2 HOURS -AND MORE- WITH ANITA PALLENBERG

Standard
“Aren’t you staying for lunch?” How could one ever say ‘no’ to that when it’s Anita Pallenberg who’s asking it? It all happened last year during the days of the fourth and (so far) last visit of the Stones to Buenos Aires as part of the Latin American Olé Tour, which had started a few days earlier in Santiago de Chile, and with 10 more shows to go after the three in Argentina, closing on a high note in Havana, Cuba. This time, in order to avoid fans leaning out at the hotel doors, or even camping out, looking to catch a glimpse of the band, the Stones’ machine had come up with a new strategy, which was splitting them into different locations. Then Jagger stayed at the Palacio Duhau Park Hyatt, and Ronnie Wood at the Faena Hotel, while the Four Seasons (where the whole band was in all previous visits, taking over the luxurious Álzaga Unzué mansion, at the back of the hotel) was the headquarters of both Charlie Watts and Keith Richards.
 

As it’s been happening for at least the last 25 years (eventually, as the Stones’ kids grew older), taking them on tour became a usual thing. Children, wives, and even parents (during the band’s first time in the country in 1995, Keith had even brought dad Bert with him) ended up joining the party as they wandered around the world. But never ex-love partners. So I felt already too skeptical when an English girl friend that had come to South America to see some of the shows (and who was also staying at the Four Seasons) told me she had seen Anita Pallenberg in the afternoon taking a swim at the hotel’s pool. I denied her statement right from start. Anita hadn’t been close to the band for 35 years or more, at least since she stopped being Keith’s love-mate, and even when they were together, she was never one to show up on tours much often. “Anita? No way! You must have seen somebody that looked like her” Less likely to happen in South America, I thought to myself. I then asked her if she somehow had a chance to talk to the woman. “No, I didn’t”, she admitted, “but I sure can tell it was Anita. She was swimming next to me, she had a leopard bathing suit…” I could have kept refusing it on and on, I was sure she was clearly mistaken. At the end of the day, I thought again, everybody sees everybody’s look-alikes all the time. In fact the last time Anita had visited far away South America was around Christmas in 1968, when along Keith Richards,Marianne Faithfull and (Marianne’s then) boyfriend Mick Jagger took a boat all the way to Brazil, spending their holidays in the city of Matão (countryside of the São Paulo state, where Keith got the inspiration to write “Honky Tonk Women”), and then moving to Rio and Bahia, before heading for a few days in Perú. At the time, Anita had already become Keith’s steady girlfriend after he rescued her from the arms of his fellow bandmate Brian Jones (her original lover, with whom she shared an idyllic relationship before Jones, paranoid and currently dealing with one too many addictions, became violent with her) My friend’s theory about Anita’s sight in Buenos Aires 48 years later was, to say the least, unthinkable. However, as I was pacing the hotel lobby next day to meet another friend, who was also staying at the Four Seasons, I happened to see a woman walking by away enough from me who looked a lot like Anita (eventually, Anita in those days, whose older image I was familiar with after I had seen some new pictures of her on the internet a few months earlier) The woman rushed out of one of the elevators, going somewhere else. It all didn’t last for more than a millisecond, and wondering if I hadn’t actually imagined it (or, worst case scenario, if it wasn’t somebody resembling me of her), I decided to move on.

PERFORMANCE AP MIRROR RS 11 copia

Photo: Michael Cooper

But it all became true the day of the second show of the Stones in La Plata. A while before the concert began, as I was having a drink at the VIP area, once again I saw the lady I briefly spotted at the hotel the previous day, who now was about five meters from me, walking towards one of the tables. I was still quite dubious, I won’t deny it. More over, nobody attending the VIP seemed to notice that singular woman, elegantly dressed, with a hat, and walking with a cane. The possible fact it was actually her, going unnoticed by the others, no matter what, was also likely to happen. Only that she wasn’t on her own. Besides her was my friendAdam Cooper, which led me to start wondering if somehow I could have been wrong from the beginning. To anybody not familiar with his name, Adam is the son of Michael Cooper, the legendary photographer mostly famous for being the one who shot many of the English rock and pop stars in his home country during the ‘60s and ‘70s and, and even more important, for being the one who did the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Their Satanic Majesties Request covers. That’s right, those two album covers.

vip stones La Plata

Anita and me at the VIP in La Plata

Adam has been living in Buenos Aires for at least 20 years (where he organized many photo exhibitions showing his father’s works, as he also did abroad) and whom I’d first met shortly after his original arrival to Argentina. But long before that, when he was still the little boy living with his father in Chelsea, London, in the mid-‘60s, with his mum mostly out of the whole picture, and because of dad Michael’s friendship with the Stones, he had found a sort of surrogate mothers in both Marianne Faithfull and Anita Pallenberg. Not just one, but two, as if that weren’t enough. Marianne and Anita cuddled him, invited little Adam home to play, making him part of a memorable and amazing  cultural scene he would only become aware of as he got older. Plus the fact I knew Adam used to get in touch with them quite often after all these years, no matter the distance. This time there was no doubt that the woman my friend had seen by the hotel’s pool, or the one I’d seen at the lobby, was the same one. And that was Anita Pallenberg. I ended up swallowing my words, as I watched her chatting with Adam in the midst of the cacophonous rumble at the VIP area before the Stones’ second show in La Plata, while I slowly approached them. I greeted Adam and then introduced myself to Anita, telling her about my joy to see her visiting the country, and finally asked her to have a picture with her. Something against my own ethics, by the way. For some reason I never ever felt comfortable asking for a picture, period. Not only because I never found it right to invade anybody’s area, but actually mostly because a photograph without a story behind is nothing but that, an image born by ways of a lens and a button that’s pushed down, lacking naturalness, and turning out into a forced, artificial kind of situation. Without a before, without a during, and also lacking an after. Add to that I didn’t like the idea Anita could think I was just another fan looking for a picture to display on Facebook. Anita had always been one of my favorite female icons (that is, besides my devotion to the lives and times of the Stones, of which she played, needless to say, a major role in) So then Anita, the lady, gently said ‘yes’, displaying her trademark smile. It didn’t last for longer than 2 minutes, I’d say even less than that, and so I decided to leave them alone for better. I actually wouldn’t  have been interested in taking any pictures had I had the chance to talk to her instead, as talking always comes first. Out of there, away from the noise, and in the right place. I’d later apologize to my British friend for my stubborn reluctance to her story.

ANITA KONEX

Anita at the Michael Cooper’s 
exhibition at the Konex
(Photo: Adam Cooper)

Two days later, on Friday February 12, the weather was already awfully soaking wet by the time it dawned. The hottest February ever in history, according to the local meteorologists. There was still one final Stones’ show at La Plata’s Estadio Único next day but, once again, and despite the unbearable temperature, I had to go back to the Four Seasons to meet a fellow friend from New Zealand who was also in Buenos Aires for the Stones concerts. We had agreed to meet in the early afternoon but, given the weather conditions, I decided to leave from home earlier, which led me to arrive to the hotel before I expected. It was only a few minutes after my arriving to the Four Seasons that there I came across Adam again who, polite as usual, approached me to say hello. I asked him why he was there, and he replied he had an appointment with Anita, they were going to have lunch together at one of the hotel restaurants. I didn’t hesitate for a second, and next thing I was telling him how important it would be for me to finally have the chance to exchange a few words with her (more than a minute and a half, at least) now that we were in the right place to do so, away enough from the concert craziness.“Sure”, he said, “right now she must be coming down in the elevator” I confessed to him all I actually wanted (and whoever is reading this, please believe my very words) was just to walk them up to the restaurant table, and then I was done. As I said before, I’m not the kind of person who likes to interfere with anything, let alone something I wasn’t invited to in the first place. Anita showed up in a matter of seconds, elegantly dressed, bohemian style, in a leopard pattern printed dress and purse, flashing her classic smile. After greeting us gracefully, we started heading to the Nuestro Secreto restaurant, which can be accessed right from the very entrance of the mansion. Once again, I knew time would be never enough to have a proper chat, so far for me, but nevertheless I was happy enough to be with them and have a word in the meantime. Plus there was no way Anita could have remembered about our brief meeting at the stadium. We reached the restaurant five minutes later and, as promised, I said goodbye to them. That’s just when she unexpectedly invited me to have launch with her and Adam. “Aren’t you staying for lunch?” In the right place now. And in case it all happened because she felt sorry letting me go, she gave me another of those killer smiles confirming that she really meant she was inviting me to join them. “Oh, I’d love to stay!” “Sure, have a seat”, she confirmed, which I instantly agreed to while getting ready to be part of an unforgettable one-of-a-kind moment. I can’t actually remember now what we ordered to eat (quite weird for somebody as insanely thoughtful as me), but the three of us sure drank mineral water. Some details may always escape my mind. That’s the price one pays when you put much attention to a woman with an overwhelming personality like Anita had to say, someone who lived and survived (nearly) anything, when other personal issues take second place and you prioritize her knowledgeability above all, addressing literally any topic, which she proved to know quite much of.

Gerard-Malanga-Andy-Warhol-Edie-Sedgwick-Chuck-Wein-Anita-Pallenberg-guest

Gerard Malanga, Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Chuck Wein, Anita, and a guest. Warhol’s Factory times.

Readers may wonder why I didn’t ask her about all those facts and stories we read again and again over the years. But what was there to ask? And what would have been the outcome anyway? The answer is, they’re all pretty well-known, then why asking about them again? After all, this was no interview, this wasn’t me the journalist meeting her. No journalistic duties involved this time then, but just an informal and regular conversation. It was lovely and extremely funny  to enjoy Anita’s great sense of humor throughout the two hours or more we’d been there.  I just let it flow. Had it not been so, I would have sure asked her about the days when she was expelled from a German boarding school at 16, or her times at Andy Warhol’s Factory after she arrived to New York. Long before her entry into the world of the Rolling Stones, Anita was already a class A rebel with enough skills (out of her amazing physical beauty, she managed five languages) that she made best use of. That’s one of the reasons why listening to all she had to say was such an amazing experience. And although it was mostly English we talked (in Anita’s case, with a strong Italian accent), she would often come up with a few single words in a different language. She told us how much she loved the hot weather above all, and that she was always running away from the cold. That’s why, she explained, she shared her time in at least four different destinations in the world, mostly in Keith Richards’ house in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, “where the weather was always nice”, or in other places that also belonged to Keith , like the Redlands country house in West Wittering (located in West Sussex, England, yes, which was scene of the famous February 1967 police raid) or the one in Cheyne Walk, right by London’s Chelsea Embankment (where she started living with Keith in 1969), or even her native city of Rome where, as much as I remember, she told me she used to have, or still had a sister living there.

PERFORMANCE MJ & AP PERFORMANCE RS 4

Anita and Mick Jagger during the shooting of “Performance” (1968)

Clouds of artificial smoke coming out of her electronic cigarette, extremely tanned and with her skin slightly wrinkled, the then 73-year-old Anita still carried the sex appeal that had been a permanent trademark all though her life. And whereas she no longer had that fresh beauty so typical of her when she was younger, her particular way of speaking, coupled with an established femininity, still made her a very attractive woman. And that halo all around her! There’s something rather strange that always happened to me whenever I had the chance to meet somebody I admired, or wished I’d ever meet in person, being it for an interview or, such as in this opportunity, that of a fortuitous encounter, and that’s in a way or another, I always feel that person isn’t actually there in front of me, in spite getting this endless collage of images and intermingled stories that remain away from what is really happening at the very moment you’re talking to them. It mostly felt like it every time I had the chance to meet somebody with a heavy history behind, that I really admired, or meant a lot to me. That’s when I’m not able to separate all that from the true reality, as redundant as that may sound. It’s like one dimension within another, while both get constantly blurred on the fly. For that reason, meeting Anita had little to do with the actual fact of being there with her, instead making me feel I was watching an unlimited short film where the thousands of images of her I saw over the years, being them photographs or footage, came one after another non-stop, taking me to a parallel dimension. Which is a probably the same that could happen to anybody into the lives and times of the Rolling Stones, as it’s undeniable that Anita Pallenberg epitomizes a crucial element in the band’s history. Because, to put it this way, if there’s no certain amount of danger involved, there’s no rock and roll at all. And I’ve always believed Brian and Anita were the first ones to come up with that pinch of danger in the Stones, something which they’d go along with in their formative years and beyond. Brian gave the Stones their original style and attitude, anticipating which would come later, while Anita with her piercing gaze and dangerousbad girl aura was just the icing on the cake, an irresistible dish on the table.

keith-richards-anita-pallenberg-1024x694

Brian Jones, Anita and Keith in Tangiers, Morocco, 1967

That’s the main reason why, all through the lunch, I wasn’t essentially able to take my eyes off her, while another shot of a thousand images crossed my mind, and all that now taking place only a few inches from me. All those pictures of she and Keith, Anita seducing Mick while shooting Performance (which led to the very first rift between the Glimmer Twins), Anita “the Great Tyrant” who controls the underground city where Jane Fonda landed in Roger Vadim‘s science fiction film Barbarella, or another of her film roles, in A Degree of Murder, which original movie soundtrack by ex boyfriend Brian Jones remains unreleased to this day. Instead, I chose to look and listen to her, while (once again) that endless number of images kept going through my head with Anita in the leading role, the Stones’ muse par excellence, and no way it could stop. The full blooded “it girl” during much of the ‘60s and ‘70s, who after all this time couldn’t help but give you a crushing smile, that very one an English magazine once referred to as “that witchy smile”, the kind of girl everybody wanted to have.

barbarella

On the set of “Barbarella” (1968)

It’s noon and it’s summer and in this restaurant in a fancy hotel in Buenos Aires here’s the woman whose veins have seen vast doses of opiates go by, when being a junkie had to do only with one’s own decisions, and not because of a snobbish pose to satisfy a photographer’s eye. The one who was part of the whole thing behind “Sympathy for the Devil” during a pivotal year, when many people started considering Anita “the sixth Stone”. “Is it true that all those ​​’oohs, ooh, oohs’ in the song was your idea?” I’d rather refrain from asking her. She may not be interested in setting the record straight, or in reviewing other pages of her past, which she makes clear when, after my suggesting she should write her autobiography some day, she honestly replies “I can’t remember anything”. It was a short way of explaining the true story behind her answer, her actual reluctance to do so as, since “all that the publishers want are the stories with some scandal involved” Neither it was needed to discuss her contribution to the Stones’ mystique. It was enough of her to express her unconditional love for the band’s history, of which now wonders about its fans, “Don’t they realize they’re already grown-ups and that they need to have some rest after a show?” Now it’s Anita who’s shooting questions. “Sure”, I said, “but I guess there’s nothing we can do about it” And then she smiles back, followed by another puff from her electronic cigarette. Later on she would refer to the Toronto 1977 days, when she and Richards got arrested at the airport after customs searched their luggage and found out they were carrying drugs. Well, you all know the story. Richards would get his visa back after a while, which allowed him entrance to the USA, while Anita had to wait for many years. “That was the worst time of my life”, she would confess, as we ordered more mineral water. Interestingly, she proposed talking about the current political scene in Argentina at the time, when we tried to explain to her that our previous government had restricted the local population to get any foreign currency for many years, a subject she suddenly changed to express her love for her children and grandchildren. Adam had invited Anita to visit Early Stones, by Michael Cooper, the photo exhibition featuring his father’s works which was currently taking place at Ciudad Cultural Konex that very afternoon once we finished our lunch. With just one last Stones show in Buenos Aires to go, and with no intentions to follow the rest of the Latin American tour (“I’m not following it, after Buenos Aires I’m going back to Jamaica”) we finally left the restaurant and headed for the exhibition, where Adam was honoring his father once again displaying pictures from the Stones’ early years, which Anita had been an essential part of.

Anita y Silvia Cooper, esposda de Adam, en la muestra en el Konex

Another picture of Anita at the Konex, with Silvia Cooper, Adam’s wife (Photo: Adam Cooper)

Before jumping on the elevator that would take us back to the ground floor of the hotel, I considered having a picture with her: “Anita, I hate to say this, but I’d love a picture of the day I met you” “Oh no, sorry, I’m not wearing any make-up”, she reacted, flashing another of her classic smiles. That’s when I realized that, after all, and against any logic, at least this time a thousand words would be worth an image. To my surprise, there came an unexpected bonus. By the time we got to the main entrance of the Four Seasons, amidst some 35-odd degrees, Adam asked us to wait for him outside as there was something else he needed to do, which turned into about 10 minutes of me and Anita all alone sitting on one of the benches right by one of the hotel doors.  Under the blazing sun, she asked me to get her another bottle of water. I was back with the bottle in a matter of seconds to find her taking one of her Camels from her purse, then tasting it like it was her first cigarette that day.

With director Volker Schlondorff during the filming

With director Volker Schlondorff during the filming of “A Degree of Murder” (1967)

I kept asking questions to her, one right after another, until from a cloud of smoke that made her look like in the days of Nellcote, she boldly said:“Are you gonna keep asking me questions all the time?” Oops. “Sorry, I cannot think of any other way to talk to you, Anita”, I honestly acknowledged. Then, a few minutes later, when I took out my pack of Marlboros and offered her one saying “Would you like a cigarette?”,unsuccessfully  trying not to make it sound like a question as much as possible (is there any other grammar way of saying so, after all?), she laughed histerically. “You said your name is Marcelo and that your family came from Italy, so what’s your last name?” Now it was Anita who asked the questions. “Sonaglioni, Marcelo Sonaglioni, and you know what, I never got to find out the story behind my last name and…” She stopped me. “¡Marcelo Sonaglioni!”, she said in a loud voice, like she was introducing me to an audience. “That’s the name of an Italian serpent!”, she assured, while I enjoyed my cigarette with Anita Pallenberg in the thick of more clouds of smoke, the girl whose ex boyfriend Keith Richards once dedicated the song “You Got the Silver”to, definitely as much dazzled as I felt now. With Adam back into scene, it was time to leave for the Konex, but I decided not to join the party this time, as I still had to meet my friend, as previously arranged. Anita grabbed my arm and I walked her up to the car. “Oh, aren’t you coming?”, she said. “Unfortunately I can’t, but I look forward to seeing you again soon. And thanks for an amazing time!” Hugs and kisses were exchanged, before she and Adam left in a taxi on their way to dad Michael’s exhibition.
Just last year, as I was about to travel to England, an interview with Anita had been almost confirmed (where I would have asked her all those questions I had in mind and had to keep to myself the day we had lunch), but then I was informed she broke one of her ribs, so it was postponed for another time, which now won’t ever happen.

88414-mordundtotschlag_fotos_werkfotos_sw_andyboulton_3_5_3_01-ii_016

The news first published by the Italian newspaper La Stampa on last June 13 was a bolt from the blue. Even though she had been experiencing several health issues over the last few years, Anita’s body clock finally determined it was time to stop. She died peacefully surrounded by her loved ones in a Chichester hospital, in West Sussex, not far from Redlands. How the world turns, before we got the shocking news I had already arranged to meet up with Adam on Wednesday, just a day after Anita passed away. We didn’t cancel it at all. Adam was already there when I got to the bar. He was really down, and quite sad and shaken. “You know, that was like losing my mother, because Anita was like a substitute mother to me…”, he told me. We realized we didn’t feel like talking anything, but about Anita. “Did you see Keith’s post on Facebook?”, Adam asked. “It reads ‘A most remarkable woman. Always in my heart.’ ”. Keith’s heartfelt post also included a picture of Anita, looking incredibly beautiful, originally shot by his father Michael. Adam was almost in tears. We ended up unwinding ourselves, like in all the wakes, a nice way to remember  the people we love, while I kept reminding him about the many stories we lived the day we had lunch with Anita, when both of us saw her for the last time, something I will thank Adam for forever.

DOS HORAS -Y ALGO MÁS- CON ANITA PALLENBERG

Standard
Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 24 de junio de 2017

“¿Te querés quedar a almorzar con nosotros?” ¿Cómo decirle no a semejante invitación cuando la propuesta parte de la mismísima Anita Pallenberg? Sucedió el año pasado, durante los días de la hasta ahora cuarta y última visita de los Rolling Stones a Buenos Aires como parte del Olé Tour, la gira latinoamericana que había comenzado unos días antes en Santiago de Chile, y que se extendería por diez  fechas más culminando con una presentación en La Habana, Cuba, a modo de broche de oro. Para la ocasión, y a fines de que los fans no desborden los accesos al hotel o incluso terminen acampando a sus alrededores, esta vez el equipo de logística del grupo había designado una nueva estrategia: separar a los miembros de la banda en diferentes destinos. Jagger se alojó en el Palacio Duhau Park Hyatt y Ronnie Wood en el Hotel Faena, mientras que el Four Seasons (donde la primera plana stoniana sí se había instalado en su totalidad en todas sus visitas anteriores, ocupando la mansión Álzaga Unzué) fue la base de operaciones de Charlie Watts y Keith Richards. Y también parte de esta anécdota, recuerdo informal -y emocionado- de un fan. 
 
Tal como se viene observando desde hace al menos un cuarto de siglo, a medida que los Stones se hacían mayores y sumaban hijos a sus familias la tradición de llevarlos de gira junto a ellos acabó convirtiéndose en un hecho folklórico. Hijos, esposas y hasta padres (en la primera visita de la banda al país, en 1995, fue el mismísimo Bert Richards, padre de Keith, quien también se paseó por estos lares) terminaron sumándose al equipo de gira que los Stones arrastran a su paso por el planeta. Pero nunca sus ex-mujeres. Por eso me tomé todo el atrevimiento posible de pecar de escéptico cuando una amiga inglesa que había venido a Sudamérica para presenciar algunos de los shows del tour -que, al igual que los Stones, también se estaba alojando en el Four Seasons- me confesó haber visto esa tarde a Anita Pallenberg en la pileta del hotel. Se lo refuté desde el vamos. “¿Anita? Imposible”, le dije. “Anita no viaja con el grupo desde hace mínimamente 35 años, al menos desde que cortó relaciones directas con Keith. Y aún cuando estaban juntos, jamás fue de seguir las giras. Debés haber visto a alguien muy parecida”. Y mucho menos en Sudamérica, me decía para mis adentros. Le pregunté insistentemente si había trabado conversación con ella. “No, no hablé”, me confesó, “pero te aseguro que era Anita. Estaba nadando a mi lado, tenía un traje de baño de leopardo…”. Podría haber continuado rechazándole toda posibilidad de veracidad del hecho explícitamente, queen lo que a mi refiere nada me iba a convencer que estaba en un perfecto error. Al fin y al cabo, me dije, todo el mundo ve gente “parecida a” por todas partes.
 
ANITA EN ARGENTINA. La última vez que Anita Pallenberg había visitado estos hemisferios fue para las navidades de 1968, cuando en ocasión de un crucero de placer junto a Richards, Marianne Faithfull y su por entonces novio Mick Jagger, el insigne cuarteto  desembarcó en Brasil, donde pasaron sus vacaciones en las ciudades de Matão  (en el interior del estado de São Paulo, donde Richards se inspiró para componer “Honky Tonk Women”), Rio y Bahia, antes de dirigirse por unos días más a Perú. Por esos años Anita ya se había convertido en la compañera de vida oficial de Keith luego de que en 1967 el guitarrista de los Stones la “rescatara” de los brazos de su co-equiper Brian Jones, su pareja original, con quien compartió una relación idílica hasta que el pelirrojo guitarrista, presa de la paranoia y desbordado de adicciones, comenzara a ejercer la violencia física sobre ella. La teoría de mi amiga sobre el avistaje de Anita en Buenos Aires 48 años más tarde de aquella oportunidad era, cuando menos, inimaginable. Sin embargo, quiso el destino que mientras me paseaba por el lobby del hotel al día siguiente, aguardando el encuentro con otro amigo que también se alojaba allí, pude ver a una mujer de rasgos muy similares a los de Anita  (por lo menos la Anita de esos días, con cuya imagen de “señora mayor” estaba familiarizado tras haber visto unas fotos recientes en alguna página de noticias), la cual rápidamente salió de uno de los ascensores para dirigirse a otro sector del hotel. La escena no duró más de medio segundo, y pensando si al fin y al cabo no había sido producto de mi imaginación o -en el mejor de los casos- si no se trataba simplemente de alguien con un gran parecido, opté por olvidarme del asunto.

PERFORMANCE AP MIRROR RS 11 copia

Foto: Michael Cooper

Pero la ilusión terminó convirtiéndose en hecho el día del segundo de los tres shows de los Stones en la Plata. En momentos previos al conciertos, mientras me encontraba en el sector VIP del evento, vi cómo esa señora tan parecida a Anita que el día anterior me había llamado la atención saliendo del ascensor del hotel era ni más ni menos la que ahora, a unos cinco metros de distancia, se dirigía a una de las mesas del VIP. Nada iba a tirar por la borda mi escepticismo, para qué negarlo. Más aún, ninguno de los muchos asistentes al recinto parecía haber puesto la mirada en la distinguida dama en cuestión, lo cual mantenía la improbabilidad de la situación: había pasado inadvertida ante los ojos de los demás asistentes, lo cual tampoco hubiera resultado nada improbable. Claro que la señora que se parecía a Anita iba acompañada de mi amigo Adam Cooper, y eso significaba un giro de 180 grados en lo que tozudamente negaba desde el vamos. Para aquellos que no están familiarizados con su nombre, Adam es hijo de Michael Cooper, legendario fotógrafo inglés que retrató como pocos la escena del rock de su país de origen de los 60 y buena parte de los 70 y, entre otras grandes obras, el responsable de las portadas  de los célebres álbumes “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” y de “Their Satanic Majesties Request”. Nada más y nada menos.

vip stones La Plata

Anita y el autor de esta nota: tiempos de sector VIP en La Plata, antes del más reciente show de los Stones

UN ENCUENTRO CON ADAM. Adam vive en Buenos Aires desde hace al menos dos décadas (muchos recordarán las varias exhibiciones fotográficas que organizó con buena parte de la obra de su padre), y a quien yo ya había conocido por aquellos tiempos,  poco después de su arribo al país. Pero mucho antes de todo eso, cuando todavía era el niño que vivía junto a su padre en el Chelsea londinense de mediados de los 60, Adam, de madre original prácticamente ausente, a través de la amistad y cercanía permanente de papá Michael con los Stones había encontrado en Marianne Faithfull  y Anita Pallenberg una suerte de madres sustitutas. Dos, a falta de una. Marianne y Anita lo mimaban, lo invitaban a jugar a sus casas, haciéndolo formar parte de una escena cultural histórica de la cual sólo tomaría conciencia con el correr de los años. Y yo sabía que Adam se mantenía en contacto con ellas, a pesar del paso del tiempo y también de la distancia. Ya no quedaba espacio para dudas: aquella señora que mi amiga había visto en la piscina del hotel, o la tan parecida a Anita que yo había divisado por un microsegundo en el lobby del lugar, era finalmente Anita Pallenberg.

Tuve que tragarme mis palabras, más que nunca ahora que la veía charlando con Adam en medio del alboroto generalizado del VIP, mientras me dirigía sigilosamente hacia ellos con la intención de plasmar algún tipo de recuerdo en mi memoria. Saludé a Adam y me presenté ante Lady Anita; le manifesté mi alegría de verla de visita en el país y, finalmente, le pregunté si podía tomarme una foto con ella, algo que resultaba ir en contra de mi propia ética. Por una serie de motivos, siempre me pareció mal pedir fotos. No sólo porque nunca me pareció correcto invadir el tránsito de nadie, sino más aún porque una foto sin una historia que la produzca es simplemente eso, una imagen capturada por un lente y un botón que la dispara; un momento que carece de naturalidad, forzado y artificial, de tantos de esos que hoy día suelen pulular en las redes sociales, para efímero placer de sus protagonistas de la era del vacío, sin un antes, sin un mientras y sin un después. Tampoco quería que Anita pensara que era simplemente “otro fan” acumulador de fotos, pero al mismo tiempo sabía que la tiranía del tiempo no me iba a permitir declararle mi admiración por su persona (Anita siempre fue uno de mis íconos femeninos favoritos, más allá de mi eterna devoción por las vidas y los tiempos de los Stones, de los que ella es parte fundamental) y que esa posible fotografía, reitero, no iba a ser más que el retrato de un instante de estilo pasajero. Y entonces Anita, la dama, accedió gentilmente, exhibiendo su sonrisa resplandeciente marca registrada a través de los años. Bastó con menos de dos minutos, el tiempo exacto que me indicó que hubiera renunciado a toda fotografía de haber podido ocuparlos para intercambiar unas palabras y así poder sondear su mirada con más detenimiento.  Fuera de ahí, fuera del ruido, y en el marco indicado.  Más tarde le pediría a mi amiga británica disculpas por mi capacidad de descreimiento ante ciertas aseveraciones…

ANITA KONEX

Anita posando en el Konex  (Foto: Adam Cooper)

ALMORZANDO CON ANITA. Dos días más tarde, aquel 12 de febrero de 2016 amaneció con un clima insoportable, siendo el segundo mes del año más caluroso en la historia del distrito, tal como lo confirmaban los meteorólogos. Aún restaba un tercer y último concierto de los Stones en el Estadio Único de La Plata el sábado, pero una vez más, y a pesar de la temperatura sofocante, tuve que volver al Four Seasons para encontrarme con un amigo neozelandés que también vino al país para asistir a los shows. Minutos después de mi llegada al lugar, me topé nuevamente con Adam, tan amable como siempre, que se acercó a saludarme. Le pregunté a qué se debía su visita, y con toda la parsimonia posible me contestó que estaba allí para almorzar con Anita en el restaurante del hotel. No titubeé ni por un instante y le manifesté lo importante que sería para mí poder intercambiar unas palabras con ella, ahora que sí estábamos en el marco adecuado, bien lejos de la agitación de rigor previa a un concierto. “Claro que sí”, me aseguró, “debe estar bajando en el ascensor”. Agregué que todo lo que deseaba (y quien sea que esté leyendo estas líneas, créame que fue meramente así) era quizás acompañarlos hasta la mesa, saludarla nuevamente y despedirme. Remarco una vez más que no me gusta interceptar ninguna situación que no me competa.

Anita apareció en cuestión de instantes, elegantemente vestida, de bohemio estilo, vestido y cartera de leopardo  y sombrero beige, apoyándose en un bastón para caminar, tan refinada como siempre, con su enorme sonrisa. Nos saludó, y segundos después nos encaminamos a Nuestro Secreto, el restó al cual se accede directamente desde la entrada de La Mansión. Sabía que el tiempo nuevamente iba a resultar escaso, al menos desde mis posibilidades, pero como fuera, estaba más que conforme con poder acompañarlos hasta el lugar y de paso intercambiar unas palabras. Desde ya, no había manera de que recordara nuestro veloz encuentro anterior, ni tampoco necesidad de refrescarle la memoria. Por eso, cuando finalmente arribamos al lugar del almuerzo, cumpliendo con lo prometido, me despedí. Fue cuando Anita me propuso lo inesperado, invitándome a quedarme a compartir el encuentro junto a ella y Adam. En el lugar justo, en el momento indicado. Y por si aún existía la posibilidad de aceptar la invitación sólo por un motivo de suerte, me regaló otra de sus sonrisas fulgurantes una vez que asentí y me senté junto a ellos para disfrutar de un momento inolvidable. No recuerdo qué pedimos, lo cual resulta raro para alguien tan detallista como yo, pero sí que los tres invitados bebimos agua mineral. Algunos pormenores, aunque mínimos, simplemente se escapan. Es el precio que se paga por poner mucha más atención en lo que una charla relajada con una mujer de personalidad avasallante depara. Es lo menos que puede suceder al comunicarse con alguien que lo vivió (casi) todo, y con la cual prácticamente todo dato histórico de rigor termina resultando secundario ante su enorme cultura y su disponibilidad.

Gerard-Malanga-Andy-Warhol-Edie-Sedgwick-Chuck-Wein-Anita-Pallenberg-guest

Gerard Malanga, Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Chuck Wein, Anita Pallenberg y una invitada.

HISTORIA VIVA Y HUMO ELECTRÓNICO. El lector podrá preguntarse cómo es que no abordé ninguno de los temas o hechos  relevantes que Anita cosechó a lo largo de su vida. Vaya como respuesta que simplemente por ser datos conocidos, la necesidad de preguntarle por ellos hubiera resultado absolutamente innecesaria. Y que después de todo, aquí no había ninguna entrevista de por medio, ninguna misión periodística ni informativa, sino una charla distendida con toda la informalidad que ameritaba (fue adorable disfrutar de su poderoso sentido del humor a través de las casi 2 horas que duró el almuerzo), y dejar que, sencillamente, fluya. De no haber resultado así seguramente le hubiera preguntado por los días en que fue expulsada de una escuela de pupilos a los 16 años para acabar bandeándose por algunas de las grandes capitales europeas, o su experiencia en New York como parte del grupo selecto que poblaba The Factory bajo la batuta de Andy Warhol. Mucho antes de su ingreso a las filas de los Rolling Stones, Anita ya era una rebelde empedernida, un destino natural rico en virtudes y sensaciones varias (fuera de su asombrosa belleza física, manejaba cinco idiomas) que supo explotar del mismo modo. Es por tal motivo que escucharla hablar resultara tan extremadamente simpático y, fuera del inglés que dominó la charla (caracterizado por un fuerte acento mitad italiano- mitad alemán) cada tanto proponía alguna frase o palabra en otra de las lenguas que dominaba. Nos confesaba su predilección por el clima caluroso, y su huída cada vez que llegaba el frío al lugar que estaba habitando. Es que Anita repartía su tiempo viviendo en al menos cuatro destinos en el mundo, principalmente en la casa propiedad de Keith Richards en Ocho Ríos, Jamaica, donde el clima no le resultaba problema alguno, y escapándose de los otros paraderos también del mismo dueño (la histórica casa de Keith de Redlands en Sussex, Inglaterra, o la de la calle Cheyne Walk en el Chelsea Embankment londinense, o de su Roma natal, de donde recuerdo señaló haber tenido, o seguir teniendo una hermana que vivía allí). Todo entre permanentes bocanadas de humor artificial disparadas por su cigarrillo electrónico.

PERFORMANCE MJ & AP PERFORMANCE RS 4

Anita y Mick Jagger en el rodaje de “Performance” (1968)

ESA VIEJA MAGIA. Extremadamente bronceada, y con la piel algo arrugada a su edad, a sus 71 años de edad Anita aún mantenía el sex appeal que había sido su sello natural personal. Y si bien ya no contaba con la belleza física que la caracterizó, su peculiar forma de hablar, sumada a sus clásicos modales y su femineidad establecida, continuaban siendo parte de una personalidad atractiva en todo momento, con un halo que estaba a la misma altura.  Hay algo suficientemente raro que siempre me sucedió cuando tuve que estar frente a algún personaje histórico que me haya tocado conocer en persona, ya sea en situación de una entrevista o, como fue en este caso, el de un encuentro fortuito, y que es de alguna manera sentir que la persona en cuestión en realidad no se encuentra físicamente allí, tornándose todo el tiempo un collage interminable de imágenes y historias entremezcladas (las mismas que uno siempre contempló, las mismas que terminaron forjando al personaje en cuestión), y alejándose de lo que realmente está pasando en el autentico momento del encuentro. Básicamente me ocurrió con cualquier figura de peso que tuve oportunidad de conocer, y que, así las cosas, no logré separar de la verdadera realidad, con todo lo redundante que la frase pueda significar. Es como una dimensión dentro de otra, mientras ambas se desdibujan constantemente sobre la marcha. Por tal motivo, estar con Anita poco tuvo que ver con el hecho en sí, pero con un cortometraje ilimitado por donde figuraron las mil y una imágenes de ella que uno cierta vez presenció con el correr de los años, en fotografías o material en video. Que es lo mismo que le podría haber sucedido a un adorador de la carrera de los Rolling Stones, porque es innegable que Anita Pallenberg simboliza un elemento fundamental de la iconografía central de la banda. Porque si no existe una cuota de peligro (lejos de cualquier posibilidad amenazante, sino respecto a la situación de tensión que el género debe esencialmente conservar), el rock no es rock. Y Brian y Anita fueron los progenitores del estilo de la banda desde esa coyuntura original en sus años formativos. El primero aportó la imagen original y la actitud estilística de casi todo lo que llegaría después, y la inquietante Anita, con su mirada penetrante y su porte natural original de bad girl, fue la cereza en la torta para un plato irresistible de uno de los menúes centrales en toda buena mesa.

keith-richards-anita-pallenberg-1024x694

Brian Jones, Anita y Keith Richards: el triángulo original

MIL Y UNA PERFORMANCES. Por esa y mil razones más, a lo largo del almuerzo no logré quitar la mirada de su persona y ese halo inexplicable, mientras por mi mente desfilaban otros tantos millares de postales a los que uno asistió y que ahora se materializaban en la mesa de un restaurante. Aquellas de Anita junto a Keith en todas esas ocasiones que haría falta un archivo aparte para atesorar, Anita cortejando amorosamente a Mick en el film “Performance” (y la guerra de situaciones internas en la dupla Jagger/Richards que esa circunstancia produjo), Anita la “Gran Tirana” que  controla la ciudad subterránea donde aterriza Jane Fonda en la película “Barbarella” (mientras el director Roger Vadim luchaba por manejar sus emociones comandando los roles de dos de las mujeres más bellas del planeta), o en otro de sus roles fílmicos, el del largometraje “A Degree of Murder”, cuya banda original de sonido a cargo de su ex Brian Jones continúa permaneciendo inédita. Preferí inclinarme al viejo arte de la observación, mientras por mi cabeza seguía cruzándose un sinfín de imágenes imposible de detener protagonizadas por la musa stoniana por excelencia, e “it girl” de cepa durante buena parte de los años 60 y 70 (eso que los diccionarios definen como la frase informal para referirse a la mujer bella y de estilo poseedora de sex appeal sin la necesidad de lucir su sexualidad), que a pesar del paso del tiempo y las arrugas no lograba evitar una sonrisa irresistible a la que alguna vez una revista de moda británica citó como “esa sonrisa de bruja”. O la chica que todos querían tener.

barbarella

Anita en el film “Barbarella” (1968)

EL LIBRO QUE NUNCA FUE. En este mediodía estival en el restaurante de un lujoso hotel de Buenos Aires estaba la mujer por cuyas venas circularon vastas correntadas de opiáceos, cuando ser un yonqui respondía exclusivamente a una decisión propia y no a una pose snob celebrada por los lentes de las cámaras. La del aporte definitivo a la concepción de la canción “Sympathy For The Devil”, en lo que determinara un año clave en la imaginería del grupo del cual muchos la consideraban “el sexto Stone”. “¿Es verdad que la idea de los ‘oohs, ooh, oohs’ de esa canción fueron idea tuya?”… Prefiero abstenerme de preguntárselo. Posiblemente no le interesara aclararme nada de eso, ni repasar viejas páginas de su historia, lo que decididamente dejó en claro cuando se me ocurrió sugerirle por qué no escribir una autobiografía alguna vez, y a lo que respondió “Porque no me acuerdo de nada”. Fue una manera rápida y concisa de explicar la verdadera historia detrás de la respuesta, que es la de su reticencia declarada a no hacerlo, previendo que cualquier editor posible sólo lo hubiera hecho con el mero interés de ofrecerle a los lectores historias de neto corte amarillista, las que seguramente hubieran vendido cantidades de copias, pero que a cambio hubieran pasado por alto otros capítulos que la hubieran definido más acertadamente. Tampoco fue necesario repasar su aporte fundamental a la mística de los Stones, entonces. Bastó y sobró con dejar que se expresara por sí misma, declarando su amor incondicional por la historia del grupo y que ahora, de grande, se preguntaba cada vez que presencia las escenas de fanatismo adonde los Stones se dirijan: “¿No se dan cuenta que ya son tipos grandes y que cuando vuelven de un concierto necesitan irse a dormir y descansar?” Esta vez fue ella quien me formuló una pregunta. “Seguramente”, respondí, “pero no creo que podamos hacer mucho al respecto”. Me devolvió una sonrisa, como las tantas otras que se dieron durante la charla, seguida de otra bocanada de humo artificial.
Tampoco faltarían sus comentarios sobre los días en Toronto de 1977, cuando fue detenida junto a Richards en el aeropuerto de la ciudad tras habérseles encontrado una buena cantidad de heroína, lo que casi le vale al guitarrista una temporada tan extensa en la cárcel como para haber puesto fin a la mismísima carrera de los Stones. Richards lograría la emisión de un nuevo visado que le permitió regresar a los Estados Unidos tiempo después, situación que a Anita, habitante de su esfera personal ante todo y sin contar con los mismas ventajas que la fama de un músico puede traer aparejadas, le valió al menos una década y media sin poder retornar a aquel país. “Fue el peor momento de mi vida”, nos confesaría, mientras ordenábamos otra botella de agua mineral.  Más curioso aún fue cuando propuso abordar un repaso breve sobre la situación política argentina del momento, que entre cambios de gobierno y explicaciones en vano sobre la medida del “cepo” monetario de la administración anterior (y donde no faltó más de un “¿por qué?”), prefirió cambiar de tema para dejar en claro cuánto amaba a sus hijos y a sus nietos. El plan posterior al almuerzo iba a ser el que tenía previamente agendado, la invitación de Adam a que visite “Early Stones, by Michael Cooper”, la exhibición con fotografías de los Stones tomadas por su padre que Adam estaba llevando adelante por esos días en el espacio Ciudad Cultural Konex, a la que Anita había prometido visitar aquella tarde y de la cual iba a ser invitada ilustre para revisar en persona buena parte de su historia, enfrentándose a imágenes de las cual ella también formaba parte. Con solo un show más de los Stones pendiente a tener lugar al día siguiente, y dejando de sumarse al resto de la gira latinoamericana (“no la voy a seguir, después de aquí regreso a Jamaica”) abandonamos el recinto para emprender camino a la muestra de imágenes en blanco y negro en la que Adam, lleno de emoción, homenajeaba una vez más a su padre y al temprano mundillo Stone del que Pallenberg había sido pieza fundamental.

Anita y Silvia Cooper, esposda de Adam, en la muestra en el Konex

En la muestra del Konex junto a Silvia, esposa de Adam (Foto: Adam Cooper)

FUMANDO AL SOL. Antes de tomar el ascensor que nos iba a llevar a la planta baja del hotel barajé la chance de tomarme una fotografía con ella: “Anita, odio pedir fotos, pero me gustaría que nos tomemos una como recuerdo de lo que para mí fue gran momento”; “No, que no tengo puesto nada de maquillaje”, me contestó sinceramente, valiéndose de otra de sus sonrisas arquetípicas. Fue cuando deduje que, después de todo, y desafiando la lógica, al menos por esta vez las mil palabras iban a valer más que una imagen. Claro que mucho menos me esperaba que la jornada todavía me tuviera deparada un bonus inesperado. Fue cuando al llegar a la puerta principal de ingreso al Four Seasons, inmersos en una temperatura que para esa hora ya había superado los 35 grados reales, Adam nos pidió que lo esperemos un momento. El momento finalmente terminó extendiéndose por algo más de diez minutos, en los que Anita y yo nos quedamos a solas sentados en uno de los bancos de la entrada del hotel. Bajo un sol abrasador, me pidió que le consiga otra botella de agua mineral. Volví a estar sentado junto a ella en tiempo record, mientras sacaba un Camel de su cartera para saborearlo como si fuera el primer cigarrillo del día de todo fumador empedernido.

With director Volker Schlondorff during the filming

Con el director Volker Schlondorff, durante la filmación de “A Degree of Murder” (1967)

PREGUNTAS VS. RESPUESTAS. Continué haciéndole preguntas, una tras otra, hasta que, en medio de la nube de humo que la hacía verse como en una postal de Nellcote de 1972, me disparó contundentemente: “¿Pensás seguir haciéndome preguntas todo el tiempo?”. “No sé de qué otra manera dirigirme”, le reconocí con todo el peso de la verdad, por lo que minutos después, cuando saque mi atado de Marlboro y le ofrecí uno  diciendo “¿Querés un cigarrillo?”, evitando que suene a pregunta sin posibilidades de éxito (¿acaso había otra forma gramatical de hacerlo?), se rió histéricamente. “Me dijiste que te llamabas Marcelo y que tu familia paterna provenía de Italia, pero cuál es tu apellido?”. Ahora era ella la que preguntaba. “Sonaglioni, Marcelo Sonaglioni”, le apunté. “Y sabés qué,  jamás pude saber el origen detrás de mi apellido y…” Me interrumpió. “¡Marcelo Sonaglioni!”, exclamó en perfecto italiano, con un tono de celebración como si hubiese estado anunciando mi nombre ante una audiencia. “Tu apellido tiene que ver con el nombre de una serpiente italiana”, me aseguró convencida, mientras yo disfrutaba de mi cigarrillo fumando a solas junto a Anita Pallenberg, la chica a la que su ex novio Keith Richards le había dedicado “You Got the Silver” tan deslumbrado como yo. Surgió la invitación para ir con ella y Adam al Konex, una nueva aventura a la que no pude sumarme para poder cumplir con el compromiso original que tenía para esa tarde. Anita me tomó del brazo y la acompañé hasta el auto. “¿No venís?”, me preguntó. “Desafortunadamente no puedo hacerlo ahora, pero espero verte nuevamente, y gracias por un almuerzo inolvidable”, atiné a decirle. Intercambiamos abrazos y besos, antes de que el taxi de Anita y Adam partiera rumbo a la exhibición fotográfica de papá Michael. El año pasado, con motivo de un viaje personal a Londres, había logrado tramitar una entrevista con Anita en la que esa vez seguramente no iban a faltar todas las preguntas que me hubiera gustado formularle el día del almuerzo, pero poco antes sufrió la rotura de una costilla, por lo que debió ser cancelada para una futura oportunidad que ahora, dado el rigor de los acontecimientos sucedidos, no podrá tener lugar.

 


EPÍLOGO.
La noticia publicada primeramente por el diario italiano La Stampa el martes 13 de junio pasado cayó como un balde de agua helada. Si bien eran de conocimiento los diversos problemas de salud que venía enfrentando en los últimos años, el reloj biológico de Anita Pallenberg marcó que era la hora de cambiar de escena. Falleció rodeada de familiares en un hospital de Chichester, la ciudad británica al oeste de Sussex, muy cerca de su amada Redlands, donde vivió algunas de sus más recordadas páginas a la que ahora se agregó un último capítulo definitivo. Por esas vueltas del destino, días antes de la noticia de la muerte de Anita ya tenía pactado un encuentro con mi amigo Adam al día siguiente de lo sucedido. Cuando llegué al bar, Adam ya estaba esperándome. Se lo veía cabizbajo, notablemente conmovido, emocionado hasta las lágrimas. “Fue como perder a una madre, porque Anita fue como una madre sustituta para mi, ya sabés…” El motivo original del encuentro pasó a segundo plano, para terminar favoreciendo una charla dedicada exclusivamente a un ícono definitivo. “¿Leíste el mensaje de Keith en Facebook? ‘Una mujer notable. Siempre en mi corazón’”. El texto iba acompañado de una foto de Anita, invariablemente bella, que su padre Michael había plasmado. Adam tenía los ojos llenos de lágrimas. Terminamos relajándonos y sonriendo, como suele pasar en los velatorios, una distensión natural y necesaria que nos permite recordar a los seres que admiramos de manera más distendida, mientras no dejaba de mencionarle a mi estimado amigo todas las historias vividas aquel día del almuerzo junto a ella, cuando la vimos los dos por última vez, y del cual le estaré agradecido a Adam eternamente.
 
(Agradecimientos: Adam Cooper)

 

SISTER MARIANNE – Marianne Faithfull & Marc Ribot, “An intimate evening” – Teatro Coliseo, Buenos Aires, 22 de septiembre de 2011

Standard

Publicado en Evaristo Cultural en octubre 2011

“Ya saben, todavía sigo fumando…” Habían transcurrido apenas 50 minutos de show, los que no se extenderían por mucho más, y Marianne Faithfull no tuvo el más mínimo reparo en fundamentar las razones por las que, naturalmente, no se privaba de toser, cuando le fuere necesario hacerlo. Los mismos motivos que transformaron su afinadísima garganta adolescente, en la cavernosa voz que hoy, a sus 64 años, sigue portando, décadas mediante de tabaquismo y demás excesos. Más precisamente cuando fue descubierta por Andrew Loog Oldham, mánager y productor original de los Rolling Stones, y quien no dudó en presentarla ante los medios británicos como “un ángel con tetas” Una trayectoria que va de ícono indiscutible de la escena más vital del Swinging London de los ’60s (cuando se convirtió nada más y nada menos que en “la novia de Mick Jagger”, y por ende en indiscutible musa stoniana, estereotipo del cual Faithfull nunca logró desprenderse), hasta su regreso a la escena a fines de los 70s, sin antes haber deambulado por las calles de Londres como heroinómana oficial. Fue precisamente Faithfull, ávida lectora y con un background cultural enorme, noble descendiente de Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (aquel escritor y periodista austríaco que inspiró el término “masoquismo”) quien refinó a Jagger y lo insertó en el mundillo de la aristocracia británica. Lo que sugería ser, tal como fuera anunciado en los afiches publicitarios, “Marianne Faithfull y Marc Ribot, An Intimate Evening”, superó la escala de intimidad prometida y acabó siendo un derroche de majestuosidad y simpleza de una artista que no necesita de aditivos escénicos para manifestarse. Se trataba de su primera visita como artista a esta parte del mundo (sólo lo había hecho anteriormente en calidad de turista y en pleno affaire con Jagger, también en Brasil, cuatro décadas atrás en el tiempo), tramo iniciado con dos show en Porto Alegre apenas unos diás antes de su arribo a Buenos Aires. Tan sólo le bastó a la gran dama un micrófono de pié, un banco (que nunca usó, prefiriendo permanecer parada a lo largo del concierto, incluso esbozando suaves pasos de danza, con las manos en los bolsillos de su oscuro saco), un atril con partituras, y la imprescindible presencia del eximio guitarrista Marc Ribot, éste en exclusivo plan acústico y coros (cuya grandielocuencia merecería un párrafo aparte), y acaso más conocido por sus sesiones de estudio junto a artistas de la talla de Tom Waits, Elvis Costello y la mismísima Faithfull, entre otros. Y su voz, claro, aquella voz! Sorpresivamente, la cantante decidió comenzar su show arrancando por el final, esto es, con la canción ‘Horses and High Heels’, que también es título de su último trabajo de estudio. A lo largo de la velada, que se extendió por cautivantes 70 minutos, Faithfull propuso una lista de temas concisa, pero que jamás dejó de rozar la perfección, donde no faltaron los clásicos (‘The Ballad of Lucy Jordan’, aquella que acompañó su regreso a la palestra artística como parte del álbum Broken English de 1979, y tras un puñado de años como inalterable junkie en las calles de Londres, canción homónima que también realizó), y otras grabaciones más contemporáneas que, fiel a su estilo, Faithfull le introdujo a la audiencia una tras otra, dialogando con ésta en todo momento, bajando línea, hablando de su vida (“Ahora vivo en París, amo París! Hay veces en que salgo a caminar por la ciudad y regreso a casa pensando en que no ha pasado nada, es todo muy estilo Seinfeld…”) Así desfilaron ‘That’s How Every Empire Falls’, indicando que se refería a los Estados Unidos y la caída de su imperio (“El imperio maligno, que está cayendo…y lo mejor de todo es que no tuvimos que hacer nada, lo hicieron ellos solos…”) No faltó más material de Horses and High Heels (‘Prussian Blue’, ‘Love Song’ –popularizada por Elton John en los ’70s–, ‘Why Did We Have to Part’), intercalando un cover de ‘The Crane Wife’, de los Decemberists, y que Faithfull incluyera en Easy Come Easy Go, álbum lanzado en 2008. Pero fue el resto de las canciones, en su mayoría también covers, que conmovió a la audiencia (apenas unas 800 personas, en un show que contó con escasa promoción y que apoyó la inauguración del Faena Arts Center, por donde la artista pasó brevemente) Desde ‘Solitude’ (de Duke Ellington), a ‘Working Class Hero’ de Lennon, que Faithfull coronó alzando su puño izquierdo en señal de victoria, hasta ‘Baby Let Me Follow You Down’, de Bob Dylan, único momento en que Ribot abandonó la guitarra acústica para cambiarla por el ukelele. Inevitablemente, el set no pudo dejar de incluir ‘As Tears Go By’, que la dupla Jagger-Richards creó para catapultar la carrera de Faithfull allá por 1965 (“canción que un par de tipos escribieron para mí” y, eventualmente, la misma canción que llevó a la artista a ganar popularidad, y ‘Sister Morphine’, que los Stones incluyeron en el celebradísimo Sticky Fingers de 1971 y cuya co-autoría junto a Jagger jamás fue reconocida como tal (“tal vez conozcan esta canción, la escribí con un tipo de quien no me acuerdo el nombre”) Ironías aparte (después de todo no podían faltar las alusiones stonianas de la que Marianne tanto rezonga, ¿verdad?), y cuando parecía que ya no quedaba ningún corazón por exprimir, Faithfull deleitó con una intimísima (debemos reiterar la omnipresente intimidad del concierto a la que la audiencia se vió sometida?) versión de ‘Strange Weather’, que Tom Waits compuso para ella, y que dio título al disco del mismo nombre, editado en 1987. Para el final, ahora sí, el bis fue sólo para la gran dama y su versión a capella de ‘Love is Teasing’, de los legendarios Chieftains, que sonó tan irlandesa como el país de origen de sus autores, momento en que se acercó al público y apretó manos, un gesto más para describir la enorme intimidad propuesta a lo largo de la velada, y a cuya descripción hizo delicado honor. Aquél “ángel con tetas” de los ’60s, entonces, con toda su elegancia, finalmente pudo quebrar sus alas. Y las almas volvieron a respirar.