas, Mrs. Loog… (The conversation is interrupted again by a phone that rings. First it was Andrew’s son Max, who lives in Brooklyn. Now it’s a friend who’s calling)

OK now?
Phones. Still better than cell phones. Cell phones are terrible. I don’t travel with a cell phone.

Welcome aboard! You know, I never had a cell phone. I hate them. I hate them too. So why you don’t like them? Is it because you’re reachable all the time?
I don’t live my life like that. I don’t wanna be reachable. I like the idea of coming into my hotel at 6 in the evening and say “were there any calls for me?”

One should remain in the past some way. You have the internet, this and that…
I want to, I want to! When I had lunch today, I was sitting there in a table all by myself. I just study people, and the amount of couples that spend lunch on the telephones! I don’t get it. If it’s good for them, fine. It’s not good for me.

Plus you can get robbed for it, you know. How is it in Colombia?
There’s a place where I go to hike, in Bogota. And there were always robberies in this mountain where people walk up. There were always gangs of young boys, they were probably 14 or 15. Once there was an old man carrying his cell phone, and one of them said to him “listen, you see this gun, it’s already killed seven people, eight won’t make any fuckin’ difference” People ask me “is Columbia still as dangerous as it was?” Probably, but so is the rest of the world. I mean, Manchester or Liverpool, they’re just dangerous. Because of drink, basically. And drugs.

So let’s go back to your mum…
So the wife of Liutenant Loog is also pregnant when his plane is shot down by the Germans and she, this woman in Texas, looks down at her pregnant stomach and she says (and this could only happen in Texas) “whether you’re a boy or a girl, you’re gonna be called Andrew Loog” So the real name of my half-sister is Andrew Loog! And I’m Andrew Loog Oldham! When I published Stoned I wanted to be polite and not necessarily say things that could hurt people, well, some people, and I got this sort of internet private detective that Stephen King uses…

Stephen King, the writer?
Yes, his friend was a friend of mine. So, the detective guy, he didn’t find her. This is in the year 2000. We’ve been to the Air Force records in Waco, Texas, and they said that I had three brothers. I don’t. I hired him to track her down, to find if I had any living family in Texas or Louisiana.
5

But you keep in touch with them, although you never visited or met them…
I found other relatives in England because of the publishing of the book, and this is amusing. When I was at the age of 10, that was the first time I was worried about losing my hair. I wanted to see a picture of my father, I just wanted to see what hair he had. My mother had a brother, and I said to her “do you have any pictures of him” “Only with his navy hat”, she said. “But what happened to him?” This is like 1955, I’m 10. She said “well you know, before the war we weren’t really friends, so when the war finished I didn’t see the point of finding out if he was alive or dead” That’s fuckin’ cold, fuckin’ incredible! She was very well-connected, and the American air force had written to her and told her that he had died. So alright, she has a brother or she doesn’t have a brother, either if he got killed in the war, or whatever. Now, cut to the year 2000, the book comes out and about ten months later the publisher, Random House, sends me a letter that arrives in Colombia, and it’s from Michael or something, all right, somebody “Oldham” in the West coast of England, where they made “Straw Dogs”, Sam Peckinpah’s movie. The letter says “we have no idea if our father’s sister is still alive, but we realized that you were part of the family, so we went and bought the book. We wanted to give it to our father, your uncle, for Father’s Day as a present, but unfortunately a week before he had a heart attack. He went into hospital and died!”

You should have never published that book then, maybe he would still be alive!
He might have died a week earlier…

The dark forces of universe…
All of that! All of that! See, my mother’s family went from Poland to Australia. Ironically their grandfather died in Sydney at the age of 42 of liver disease. When they got to England in 1920, it seems they were orphans, and they went to different foster homes. And they said that my mother resented the fact that his brother went to better homes. So she never spoke to him again. This story is so fuckin’ Agatha Christie! So that was that.

So no blood brothers…
No, thank God.

So this story has never been published before. Maybe you referred to it in your book but not with all the details…
If you look at all my books, they’re in there. Probably the stories about my uncle.

Your books are great and you have a very personal way of writing, I enjoyed reading the three first ones very much (Stoned2Stoned and Rolling Stoned) But what happened to Stone Free?
You know the way people think that all the eBooks and Kindle is the future, you know it’s not… 
4
I hate them!
I hate them too! But I’m afraid that’s the way it goes. People think that Mac and Apple are only 6 or 8 per cent of the business, but everybody in our business uses them, so we think the whole world uses them. They don’t. When I’m in Colombia, if a technician had to repair my Mac, they don’t know how to do it. Anyway, when the book came out as an eBook, I thought that was the future. I mean, I’m not going with an ordinary publisher, because an ordinary publisher is Harry Potter against everybody. So I gave it to this publisher, and my publicity man in England said to me “Andrew, if I don’t have a print, I can’t get reviews” So they printed them but, and here’s the disadvantage of being with an independent house. If they wanna send the book to England, they’re gonna pay the postage, and suddenly the book that was 20 dollars is suddenly 35 dollars. You cannot expect people to pay so much for a book. So I said to the publisher “OK listen, we tried, we all did our very best but is not working, so let’s finish the deal” Only a few were published, just enough for the reviews. They’re maybe available in independent bookstores in Los Angeles. Let me make us a cup of tea…

Sure, no problem.
You must stop using the words “no problem”

Why? Is it too American?
Yeah. It doesn’t mean anything. Just say “thank you” or, “not for me”!

You know last year I did my first trip to England ever, and I was a bit uncertain about my English, because it sounds rather American. I guess that’s because of the music, the movies, and all that. I mean, even British singers sound American when they sing…
When they sing, not when they speak. But the English, whether or not they have great voices, apart from, say, Joe Cocker, basically they’re acting.

All right now, have you heard the news that Monty Python is back again?
I’ve never liked Monty Python.

Sounds strange for an English person.
No, just a different generation. I like Lenny Bruce, Ernie Kovacs.

So, back to the beginning, now I know what made you become interested in show business. But your first important job was working for Mary Quant as her assistant. Actually her office boy. She put the miniskirt on the high street. The high street. This is very English, it’s strange. It’s the same with, uh, let’s see, if you go to public school, you’d think that would mean it’s for the public. It’s not, it’s for people who pay. Public schools are actually private schools. And it’s the same about high street. A wealthy area doesn’t usually have a high street, but a middle-class area does. One of the biggest stars of the 60s basically was the birth pill. So we did that and was mostly aimed at the working women. If you slept with somebody suddenly it didn’t necessarily mean that you had a baby, and you settled down, and your husband went to work. It was the beginning of both of you could work, right? So Mary did the mini-skirts and that was mostly aimed at the new young working woman. Actually, in music business we would say ‘copying’, but in fashion let’s say she was very influenced by the look of Coco Chanel. So it was basically the same. She never told me that, but if you look at them, they were very similar. Nothing is casual. So yeah, that was my first job.

So that wasn’t any original after all…
See, in England, before the Beatles, I wouldn’t say interesting, but we had a very uncreative life. Cliff Richard, Billy Fury, Marty Wilde, all those people. There was no chance at all that any of those people would have success in other countries. There were occasional freaks like Acker Bill, the Tornadoes with “Telstar”, and a couple of other things. But we copied American pop. But in a way that was unacceptable for America. Thy didn’t need Cliff Richard. They didn’t need Marty Wilde. Until the Beatles there was gonna be no America, simple as that. At the time we had Cliff Richard, Billy Fury, Marty Wilde and that British pop movement from ’58 to ’62. Basically, till the first Beatles’ single, fashion was the pop business. Between Mary Quant, Vidal Sassoon and John Stephen, the man who basically opened Carnaby Street, you know, with these shops and all that, that was the pop business, and it was also a British invention that was exported. You know Vidal Sassoon had a saloon in Hollywood, David Bailey took pictures that were in Vogue magazine…So England had an image in other countries but it wasn’t music.

So pop was directly related to fashion way before music…And by the way how would you define ‘pop’?
Exactly, it was. ‘Pop’ means volume, I mean, volume of sales. It’s like thinking of what’s the difference between a band and a group. You know, Herman’s Hermits were a group, they were never a band. By the way, I saw Peter Noone in Vancouver just a month ago. He was great. There are two versions. In England there’s the Hermits, without Peter Noone, and in America there’s Peter Noone with the Herman’s Hermits, but they’re not the Hermits.

But there was only one in the 60’s…
Yes they were the same people, but then Peter Noone went to America, and the band stayed in England. And they still play, but without Peter Noone.

So basically all the people from your generation – musicians, producers, the music industry  are alive and well…
Oh they are! I mean, rap and hip-hop, they have nothing to do with this, there’s no way. And people who are doing popular music now don’t write songs. One day in Vancouver I bumped into David Crosby on the street, and the first thing I thought was “Oh God I hope he hasn’t read my second book”, because there’s a lot of stuff in it about acid and him. I mean, somebody that old, if he’s an artist, they only have time for themselves. They’re being David Crosby, as it should be, 24 hours a day. In the conversation that we had he said “hey listen man, it’s really great, if you’re over 50, and you can stand up, and you can remember the words, there’s work for everybody”
6
So how about your next jump, from fashion to music. How did it happen?
I was never a fashion designer. I don’t know why, I just started doing publicity, and I did people like Little Richard and Sam Cooke. That was incredible, right? Then in the first couple of months of 1963, I was a press agent representing both the Beatles, and Bob Dylan.

And then you publicized Dylan on his first visit to England, I’d consider that a major step…
He was doing the background music for a BBC play. I found out where he was staying, and when I knocked on the door at the hotel, he was there with Albert Grossman, and whatever these two were talking about, I don’t remember what it was. But whatever it was I wanted that. I wanted this conspiracy, this marriage. This is intoxicating. I didn’t say to myself “oh I want to be a manager”, it wasn’t that simple. But whatever it was, I wanted it, I loved it. I wanted to be around this.

And I guess that must have been fun, and good times, and…
It’s only 20 minutes. That’s all it takes.

But Dylan was already big in England, wasn’t he? He was in the magazines, and in the news…
He wasn’t big at all. And he wasn’t big in America either. What happened was, this BBC director had gone on holiday to New York in the beginning of the winter of 1962. And he liked jazz and all that stuff, and he was down in the Greenwich Village, and one of the clubs he went to he saw Bob Dylan. In September or October of 1962 Dylan only had one record out. So this man went to his bosses and said “look we’re doing this play about beatniks” I think it was a Jack London thing, I’m not sure. “So can we bring him over?, it’s only one guy” And they brought him in. I probably got him in the Melody Maker and a couple of other newspapers. They gave me fifteen pounds. I couldn’t get very good publicity for it because nobody wanted to fuckin’ write about him.

So they weren’t interested in a guy singing his folk songs all alone with a guitar…
Only the Melody Maker, but the others ‘pop’ papers didn’t, because the Melody Maker was into jazz, folk, and stuff. So I did that in January, February and March, and then on April 28, that’s when I went to see the Rolling Stones. So basically in the first four months of 1963 I represented the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan. That was pretty good.

So you represented the three biggest acts at the same time…
Yes, but I didn’t think about it until five years ago. I had them all. I know why I realized it because I was thinking of it at somebody’s funeral. I had realized it before but I realized again at the end of last year because a guy called Chris Stamp died. He was the co-manager of The Who. And I was speaking at his funeral.

You gave a speech…
Well I wouldn’t say a speech, it’s meant to be with a little more humility. You’re supposed to be saying a few words in front of the people. And one of them was Roger Daltrey. Pete Townshend didn’t come because, as Roger said, “Peter’s probably trying to sell a few books” I knew what I was gonna say, but then I made it up. And I said “the great bands…”, and you cannot say this at a funeral, if you say this as a speech somebody’s gonna say “who the fuck does he think he is?”, right? Because it was a private audience. I said “the great bands have great managers” Brian Epstein, for instance, was the perfect manager.

You think so…
Oh yes! He used to be criticized, that he didn’t understand business. Fuck you! He was the perfect manager. So at the funeral I said “you know the Beatles, Brian Epstein was perfect. The Rolling Stones, I was perfect. And with the Who, Chris Stamp, who we are honouring today, and Kit Lambert, who died earlier, they were perfect for the Who. Just nobody else. You wanna talk to me about the Kinks?” And everybody started laughing, because they had terrible fuckin’ managers, they had a terrible fuckin’ record company.

Do you think that’s the reason why they haven’t gotten bigger than they actually were?
Yeah., I think you get what you deserve. The managers were amateurs. One of them was a real estate guy. The other, Robert Wace, I don’t know what he did then, but how he got the job with the Kinks is, he was one of the upper class people. He hired this band (they had a different name then, the Ravens) to play while he sang to all of these girls of the same class at a party. And he was singing Gerry and the Pacemakers songs, and they were backing him and he kinda looked around and went “they’re quite good, I’ll manage them” Anyway bands with two brothers are always fuckin’ trouble. Always. Don and Phil, the Everly Brothers, up to Oasis.

I guess you heard about this rumour that said the Kinks could get together again… T
That’s never gonna happen. Ray Davies says that every time he’s doing a solo tour because he thinks he might sell a few more tickets.

At the time you started working with the Stones they were informally represented by Giorgio Gomelsky, but then you took over with Eric Easton and Impact Sound. So how did that happen?
See, there was a journalist called Peter Jones who worked for the Record Mirror, he said to me “you know, there’s this group, we’re going to write about them, and this young writer who works for us, his name is Norman Jopling, he thinks they’re very good and blah blah blah. Maybe you should go and see them, Andrew” Actually I was quite happy doing publicity, and I had to go see them on a Sunday. They were playing this club, the Station Hotel, in a room at the back of the Station Hotel, in Richmond. Giorgio Gomelsky hired the room and presented this “Rhythm and Blues Night” So I thought, “I don’t really wanna go” because, living in Hampstead I thought that I would have to get the tube train into the middle of London, and then out again to Richmond. And that on a Sunday was going to take two fuckin’ hours. And Sundays, I used to spend them with my mother. She cooked, she ironed my shirts. I mean, a Sunday home. And we all sat at 8 o’clock and we watched  the equivalent of the Ed Sullivan Show, which was Sunday Night at the London Palladium. But then my girlfriend at the time, who later became my first wife, said “Andrew, you know, there are trains that go overground, instead of underground, and they go from Hampstead, Finchley Road” So I could go straight. In a way I was disappointed, I actually didn’t want to go but the I thought, if I don’t go, when I go see Peter Jones on Tuesday, that wouldn’t be any good, as I was trying to sell him stories. At the time I didn’t care about Rhythm and Blues, I really wasn’t really interested, you know, and I had never heard about the Rolling Stones. So I went. I get off the train in Richmond and then, to get to the back of the Station Hotel, I don’t think you could go into the hotel and walk to the back. You had to get to the back, and there was an alley, and I’m walking down the alley, and there’s this couple having a fight, or an argument. And they were very attractive. And they looked like each other, which makes it more attractive. And I go in, and when the Rolling Stones come onstage I realized that the boy in that couple was Mick Jagger, and he was with Chrissie Shrimpton. Years later I realized that it was one the longest fuckin’ walks in my life, from the Richmond station over to the back door. Ten years ago, I went there, and it’s only from here to there!
11
So how did you talk Dick Rowe into signing the Stones?
Simple, because he turned down the Beatles, he said no to them. Decca then would have signed anything. They would have signed Davy Crockett, or a ventriloquist dummy. 

It’s well-known you started encouraging Mick and Keith to write songs, that’s a fact. But what about the kitchen story? True or not? Nobody better than you to confirm or deny it…
Well that story is true, but it’s like when the accordion is in, that’s the story. But when you open up the accordion, the real story is that it took more than a few days. And the reality is that I said to them “for all the different reasons you have to write. I’m gonna take my laundry to my mother’s and when I come back, you’ve gotta have started something” That was in their place at 33 Mapesbury Road. And they did. They thought it was a joke. I think it’s Keith that said something like “what’s he’s talking about?” My attitude was “you play the guitar, therefore you can write a song” You know, “you’ve got all the ammunition”

At the same time you discovered Marianne Faithfull. That’s when she recorded “As Tears Go By”. What about that famous anecdote, when you described her as “an angel with big tits”?
I’ve never said that. Never. I don’t speak about anybody like that. Philip Norman put it in his book, but I don’t know where he got it from. I did not say it. I would never speak like that about somebody who I represented. Image

What about artists in general?
90 per cent of the time they’re selling something, and only 10 per cent is doing the work. For example, and this has nothing to do with his book, but over the years, save for the last 20 years, I would read Keith Richards interviews and I’d say to myself “hasn’t he got anything else to say? He keeps repeating the same fuckin’ stuff” It’s like a fuckin’ monkey on a wheel, right? Then, when I had to promote Charlie is My Darling in America two years ago, I didn’t fuckin’ believe it. I mean, I hadn’t done any promotion in America particularly, not intensely like we were promoting Charlie is My Darling. I had to go to two interviews, one at MTV and one at CBS. I had to go through this thing where, somebody rehearsing for the interview wanted to know what my answers would be. Before I was on TV, or before the interview! So it goes like this, they ask me a question like “when you first saw the Rolling Stones?” “Well” (he gets sarcastic), “this wonderful wave came over me, I just knew suddenly what my destiny was…” (laughs) The producer, or the interviewer, or the assistant, wanting to know what my answers are gonna be to their questions!

Was it also like that in the 60’s?
Oh no, this is now. Now we are in the era of…How many times did you see people being interviewed on TV go “now that’s an interesting question!” Then when you go live on TV, and they know what your answers would be because of that policy, there’s nothing for you to answer! They (the interviewers) wanna be the stars. They wanna be the celebrities and they wanna have all the information. When Keith does the interviews, in this new generation of doing interviews, all that exists in the end is the sound byte. And it gets worse. There’s a woman producer there, and then it’s as I’m not there! She says “ask him some more dangerous questions, you haven’t said anything good yet” And the result is Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus. Justin Bieber, it’s great. Miley Cyrus is great. The other one, Taylor Swift, she used to be great. Then she fuckin’ turned into Bette Davis.

9
What about records today?
To me it’s very difficult these days to make a record that has any sex in it, that turns corners in a human way in a world that is pure technology. Technology has a condom on it. It doesn’t matter if you make the records now with tape, it’s still gonna be destroyed by the technology.

And it’s the same with today’s artists?
Well, I don’t like Miley Cyrus smoking marijuana in public. We took drugs incrementally. We started out with pot, then we went to speed, then we went to this or that, and we looked at the medical books to know what we were doing. I don’t do drugs now, but I used to think that marijuana was OK for people who aren’t addicts or alcoholics, but it’s not the marijuana we know from the 60’s. It’s a chemical. And that’s different. Food is also full of chemicals. Bread is not bread. Or chicken. Or fish.

Keith Richards says he got into heroin because he felt he was too shy to face fame. I never thought of him as a womanizer or a real hellraiser.
Yes, I believe it. It’s the same when Paul McCartney talks about John Lennon and says “Brian Epstein liked me too” I mean, who cares? Keith likes having the reputation as a womanizer. I don’t remember that. He may have been it. If he was, he was very quiet about it. My first wife fixed him up with his first girlfriend, Linda Keith, because he had to go out with somebody! And Linda was going out with Jimi Hendrix at the same time! She just wanted to improve her status of Keith’s woman at the time. She was a clever woman. And when she took me to see Jimi Hendrix in New York (he was working for James Brown and they already did a great version of ‘Satisfaction’), after she asked me to take her out for dinner, we went to see him and Hendrix was so fuckin’ stoned. Either he didn’t play that night, or he did play and I was too confused. She was sleeping with Keith, and I was managing Keith at the time, and so I asked myself what the fuck I was doing there. If Jimi Hendrix played, I didn’t pay attention. So afterwards I go back to the hotel, it was like 2 o’clock in the morning, and there was a message from my wife in England that read “Linda called me and said that you had asked her out, what are you doing taking Linda Keith out?” Women in music, you know. If you look at the process of writing, it’s basically two guys that live together, and they write great songs. Whether it’s in a room, backstage, in a van. Most of their lives, they can’t afford girlfriends. Then they get girlfriends and they go to separate apartments. It doesn’t matter if it’s John Lennon and Paul McCartney, it doesn’t matter if it’s Mick and Keith, or Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane. Then they make appointments to get it right with each other, and hopefully with their fuckin’ girlfriends out.

And that’s no good for a band. Like the Brian, Anita and Keith thing, right?
When Allen Klein started being the business manager, we were doing a tour, and I never wanted their girls on the road. Never wanted them in the studio, or on the road. He flew them in. There’s distraction because a man would behave differently in front of his woman, it’s obvious, as simple as that. Allen Klein flew them in. So that’s how it goes with bands and girlfriends. Then the next thing that happens, they get famous, and they’re busy, and what happens is one of them pretty much writes a whole song, and takes it to the other one, and maybe the other one says “you could do the bridge better” or “how about this to end it?” Then eventually there’s no contribution. One writes a song, and it’s pretty much finished. Steve Marriott of the Small Faces once said to me “Ronnie doesn’t fuckin’ do anything”, or the other way round. I said “does he still tell you when the song is ready? When it’s finished? When to stop? If he does then he’s still worth 50 per cent!”

8Was it also like that with Humble Pie after the Small Faces?
It was different, and very strange. Steve Marriott demanded that you loved him and him only.

Back to the Stones, do you get on with them nowadays, are you in contact with any of them?
I vaguely stay in touch with Keith through his manager. He sends me faxes. I once was with him at this Rock and Roll Hall of fame thing in a place in New York in the 80’s and I saw Billy Joel was there too. So I told Keith “see, there’s Billy Joel, I’d really want to talk to him” And Keith says “what do you wanna talk to him for?” I said “he writes by himself, I wanna ask him how he does it” So we go over and Billy Joel doesn’t understand what the fuck I’m talking about. “How do you do it, Billy? How do you know when to stop? How do you know which wall to bounce off of? What is your feedback if there isn’t someone else with you?” Well because he does it, my questions weren’t making sense to him. And Keith says “Andrew, he doesn’t fuckin’ understand what you’re talking about, let’s fuckin’ leave him alone” I mean, my questions weren’t logical to Billy Joel because he had never dealt with I was talking about, which was about two people writing.

A case for that would be the Elton John-Bernie Taupin songwriting team…
I wish he had stopped! (laughs) It was so fuckin’ boring! I mean, the last four records I listened to, I listen to all of Paul McCartney, all of David Bowie, I listened to two of Elton John, and I listen to all of Carlos Vives. I would never play those records again. I played them once, their new records. Bowie’s single was like a very attractive shop window, and then when you go into this shop, the shop’s empty. And Paul McCartney, onstage and in life he’s the greatest fuckin’ entertainer, and he’s incredible. In the last two years, and in a very polite way, he killed John Lennon. Fine. He finally did. John Lennon in death cannot compete with the life force of Paul McCartney. When Paul McCartney’s new album came out, most people went “it’s fuckin’ terrible!” Then I don’t know what happened. A couple of people who write in America who are regarded as important, like Bob Leftsez, they would change their mind, they suddenly went “oh it’s a great record!” So I get to my place in the jungle, and play it, and I say “he’s got to be kidding!” Four producers and all. I’m not criticizing him. I understand that him, or Elton John, have to go into the studio and make a record. Because when we were 20 or 25, there was a passion. Now, they’re 70, and it’s a disease, basically. So the problem is, when these people make records, they may feel young making them, but when we listen them we feel old. It makes me feel fuckin’ old, I don’t wanna listen to it. Now his show is fuckin’ great, but we don’t need the record. Ironically, there was a record about five years ago, Neil Diamond recorded with Rick Rubin. I thought “oh this should be good”, I bought it. Now he didn’t do with Neil Diamond what he did with Johnny Cash but then again Johnny Cash was dying, so it’s different. Makes the relationship and the result different. But what happens after you listen to it, you don’t remember any of the songs that are on the record, but you start remembering the old Neil Diamond songs. And it’s the same with Paul McCartney’s “New” album. When I was listening to it, the next two days I started to sing Wings songs. And it’s the same with Brian Wilson’s Gershwin record. There’s only one track that sounds like “Pet Sounds”, and that was in the commercial. The rest is fuckin’ crap. It sounds like Alvin and the Chipmunks, it’s terrible. Old people make old music, that’s it.

And how was it when you formed Inmediate Records?
Very simple. I liked the idea of an independent record company, I was copying Phil Spector, Red Bird, Leiber & Stoller, Liberty Records, Specialty Records, but also I was getting stoned. And I didn’t want to go on with Decca anymore. Because everything they said, as I was stoned, I thought it was funny. So I formed my own record company.

Well it didn’t work bad…
It worked great, as long as I had the money to pay for it.

12
Your last book, Stone Free, was dedicated to Brian Epstein.
Sure, it’s a book about managers. Because he was the first. Very often I’m into situations like ”you have in your mind Brian Epstein was not a good manager?” If Brian Epstein hadn’t persevered and got his boys a recording contract, we wouldn’t be here now. Simple as that, he opened the door. Because, look at the insults they were throwing at him in the beginning. There were two things going against him that were very bad in England in 1961 or 1962. That he was Jewish and that he was Gay. Tough, very tough. Both were nearly against the law! (laughs)

The only insult left would have been that he was black…
Right, very good.  Paul McCartney did too. He was on this TV program once, and his father had told him Jews were clever people so he should sign with Brian. But the point is, after Decca, he got them EMI . Let’s remember that one of the reasons was because his family record shop sold a lot of records a week. But they still fuckin’ insulted him by putting him on Parlophone, because Parlophone was a comedy label. George Martin was a comedy producer. He produced the people that were the Monty Pythons of the 50’s and 60’s. The Goons, with Peter Sellers and Spike Milligan. He produced a British comedian called Charlie Drake, who covered “Splish Splash” and had a hit with it. He produced the no. 1 record of 1959, which was Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren with “Goodness Gracious Me” So fuckin’ silly. It was an accident hat George Martin could turn out to be the perfect person for them. I tell you, George Martin didn’t go to the first two sessions. His assistant did “Love Me Do” and “Please, Please Me”, and during “Please, Please Me” the assistant picked up the telephone, called George Martin and said “George I think you should come down here, they’re good” So the consolation prize for the assistant is that they made him and A&R man. His name was Ron Richards, and he went on to produce the Hollies. Look at what happened in America. Capitol Records, which was EMI, didn’t want to release the Beatles. And so, without Brian Epstein haven’t kept going, I wouldn’t be here now, I wouldn’t be on the radio for twenty hours a week, and that’s life.
10
This isn’t your first visit to Argentina. The first time was in the early 90’s when you were hired to produce the Ratones Paranoicos, and then you mixed an album by Charly García.

I was not up too much as regards work in the early 90’s. I had tried to work with a couple of Colombian acts, but for various reasons the results were not satisfactory. Well, to start with, I perhaps should not have been attempting to work with acts whose inspiration was based in the 80’s….Soft Cell, The Human League. I mean , I liked some, actually a lot of records from that time, but I probably had no business trying to produce it. I was not that kind of producer. Interestingly I was in a taxi yesterday here in B.A. and Hall & Oates’ “Out of Touch” came on the radio. I just loved that record at the time and yesterday I realized one of the reasons why. There are at least two or three Motown songs stitched and threaded into the Hall & Oates’ song. “It’s the Same Old Song” by The Four Tops is just one. Anyway so I am in Los Angeles in the early 90’s, hanging in Malibu where my wife Esther, our son Max and I found our first dog which was headed for the dog pound until we stuck her in a hatbox with half a valium and shipped her back to Colombia where she stayed with us for nearly a dozen years. First dog in our tribe. Then I got a message in Malibu, a guy called Cachorro López was trying to get hold of me. We spoke, he was calling on behalf of the Ratones; they wanted me to produce their first recording for Sony. So I came down to Buenos Aires for the first time. It was love at first sight. With the Ratones Paranoicos, with Buenos Aires, with the spirit of Argentina. The Ratones and Argentina gave me life, and I gave them hits. It was a good exchange. Their music was much more natural to me than the stuff of the 80’s and we made some great music together. The Rolling Stones, Humble Pie and the Ratones Paranoicos, the top three musical experiences with bands in my life.

I heard you’ve just been inducted for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this year. I believe that’s nothing but great news, isn’t it?
It certainly is news, unexpected. Of course it is an honor to be inducted with Brian Epstein, for all the obvious reasons, as in when he unlocked the door for his lads, the Beatles, we all became his lads in some strange way. On the other hand I feel as if someone else is being inducted, perhaps a different but parallel version of how Yusuf Islam feels about Cat Stevens getting the same nod. I made my home in Latin America in 1975, I have nothing really to do with England. I was watching the queen’s 50th celebrations a while ago, filmed at Buckingham Palace in 2002. Amazing how just a dozen years later it all looked so felliniesque and grotesque. I was brought up to think that the honor was in the work accomplished, what I accomplished, what I suppose I am being acknowledged for not before almost feels like it happened in another life.

Last question. You’ve always used this very special kind of twisted and kind of mixed-up language in the liner notes of the Stones’ albums, or in your books. Was it done somehow on purpose?
See, when I write a book is like making a record. First I have to entertain myself.

Image