AN INTERVIEW WITH ROBERTA BAYLEY – “THERE WAS NOBODY MORE PUNK THAN LITTLE RICHARD”

Estándar

By Marcelo Sonaglioni and Frank Blumetti

If this article defied its usual style and started by the end of the meeting described here, it should refer to the very minute before the “thanks and goodbye” to the person interviewed, when one of the interwievers took out a book about the New York rock scene in the late ’70s from his bag, of which the interviewee was one of its most distinguished witnesses, and then proceeded to point out the picture he wanted to be autographed. “I know which ones are my pictures, you do not need to tell me!” What could be taken as some real temper is nothing but Roberta Bayley in pure punk attitude, the same that led her to become one of the chosen few who was there to catch the Big Apple punk scene through the lens of her camera close-up some 43-odd years ago and beyond. More than four decades later, at 68, Bayley is in Buenos Aires to host a photo exhibition portraying much of her work. A one-week stay, from Thursday to Thursday,where she was extensively interviewed, and during which she barely had the time to get around the city, which she says reminds her of Paris. Bayley talks a lot, and does it passionately, so much that usually gets ahead of the questions which still need to be asked, even adding something that really seems to make her pleased: not to be inquired “once again” about her famous photo on the cover of the first Ramones album (which, although usually considered her trademark shot, does little justice for the rest of her career) And later on deciding to acknowledge it by refusing to stop when somebody informs her it’s time to wrap up the interview: “No, not yet, I want to keep talking”, and that we interviewers had no choice but to accept.

Capture

Punk rock scene witness: Bayley and her camera in the ’70s

You were born in the West Coast, in Pasadena, California, but what exactly made you move to London afterwards, and then to New York?
Well, I left southern California when I was 4. I asked my mother not to send me, but she said “we’re going”. So we moved to Seattle, and I lived there till I was 7, and then we moved again to Marin County, which is just north of San Francisco, a very nice area. It’s a very wealthy neighborhood now, but it was middle-class at the moment. There was nature and we had a house on the hill, and a view, you know, and horses and pets. Then after I graduated at high school when I was 18, I went to college in San Francisco. Unfortunately my sister had been killed in a car accident in the same year, which was very disturbing. When I was 19, I had a boyfriend who was a musician, and we lived together for about a year. He’s still a very good friend of mine. And after my third year of college, I just quit, with not really much thought. And then I just said, “I’m going to London”. I bought a one-way ticket. The main reason was that I could be far away, and they just spoke my language, even when a funny accent, but they just spoke English there. Oh yeah, I was making a joke about the “funny language” thing… Anyway I’d always been a kind of anglophile, because I was a big Beatles and Rolling Stones fan, and all that, so I had an affinity for London, and I had a friend from San Francisco who was also a photographer, and who had moved there. We weren’t close friends but we knew each other, and he helped me with photography, ‘cause I was trying to learn. That was around 1970 or 1971, I think. Fred was staying in this very large apartment in London for free, and he said “there’s plenty of room, why don’t you come here?” So I just started living there, maybe getting a little job and working. I didn’t have a camera, I wasn’t taking pictures or anything like that. Out of that, I was really in the music scene, you had all these great music papers like the Melody Maker and the New Musical Express, and occasionally I’d go to music concerts. That’s when I saw The Temptations, or Al Green, in 1973. I was a huge fan of him. You know, the whole white suite, and he played at the Rainbow. And then when he came to New York I went to see him at the Apollo, which was completely amazing, as it was a different show. He was really sexy, and dirty, and cool. But back to London, I’d worked briefly with Malcolm McLaren. I lived in his neighborhood, so he and his wife would use to come in the restaurant where I worked as a waitress. Sometimes he needed someone to help him out, but it wasn’t anything to do with music. Although sometimes we’d go see bands together, and there was this band coming up that kinda was getting talked about a little bit called Kilburn and the High-Roads. They were sort of in the pub rock scene, and there was a radio show on Sundays called Honky Tonk with a gentleman called Charlie Gillett, he’s the one who wrote one of the early rock books, “Sound of the City”. I became friends with Charlie, and he started to manage Kilburn and the High-Roads. So one night they were playing in White Chapel. And there I met Ian Dury, we fell madly in love, and we hitchhiked back from White Chapel. But then I was leaving back to San Francisco, as that was already planned. So we had correspondence, and phone calls, he was begging me to go back to London.

Did you go back to London?
Yeah, we loved each other, so I went back. Then we lived together. The band was really struggling, we weren’t making any money. We lived in a squat in Stockwell, that’s close to Brixton. But it was great music. The Kilburns were really a weird band. I mean, they had a black crippled guy in the band, they had a midget, they had this guy Humphrey Ocean…It was his fake name, but he was a painter. He wasn’t really a musician, he sort of danced onstage…But they were really good and the songs were really original. Ian was an incredible performer, and incredibly charismatic. He was crippled himself. He had polio and ended up with a completely fucked-up leg. But he was completely unique. They finally got a record contract and made this record, but it didn’t do well, so he kind of said “I’m too poor, you should go back to America, as this isn’t a good situation”. I think he was also having an affair with his previous girlfriend Denise Roudette, who was also a musician, and a very beautiful woman.

Maybe that was another reason to go back home again. 03
Well I didn’t know that but I suspected it, and I didn’t want to have a boyfriend who was cheating on me. And you know, you have to hate the girlfriend, so she hated me and when I left, she took my fur coat. But she’s a beautifully spirited woman and I have great respect for her. I guess she played for a little bit in the Kilburns. So I left for New York. I didn’t know anyone in New York at all. I had one friend I vaguely remembered that had moved from San Francisco, but I had a list of names that my friends in London gave me, like, you know, “I’m a friend of Ian Dury”, and this woman said “yes, come and stay with me”. She had a big loft on Church Street. This was in 1974. But everybody was very helpful. And then I started working and I made some money. My first job in New York was as a nanny, because you had a place to live, and you had a salary, but it was part-time. But then one of those people from the list my friends had given me, he was in the music business, he worked as a roadie, you know, lighting, sound man, for the Rolling Stones and other big bands. He was really nice, he showed me all around New York and said “so what do you wanna do?” And I said “I wanna see the New York Dolls, because I never saw them”. Because when they played in San Francisco, I was in London. When they played in London, I was in San Francisco, and he said he was their soundman in New York, and then he knew them very well. And next week they were playing in this place called Club 82, which was a club in a place that had been owned by the mafia, and all the entertainment there was female impersonators, what we would now call drag queens. That was the history of the club but, by the time I went there, it was sort of a little disco. It became very popular because David Bowie visited, so everybody would go there because of that. The new bands were playing there, so the New York Dolls would play there. There was a disco in-between, so everybody could dance after the bands. So that was the first band I saw in New York, and afterwards my friend threw a party for the bands in his loft above, and some of the Dolls came, and also the opening band, a band called the Miamis, who were unknown, but they were one of my favourite bands at the time.

02Yes, we did an interview with Gary Lachman (Valentine) two years ago in London and he mentioned the Miamis.
Yeah, they were one of my favourites. They didn’t have the look, they were just Jewish guys with curly hair. It wasn’t a punk look. They were pop more than punk, but they were very good songwriters and very funny guys, and their songs had a lot of humour, but they never achieved success. I met David Johansen at the party, and he was very nice. And the funny thing is, it was Club 82, and the Dolls had never played there, so they said “well we’re playing Club 82, we should wear dresses”. I had heard the rumours of the faggots and all that, so the first time I saw them, David is wearing a strapless evening gown, a ladies’wig, and women’s high heels, so I said “oh these guys are weird”, but that was their thing, it was kind of a joke. I think that Johnny (Thunders) or Jerry (Nolan) said “oh no, I’m not wearing a dress” ‘Cause they were really macho guys, they were so not gay, you know. The music business was kind of afraid of them because of their album cover. They were in drag and people didn’t understand it. You know, homophobia, and all that.

Looks like seeing the Dolls live was a major turning point for everybody who was part of that late ‘70s scene in New York. Everybody went to see the New York Dolls.
Oh yeah, they were huge in New York. Mick Jagger and David Johansen would be at Max’s Kansas City, and people would go to David. They were bigger than anything. They were the coolest band, they had the best girlfriends and they looked the greatest. Later on the Dolls’ success was kind of going on the downhill, but everybody could see they were having a really good time. They were getting all the chicks, they were getting all the drugs, it was fun, and that’s what rock and roll is, so everybody started bands.

04

Bayley, about the New York Dolls: “They were the coolest band, they had the best girlfriends and they looked the greatest

Plus they had some image, it was very striking at the time. 
Yeah. And that’s when Malcolm McLaren came to manage the Dolls, and he put them in red pant leather, with the Communist flag, and all that. But the Dolls were amazing at their shows, I saw them, and they had bands like Television opening for them. The newer bands like Television wanted to distinguish themselves from glitter rock, they wouldn’t gonna wear lipstick. So Richard Hell created very specifically and intentionally this new look with the short hair. Nobody had short hair. In rock’n’roll, you had long hair. And they would have ripped clothes because, you know, their clothes ripped, and then they would fix it with a safety pin. It wasn’t fashion, it was something practical to live.

And then nobody expected that it would turn out to be a fashionable thing.
Well, Richard kind of thought if they wanted to get attention, they had to be different. You know, Richard Hell did the T-shirt for Richard Lloyd that said “please kill me” onstage. Richard Lloyd tried to dye his hair bleach but it turned green…

05

Richard Hell, punk pioneer: “He was very much into the surrealists”

How was living with Richard Hell?
With Richard? Weird. He wouldn’t let me water the plants, because he said “let it die, it’s survival, don’t water the plants” And then we had a mouse at the apartment, and I wanted to get rid of it, and he said “no! The mouse lives”

What do you mean? A mouse living with you? Not in a fish tank or something…
No, he was a loose mouse. But then I killed the mouse, and I threw it away, and he went “oh where’s the mouse?” I never told him I’d killed the mouse. We were just living together, and that’s how we lived. You know, we were poor. It wasn’t mean. He was very much into the surrealists, like Lautreaumont and Baudelaire. You know he’s a writer, and he was a poet.

We tried to contact him recently for an interview.
No, he doesn’t talk about music, he doesn’t want to. It’s almost impossible to get him to talk about music.  And I respect it because, say, I’m doing all these interviews and I’m always being asked the same thing, over and over again. “What was it like in the ‘70s?”, etc. For him it’s extremely boring. He hasn’t done any music since the ‘80s. He’s a writer now. He’s published novels, books, articles…He makes his living as a respected writer. So he doesn’t wanna talk about punk rock. You know, I understand him completely.

That’s easy to understand…
See, just before I left for Buenos Aires, I had somebody to interview me about Sid (Vicious) and Nancy (Spungen), because I knew them both. So the first question was, once again, “What was it like in the ‘70s?” I said to him, “look, I’m not writing your article for you. There’s many books and articles written about that. You go to the library, and in 2 weeks, you phone me back, and then you ask me some serious questions, because I can’t tell you the whole story. That’s your job, you’re the journalist!” That was Richard’s philosophy, and I understand that. Five years ago I probably would have answered that kind of questions, but now it’s like enough already. Go to the library. I mean you don’t even have to go to the library, go to the internet, it’s all right there. So then you can ask me a relevant question that shows you have some knowledge, and you won’t insult me (laughs)

sidney-with-vicious

Bayley and Sid Vicious

Hopefully our questions are interesting… 
Yeah, they are, it sounds like you kind of know my answers a little bit. I enjoy interviews, but sometimes you get tired of hearing “how did you take the Ramones picture?”

Back in time, how you did get the job at the CBGB’s?
Oh, because I was Richard Hell’s girlfriend. Television was the only band that used to play there only on Sunday night. Their manager was Terry Ork, so he said “Roberta you stay at the door and take the money, 2 dollars” So when the people came to go in, I told them they had to pay and convinced them to pay 2 dollars, they were gonna see a good band, and that’s the deal.

Theres a funny story about that concerning Legs McNeil.
Yes, he came to CBGB’s and he said “I’m Legs McNeil”. I’d never seen Punk magazine, nobody had seen it. It was brand new, it just came out, the first issue. And I said “no, it’s 2 dollars, you have to pay me”. And he said, “no, I get in for free”. And then I said, “well ok, give me a copy of the magazine”. And he said, “no, it’s 50 cents, behind the bar, you can buy it”. So I said, “all right, that’s pretty cool, you go in for free”. So I went to the bar, picked 50 cents and bought the magazine. After work, I went home, and I read the magazine, and then I said “man, I gotta work for these guys, this is incredible!” They weren’t sure about me. But we decided to do something like a photonovela. That meant going around to different clubs, and I’d take the pictures. We did all these great pictures and we had this great chemistry and a hilarious time, we had a lot of fun. So they said, “well, do you wanna work for us?”. So from that moment on, I worked for them till the end of the magazine.

So you had been already working as a photographer by then? What took you to becoming a photographer before entering the music scene?
Yeah, that was in 1976, and I’d started at the end of 1975. I had interest in photography since I was a little girl. You know, I had a little toy camera. But then photography was becoming popular among people. But then in high school, when I was 15, I also had a photography class, which was very simplistic. But I learnt how to develop a film, and how to print. I loved photography, and when they graded me, I got more pluses than minuses. My photography teacher liked my pictures very much, and he would give me an assignment, like taking pictures which showed movement. He was a history teacher, but his passion was photography. And then when I was about 19, I bought a Nikon. I wasn’t doing any music pictures at the times, but I did street photography. But at the time photography wasn’t still considered a form of art, it was still the black sheep in the art world. But then when I came to New York, I met everybody in the scene, like I told you…Club 82, and I was working at CBGB’s, everybody was really interesting, so it would have been really stupid not taking pictures.

Any reason in particular why most of the pictures were only in black and white?
Yeah, it was a decision, because I had no money. But I shot a lot of colour, anytime I could afford it, or else I was shooting both. And specially when I became involved with Blondie. But colour is more expensive. I was also extremely lucky that soon after I bought my camera, I had this friend, and he said “oh I have this dark room that somebody left in my apartment, I’ll let you use it for 6 months”. The entire darkroom, which was very large, with everything.

07

Pretty baby: Debbie Harry through the lens of Roberta Bayley

You did a lot of work with Blondie, and they were a very colourful band anyway. It would have been such a loss to shoot Debbie Harry only in black and white…
Yeah, and it was the same with the New York Dolls. And I think about it, because I’m always saying to people part of the reason the Ramones cover made such an impression is because it’s black and white, but there’s also a New York Dolls first cover that was b&w. It was unusual for rock bands. Folk music did a lot of b&w, Bob Dylan too. But rock bands usually used colour. Elvis’ was black and white, his first album for RCA, the one that The Clash copied. I’d do both, I had two cameras, so I could shoot colour and black and white. But the Ramones picture was black and white, as it was for Punk magazine.  We couldn’t afford printing in colour. Printing was so primitive, you couldn’t mix colour and b&w in the same page, which now is very common. So all we shot for Punk magazine was black and white. Stupidily, Bob Gruen was there the same day, so he has the pictures of Debbie in colour because, he was rich, and he could afford it (laughs) I mean, he wasn’t rich, but he was richer than me.

1

The Ramones on the cover of their debut album

Who would you say were the easiest and the hardest bands or musicians to work with? I know you loved shooting Iggy Pop, in fact you once said you wish you had photographed him more.
Oh yes. That’s right. But then I retired. I can call him on the phone (laughs) There’s a very fantastic interview of him and Anthony Bourdain, you can sure find it on YouTube. Iggy’s just the coolest person, and his conversation with Anthony is done at at Iggy’s house in Florida.

Back to the punk scene, a tricky question, which one do you think influenced the 08other one? Was it that the New York scene influenced the British one, or was it the other way round?
Now you’re showing me you’re ignorant! Sorry.

It’s ok.
The New York scene started in 1974. London’s scene started in 1976. So who influenced who? It’s New York! London took all the ideas from New York. The safety pins, the ripped clothing, and all that. But locally the British guys were very talented. You know, Glen Matlock, Steve Jones, Paul Cook

I actually didn’t mean to be serious. I was playing games with you.
But you wouldn’t believe, when I talk to stupid journalists, I always say “go out, just do your history!” We started it.

The right question then would be, is there a link between both scenes?
Of course! Malcolm McLaren! You know, Blondie became big in England first, before anywhere else, because Debbie (Harry) was very beautiful, and they played in Top of The Pops…Blondie had many hits in London. But then when they came back to New York, they knew that Johnny Rotten had copied Richard Hell, that it was the version of him. Johnny Rotten copied him off.

Somehow most of the people always thought that the whole punk thing started with the Sex Pistols.
You don’t explain to me, I’ll explain it to you, ok? This is how it works.

09

The Pistols caught onstage by Bayley: “The Sex Pistols were never big in the USA”

All right.
The Sex Pistols became huge in London because they said “fuck” on TV. You know, their record was banned. You couldn’t even advertise it, but you could sell it. And so, you know, they were huge in the press. At that time nobody knew about any of the New York bands, except in a small area. The Ramones were still obscure, but when they went to London on the 4th of July of 1976 and played at the Roundhouse, there in the audience was The Clash, the Sex Pistols, etc. They couldn’t even afford tickets, and Johnny Ramone went to the window and let them come in. They were just kids, but the Ramones were aware of the fans and the kids, and that they were the future next music. I don’t think the Ramones felt threatened, but I think they were very pissed off when the Sex Pistols sort of became more famous than them more quickly. But not really in the United States. The Sex Pistols were never big in the United States. But England’s a very small country, with three music papers. It was a completely different environment.

And then it just happened the other way round when the Pistols did their last tour in the USA. How was the experience?
That was really insane. They were just fed up, and Sid was detoxing from heroin. As a drug addict, he felt terrible. We had an idea of playing these weird cities, obscure cities in the south like Memphis, Baton Rouge, San Antonio…But that was all intentional.

I wouldn’t say risky, but definitely tough places. Like people throwing bottles at them…
Well, we were punks, we would take it… (laughs) But that was part of what was frustrating for the band because the band was really good. I missed the first two shows of the tour. My first one was San Antonio, with many people throwing things at them, insulting the band, “fuck you!” and all that. They were treating them like freaks. But there were still people that liked them, although a minority. You know, when you go to the south, Tulsa, Oklahoma…there are people who are Jesus freaks, like protesting, the devil’s music, and all that shit. So they were just frustrated and fed up with the whole thing, and Johnny said, “enough”, that’s in San Francisco.

Why do you think there’s so much interest in punk after all these years?
It’s the last underground music. There’s no way now to stay underground, you’re discovered immediately. You’re discovered before anything, even before you go to the studio and play. That’s my opinion. I don’t follow music anymore. It was like the ‘50s, which was true punk music, like Little Richard. Nobody more punk. Elvis Presley, nobody more punk. People say, “oh punk was the most revolutionary music”. Oh no, ‘50s rock’n’roll, and even more, black music. You know, and then the mid-‘60s and psychedelic bands, which was a different kind of music.

Just to think of Little Richard…He was black, gay, he used lipstick, he shook his ass at the piano. And that’s in the ‘50s! IMG_3310
Yeah, and that was David Bowie’s biggest influence, and his first as well. I heard Little Richard as my sister was 7 years older than me so, even as that little, I heard ‘Tutti Frutti’. I loved Little Richard. And Jerry Lee Lewis, another punk.

What about New York’s culture? Do you think of any change involved in the last years?
You know, New York will always be a center of culture. Today, it’s very hard for artists to live there because of the high cost of living. In the ’70s you could get a loft, a huge loft, for $200 a month. Now that would be $10,000 a month. For young people now, coming to the city, I don’t know how they do it.

I guess it’s the same with many bohemian areas in the main cities. Like Chelsea, in London. It used to be like that in the ‘60s, and affordable, and suddenly big companies or big clothing stores arrive and they turn into expensive and fashionable places.
Oh yeah, it’s the same with Soho in New York. Because at the time it was dead. Tribecca was also dead. Any neighborhood you name. Only the Bronx is still probably rough. My neighborhood is too crowded now. It used to be more serene. But I never go out at night, so I don’t give a shit.
10How long have you’ve been living in the same place?
Almost 45 years, since 1975. It’s a tiny apartment, 400 square feet.  7 floors, no elevator. So I go 7 floors up and down. I have no choice. Or I could sleep on the floor. It means nothing to me, I’ve been doing it a long time. It’s quite healthy. And the other thing, it’s actually illegal in New York to have seven, so all the buildings around have six. So I have an incredible view, and beautiful light. Because there are no buildings next to me. This is what I say to myself when I’m on the stairs, “you have good light!” (laughs)

Regarding your exhibition, do you feel like an artist showing her works, or more of a witness of an era? Did you visit Buenos Aires around already?
Oh, both. I haven’t really seen anything except the gallery, the gallery, the hotel, the gallery…But I will. I long to come back.

Doesn’t it feel a bit strange coming down here to show your works?
I feel wonderful! I don’t feel strange. It’s a fantastic feeling, I’m very pleased and it’s really exciting. I get a little bit in New York. I also got quite a little bit when I went to Tokyo. You know, they’re also big fans of the Ramones and Punk Rock. I was like a mini-celebrity there, but still not as big as here. I don’t want to do it every day of my life, I‘d lose my mind.

So this is your first time in Argentina, but is it also your first time in South America? Not even in Brazil?
Yes. Not even in Brazil. First time down the equator.

What would be punk’s biggest legacy to the world?
It’s the idea of “do it yourself”. Don’t wait to be an expert. Give it a try, make a mistake, it’s ok. You know, if you feel like doing something, you don’t have to sit in your room practicing the guitar for 5 years, just go out with three chords. That’s all you need. Do it. Because that’s why we did. I didn’t know how to do photography.

One last question, considering lately we saw you in many pictures with your dog. So looks like suddenly you changed from pictures with “punks” to pictures with “pugs”.
Yeah, dogs and musicians are not different.

ENTREVISTA: ROBERTA BAYLEY – “NADIE FUE MÁS PUNK QUE LITTLE RICHARD”

Estándar

Por Marcelo Sonaglioni y Frank Blumetti

Si este texto desafiara la práctica habitual y comenzara por el final del encuentro que aquí retrata, debería referirse al instante previo del gracias y adiós a la entrevistada de turno, cuando uno de los dos entrevistadores extrajera de su bolso un libro de fotografía de rock neoyorquina del rock de finales de los ’70, de la cual la susodicha es una de sus representantes más insignes, y le señalara la foto de su autoría que pretendía le firmase. “¡Sé muy bien cuáles son mis fotos, no hace falta que me lo digas!” Lo que podría interpretarse como un estilo frontal y muy temperamental es entonces nada más y nada menos que Roberta Bayley en actitud fiel a su esencia punk, la misma que la llevó a ser una de las pocas protagonistas privilegiadas de la escena de la Gran Manzana que cierta vez llegó para dejar una huella eterna. Allí estuvo esta mujer en primera persona para retratar a través del lente de su cámara todo lo que pudo. Más de cuatro décadas después, a sus 68 años, Bayley, aquella fiel testigo de las andanzas sobre y fuera del escenario de sus protagonistas, aterrizó en Buenos Aires para presentar la exhibición fotográfica personal que muestra buena parte de su obra. Una estadía de una semana íntegra, de jueves a jueves, en la que fue exhaustivamente entrevistada, y durante la cual apenas tuvo tiempo para salir a recorrer la ciudad, que dice, por lo que vio hasta ahora, le recuerda a París. Y sobre la que confiesa fue tan bien recibida, que le gustaría volver en cualquier momento. A Bayley le gusta hablar mucho, y pasionalmente, tanto que suele terminar adelantándose a las preguntas de quienes la reportean. A lo que agrega un detalle que la emociona: el de que no la indaguen directamente sobre la foto de la portada del primer álbum de los Ramones (que si bien es su principal marca registrada, le hace poca justicia al resto de su carrera), que decide agradecer a través de un gesto singular cuando le avisan que es hora de ir concluyendo la entrevista: “No, todavía no, quiero seguir hablando”,  y al que a sus entrevistadores no le quedó más opción que aceptar.

Capture

Testigo de una era: Bayley y cámara en los ’70

Ud. nació en Pasadena, California, ¿pero qué es lo que exactamente la llevó a trasladarse a vivir a Londres, y luego a la ciudad de New York?
Bueno, me fui del sur de California cuando tenía 4 años. Le pedí a mi madre que no me llevé allí, pero me dijo “nos vamos”. Así que nos mudamos a Seattle, donde viví hasta los 7, y después volvimos a mudarnos, a Marin County, al norte de San Francisco, un área muy agradable. Ahora es un vecindario muy adinerado, pero por entonces era clase media. Con mucha naturaleza. Teníamos una casa en la colina con una gran vista, sabés, y caballos y mascotas. Más tarde, una vez que me gradué en la secundaria a los 18 años, fui a la universidad en San Francisco. Desafortunadamente mi hermana se mató en un accidente automovilístico en ese mismo año, lo que fue muy perturbador. Cuando tenía 19, tuve un novio que era músico, y nos fuimos a vivir juntos por cerca de 1 año. Aún es muy buen amigo mío. Y luego de mi tercer año en la universidad, la abandoné sin pensarlo demasiado. Y entonces me dije “me voy a Londres”. Me compré un pasaje de ida. El motivo principal fue que quería estar lejos, y aparte allí hablaban el mismo idioma que yo, si bien era con un acento peculiar, pero como fuera, ahí se hablaba inglés. De todas formas yo siempre había sido bastante anglófila, porque era fanática de los Beatles y de los Rolling Stones, y de todo eso, por lo que tenía una afinidad por Londres. Y además yo tenía un amigo de San Francisco que también era fotógrafo, y que se había mudado allí. No éramos amigos íntimos pero nos conocíamos, y me ayudó con lo de la fotografía, ya que intentaba aprender sobre eso. Eso fue en 1970 o 1971, creo. Fred vivía en un departamento muy grande por el cual no pagaba nada, y me dijo “sobra lugar, ¿por qué no venís?” Así que comencé a vivir ahí, me busqué un empleo y me puse a trabajar. No tenía cámara, no me dedicaba a sacar fotos, ni nada semejante. Fuera de eso, estaba muy metida en la escena de la música. Estaban los grandes periódicos musicales como el Melody Maker o el New Musical Express, y ocasionalmente iba a ver conciertos. Ahí fue cuando vi a los Temptations, o a Al Green, en 1973. Yo era muy fan de él. Con todo ese traje blanco que se ponía, y tocó en el Rainbow. Y después cuando fue a New York fui a verlo al Apollo, lo que fue alucinante, ya que era un show distinto. Era realmente sexy, y sucio, y cool. Pero volviendo a Londres, trabajé brevemente con Malcolm McLaren. Yo vivía en el mismo barrio que él, y solía venir junto a su mujer al restaurante en el que yo trabajaba de moza. A veces necesitaba alguien que lo ayude, pero no era nada que tenga que ver con la música. Aunque de vez en cuando íbamos a ver bandas juntos, y entre todo eso había un grupo del que comenzaba a hablarse mucho llamado Kilburn and the High-Roads. Es como que eran parte de la escena del pub rock, y al mismo tiempo los domingos había un programa de radio que se llamaba Honky Tonk, conducido por un tipo caballero llamado Charlie Gillett. Fue quien escribió “Sound of the City”, uno de los primeros libros de rock que se hicieron. Me hice amiga de Charlie, y él empezó a manejar a Kilburn and the High-Roads. Y la vez en que tocaron en White Chapel, conocí a Ian Dury, con quien nos enamoramos locamente, y nos volvimos haciendo dedo a la ciudad. Pero sucedió que yo me estaba volviendo a San Francisco, como lo había planeado. Hubo un montón de correspondencia entre nosotros, y llamadas de teléfono. Ian me suplicaba que regrese a Londres.

¿Y entonces volvió a Londres?
Sí, nos amábamos, así que volví. Y nos fuimos a vivir juntos. La banda estaba peleándola fuerte, pero no ganábamos dinero. Vivíamos en un squat en Stockwell, cerca de Brixton. Pero hacían una música genial. Los Kilburns eran realmente una banda muy extraña. Digo, tenían un tipo negro que era lisiado, otro que era enano, y además a un tipo llamado Humphrey Ocean… Usaba un nombre falso, pero era pintor artístico. No era músico, realmente, más que nada se ponía a bailar en el escenario. Pero eran muy buenos, y las canciones eran muy originales. Ian era un performer increíble, y además increíblemente carismático. Y también era lisiado. Había tenido poliomielitis, y terminó con una de las piernas completamente jodida. Pero era completamente único. Finalmente consiguieron un contrato discográfico e hicieron un álbum, pero no anduvo bien, así que Ian me dijo “soy demasiado pobre, deberías volver a los Estados Unidos, la situación no es buena”. Pienso que además seguía teniendo una aventura con su novia anterior a mí, Denise Roudette, que también hacía música, y que era una mujer muy hermosa.
03
Lo que para Ud. habrá significado otra verdadera buena razón para volver a casa.
Bueno, lo desconocía, pero lo sospechaba, y no quería tener un novio que me engañase. Y ya sabés cómo es, “tenés que odiar a la novia”, y ella me odiaba. Y una vez que me fui, se llevó mi tapado de piel. Pero es una mujer espiritualmente bellísima, y tengo gran respeto por ella. Creo que en cierto momento también formó parte de los Kilburns. Así que me fui a New York.  No conocía absolutamente a nadie allí. Tenía un amigo al que recordaba vagamente, y que se había mudado de San Francisco, pero al mismo tiempo tenía una lista de nombres que me habían dado mis amigos de Londres, tipo “soy amiga de Ian Dury”, y entre ellos hubo una mujer que me dijo “sí, venite y viví conmigo”. Tenía un loft muy grande en la calle Church. Esto fue en 1974. Pero todo el mundo me ayudó muchísimo. Y entonces me puse a trabajar, y gané algo de  dinero.  Mi primer empleo en New York fue como niñera, ya que eso te daba un lugar donde vivir, además de un salario, pero era part-time. Pero también había otro tipo, de los que estaban en la lista de contactos que me habían dado mis amigos, que estaba en el negocio de la música. Era plomo de bandas. Trabajaba en luces y sonido pare los Stones, y para otras bandas grandes. Era muy agradable. Me llevó a pasear por toda New York. Y una vez me dijo, “¿qué es lo que querés hacer?”. Y yo le contesté, “quiero ir a ver a los New York Dolls, porque nunca los vi”. Porque cuando tocaron en San Francisco, yo estaba en Londres. Y cuando tocaron en Londres, yo estaba en San Francisco. Y él se había encargado de hacerles sonido en New York, y los conocía muy bien. Y a la semana siguiente tocaban en un lugar que se llamaba Club 82, que era un club que alguna vez había sido propiedad de la mafia. Todos los que actuaban allí eran imitadores femeninos, lo que ahora se le dice “drag queens”. Esa era la historia del club, pero para cuando yo lo fui a conocer, ya era como una pequeña discoteca. Se había vuelto muy popular porque David Bowie solía ir de visita, y todo el mundo iba ahí por ese motivo. Todos los nuevos grupos tocaban ahí, y por supuesto también los New York Dolls. El lugar también tenía una pista de baile, por lo que todo el mundo podía ponerse a bailar después de ver a las bandas. Así que los Dolls fue la primera banda que vi en New York, y después del show mi amigo organizó una fiesta para los grupos en su loft, que estaba encima del club, a la que vinieron algunos de los miembros de los Dolls, y también los teloneros, un grupo llamado The Miamis, que si bien eran desconocidos, eran de mis favoritos por entonces.

02Sí, hace 2 años hicimos una entrevista con Gary Lachman (N. Valentine, el bajista original de Blondie) en Londres, y él mencionó a los Miamis.
Sí, eran de mis preferidos. Tenían cero imagen, eran solo un grupo de chicos judíos con el pelo enrulado. No tenían un look punk. Eran más pop que punk, pero eran muy buenos compositores de canciones, y tipos muy divertidos. Sus canciones tenían mucho sentido del humor, pero nunca fueron exitosos. En esa fiesta conocí a David Johansen (N. el vocalista de los New York Dolls), que estuvo muy simpático. Pero lo más gracioso fue que los Dolls nunca habían tocado antes ahí, y entonces dijeron “bueno, vamos a tocar en el Club 82, deberíamos ponernos vestidos de mujer”. Yo ya había escuchado los rumores sobre los maricas y todo eso, y entonces, en esa primera vez, David usó un vestido femenino de noche sin sujetadores, una peluca de mujer, y tacos altos, y yo me dije “oh, estos tipos son extraños”. Pero era lo que hacían, era una especie de broma. Creo que Johnny (Thunders) o Jerry (Nolan) dijeron “oh no, no pienso ponerme un vestido”. Porque eran realmente muy machos, no tenían nada de gay, sabés. La industria musical les tenía cierto miedo, por la tapa de su disco, en la que se los veía vestidos de mujer, y la gente no lo entendía. Había mucha homofobia, y demás.

Pareciera ser que ver a los Dolls en aquella época representó un antes y un después para todos los que formaban parte de la escena musical de New York de fines de los ’70. ¡Todo el mundo iba a ver a los New York Dolls!
Oh sí, eran muy grandes en New York. Mick Jagger y David Johansen se ponían a hablar en Max’s Kansas City, y la gente prefería prestarle atención a David. Eran más grandes que nada. Eran la banda más cool,  tenían las mejores novias, y nadie se veía tan bien. Más tarde el éxito de los Dolls se vendría a pique, pero todo el mundo podía darse cuenta que realmente la pasaban muy bien. Conseguían a todas las chicas y todas las drogas que querían, era divertido, y de eso se trata el rock and roll, por lo que todos se ponían a formar grupos.

04

Bayley, sobre los New York Dolls: “Eran la banda más cool,  tenían las mejores novias, y nadie se veía tan bien”

Y aparte tenían una gran imagen, algo que seguramente resultaba muy impactante por entonces.
Sí. Y ahí fue cuando Malcolm McLaren se puso a manejarlos. Los vistió con pantalones de cuero rojo, les puso la bandera comunista detrás, y demás. Pero los Dolls hacían shows increíbles, y tenían a bandas como Television de teloneros. Los grupos más nuevos, como Television, querían distinguirse del glitter rock, no iban a ponerse lápiz labial… Y así fue como Richard Hell creó muy específica e intencionalmente ese nuevo look del pelo corto. Nadie tenía el cabello corto. En el rock and roll, tenías que tener el pelo largo. Y usaban prendas rasgadas porque, sabés, se le rompía la ropa, y la arreglaban con alfileres de gancho. No era algo relativo a la moda, era algo práctico con lo cual vivir.

Y no es que tampoco alguien esperase a que se transforme en algo que se ponga de moda.
Bueno, de algún modo Richard pensó que, si querían que le presten atención, tenían que ser diferentes. Richard Hell diseñó esa remera que usaba Richard Lloyd en vivo con la frase “por favor mátenme”. De hecho Richard Lloyd intentó oxigenarse el pelo, pero lo quedó verde… (Risas)

05

Richard Hell, pionero del punk: “Estaba muy metido en el surrealismo”

¿Cómo era convivir con Richard Hell?
¿Con Richard? Extraño. No me dejaba regar las plantas de la casa, me decía “dejá que se muera, es supervivencia, no riegues las plantas”. Y también había un ratón en el departamento que yo quería sacarme de encima, pero él me decía “¡No! ¡El ratón vive!”

¿A qué se refiere? ¿Un ratón que vivía con Uds.? ¿En una pecera, o estaba suelto?
No, andaba suelto. Entonces lo maté, y lo tiré a la basura, y Richard me dijo “oh, ¿dónde está el ratón?” Nunca le dije que lo había matado. Vivíamos juntos, y así era las cosas. Éramos pobres, sabés. No era malo, ni agresivo. Richard estaba muy metido en el  surrealismo, gente como Lautreaumont o Baudelaire. Ahora es escritor, y por entonces ya era poeta.

Intentamos contactarlo recientemente para entrevistarlo.
No, él no habla de música, no quiere hacerlo. Es casi imposible lograr que hable de música. Y eso es algo que respeto porque, digámoslo así, yo siempre estoy haciendo todas estas entrevistas en las que siempre se me pregunta lo mismo, una y otra vez. “¿Cómo eran los años ’70?”, etc. Para él eso es algo extremadamente aburrido. No hizo nada de música desde los años ’80. Ahora es escritor. Publicó novelas, libros, artículos… Vive de ser un escritor respetado. Y entonces no quiere hablar sobre el punk rock. Lo entiendo completamente.

No es algo tan difícil de entender…
Mirá, antes de venir para Buenos Aires, hubo alguien que me entrevistó sobre Sid (Vicious) y Nancy (Spungen), ya que conocí a ambos. Y la primera pregunta fue, “¿Cómo fueron los años ’70?”. Y entonces le dije, “mirá, no voy a escribir esta nota para vos. Hay muchos libros y artículos escritos sobre eso. Vas a la biblioteca, y en 2 semanas me volvés a llamar y entonces me hacés alguna pregunta seria, porque no puedo relatarte la historia completa. ¡Ese es tu trabajo, el periodista sos vos!”. Esa era la filosofía de Richard, y lo comprendo. Cinco años atrás probablemente haya contestado a ese tipo de preguntas, pero ahora es como demasiado. Andá a la biblioteca, fijate en internet, está todo ahí. Y así me podés formular una pregunta relevante que muestre que tenés algo de conocimiento, y entonces no me vas a insultar. (Risas)

sidney-with-vicious

Bayley junto a Sid Vicious.

Espero que nuestras preguntas le resulten interesantes…
Sí, lo son, un poco suenan a que ya conocías cuáles iban a ser mis respuestas. Disfruto de las entrevistas, pero a veces te cansás de escuchar “¿Cómo fue el día en que sacó la foto de los Ramones?”

Volviendo atrás, ¿cómo fue que obtuvo el puesto en el CBGB’s?
Oh, eso fue porque yo era la novia de Richard Hell. Television era la única banda que solía tocar allí los domingos a la noche. Su manager, Terry Ork, un día me dijo “Roberta, quedate en la puerta y recaudá la plata, 2 dólares”. Y entonces cuando la gente entraba, les decía que tenían que pagar y que eran 2 dólares, que iban a ver una buena banda, y así era la negociación.

Hay una historia muy divertida respecto a eso con Legs McNeil.
Sí, vino al CBGB’s y me dijo “Soy Legs McNeil” (N. uno de los fundadores de la revista). Yo nunca había visto a la revista Punk, nadie la conocía. Era algo nuevo, acababa de salir el primer número. Y yo le dije “No, son 2 dólares, me tenés que pagar”. Y él me dijo, “No, entro gratis”. Y después yo le dije, “Bueno, ok, dame una copia de la revista”. Y Legs me dijo, “No, cuesta 50 centavos, detrás de la barra, ahñi podés comprarla”. Así que yo le dije, “Está bien, entrá sin pagar”. Así que fui hasta el bar, agarré 50 centavos, y compré la revista. Después del trabajo, fui a casa, leí la revista, y me dije, “Tengo que trabajar con estos tipos, ¡es increíble!”. No estaban seguros de mí. Pero entonces decidimos hacer algo juntos, que era como una fotonovela. Eso significó ir a diferentes clubs, y yo sacaba las fotos. Hicimos todas esas fotos y hubo muy buena química entre nosotros, y fue un momento muy divertido, nos divertimos mucho. Y entonces ellos me dijeron, “Bueno, ¿querés trabajar con nosotros?” Y de ahí en adelante, trabajé con ellos hasta el final de la revista.

¿Ya estaba trabajando de fotógrafa? ¿Qué la llevó a convertirse en fotógrafa antes de entrar en la escena musical?
Sí, eso pasó en 1976, y yo había empezado a fines de 1975. Me interesó la fotografía desde que era una nena. Tenía una cámara de juguete. Pero de repente la fotografía comenzó a hacerse popular entre la gente. Y cuando estuve en la secundaria, cuando tenía 15 años, tuve una clase de fotografía, que fue muy simple. Pero aprendí a revelar un rollo, y a cómo imprimir. Yo amaba la fotografía, y cuando me dieron el boletín con las notas, la mayoría fueron buenas calificaciones. A mi profesor de fotografía le gustaban mucho mis fotos, y me encargaba tareas, como la de tomar imágenes que tengan movimiento. Era profesor de historia, pero su pasión era la fotografía. Y entonces, cuando cumplí 19, me compré una cámara Nikon. En ese momento no sacaba fotos de música, pero hacía tomas callejeras. Por entonces la fotografía no era aún considerada una forma de arte, todavía era la oveja negra del mundo del arte. Pero entonces me fui a New York y conocí a todos los que estaban en la escena, como dije. El Club 82. Y yo trabajaba en el CBGB’s. Todo el mundo resultaba muy interesante, por lo que hubiera sido muy estúpido no hacer fotos.

¿Alguna razón en especial por la que la mayoría de sus fotos eran en blanco y negro?
Sí, fue algo decidido, porque no tenía dinero. Pero hice muchas fotos en color, siempre y cuando podía afrontar el gasto, o bien hacía ambas. Y especialmente cuando empecé a trabajar para Blondie. Pero el color es más caro. Aparte fui extremadamente afortunada de que poco después que me compré la cámara, un amigo me dijo, “tengo una cámara oscura que alguien dejó en mi departamento, te voy a dejar usarla por 6 meses”. ¡La cámara oscura entera, que era muy grande, con todo lo que necesitaba!

07

Pretty baby: Debbie Harry retratada por el lente de Roberta Bayley

Trabajó mucho junto a Blondie, que de todos modos eran un grupo muy colorido. Hubiera sido una gran pérdida haber fotografiado a Debbie Harry solamente en blanco y negro…
Sí, y fue lo mismo con los New York Dolls. Y pienso al respecto, porque siempre le digo a la gente que parte de la razón por la que la tapa de los Ramones (N. la del álbum debut) causó tanta impresión es porque fue en blanco y negro, pero también hay una tapa de New York Dolls que fue en black and white. Era inusual para las bandas de rock. La música folk tuvo muchas imágenes en blanco y negro, Bob Dylan también. Pero las bandas de rock usualmente usaban color. Elvis fue en blanco y negro, su primer álbum para RCA, el que The Clash copió. Yo hacía las dos cosas, tenía dos cámaras para poder tomar fotos en color y en blanco y negro. Pero la imagen de Ramones era en blanco y negro, ya que  era para la revista Punk. No podíamos permitirnos imprimir en color. La impresión era tan primitiva que no se podía mezclar el color y el blanco y negro en la misma página, lo cual ahora es muy común. Entonces, todo lo que fotografiaba para la revista Punk era en blanco y negro. Estúpidamente, Bob Gruen estuvo allí uno de los días en que hice fotos para Debbie, así que tiene las fotos de ella en color ya que él era rico y podía permitírselo (Risas). Quiero decir, él no era rico, pero era más rico que yo.

1

Una que sepamos todos: así retrató Bayley a los Ramones para la portada de su álbum debut.

¿Cuál o cuáles diría fueron los artistas más fáciles y los más difíciles con los que trabajó? Sé que amaba fotografiar a Iggy Pop. De hecho una vez declaró que deseó haberlo fotografiado mucho más.
Oh sí, es correcto. Y después me retiré. Pero siempre puedo llamarlo por teléfono (Risas). Hay una muy buena entrevista de él hecha por Anthony Bourdain, seguro que la podés encontrar en YouTube. Iggy es la persona más copada que existe, y esa conversación tuvo lugar en su casa en Florida.

Volviendo a la escena del punk, le voy a hacer una pregunta con truco. ¿Cuál de las 08dos escenas influenció a la otra? ¿La neoyorquina influyó a la inglesa, o cree que fue al revés?
¡Ahora me estás demostrando que sos ignorante! Perdón.

No hay problema.
La escena de New York comenzó en 1974. Y la de Londres en 1976. ¿Entonces quién influyó a quién? ¡Fue la de New York! Londres tomó todas las ideas de la neoyorquina. Los alfileres de gancho, las vestimentas rasgadas, y todo eso. Pero localmente, los ingleses fueron muy talentosos. Ya sabés, Glen Matlock, Steve Jones, Paul Cook

La pregunta que le hice no era en serio. Quise jugar un poco…
Pero es algo que no me creerías…Cuando hablo con periodistas estúpidos, siempre les digo “¡Andate, encargate de revisar la historia!”. Lo empezamos nosotros.

Entonces la pregunta indicada sería, ¿existe un enlace entre ambas escenas?
¡Por supuesto! ¡Malcolm McLaren! Ya sabés cómo fue, Blondie primero se hizo muy grande en Inglaterra, antes que en cualquier otro lugar, porque Debbie era muy hermosa, y se presentaron en Top of the Pops…Blondie tuvo muchos hits en Londres. Pero para cuando retornaron a New York, ya sabían que Johnny Rottten había copiado a Richard Hell, que era la versión de él. Johnny Rotten lo copió.

De algún modo la mayoría de la gente siempre creyó que lo del punk empezó con los Sex Pistols.
No hace falta que me lo expliques, soy yo quien te lo explico a vos, ¿ok? Es así como funciona.

09

Roberta Bayley y una de sus fotos de los Sex Pistols : “Los Pistols nunca fueron grandes en USA”

De acuerdo…
Los Sex Pistols se volvieron grandes en Londres porque dijeron “fuck” en TV. Ya sabés, su disco fue prohibido. Ni siquiera se permitía promoverlo, pero podías venderlo. Y entonces eran muy difundidos por la prensa. Por aquel entonces nadie conocía a los grupos de New York, excepto algunas personas.  Los Ramones eran todavía bastante oscuros, pero cuando fueron a Londres y tocaron en el Roundhouse el 4 de julio de 1976, en la audiencia estaban los Clash, los Pistols, etc. Ninguno de ellos tenía plata para las entradas, y Johnny Ramone se acercó a la ventanilla y los hizo pasar. Eran apenas chicos, pero los Ramones estaban muy al tanto de los fans, y de que iban a ser la futura nueva música. No creo que los Ramones se hayan sentido amenazados, pero pienso que se enojaron mucho cuando los Sex Pistols terminaron volviéndose más famosos que ellos más rápidamente. Pero, a decir verdad, no en los Estados Unidos. Los Sex Pistols nunca fueron grandes en USA. Pero Inglaterra es un país muy pequeño, y tenía tres periódicos musicales. Era un ambiente completamente distinto.

Y después ocurrió exactamente de la manera contraria cuando los Pistols hicieron su última gira en los EE.UU. ¿Qué nos puede decir de esa experiencia?
Eso fue realmente algo insano. Ya estaban hartos de todo, y Sid se estaba desintoxicando de la heroína. Como adicto a las drogas, se sentía pésimamente mal. Tuvimos esa idea de tocar en ciudades extrañas, ciudades oscuras en el sur como Memphis, Baton Rouge, San Antonio…Pero todo eso fue intencional.

No diría arriesgados, pero definitivamente eran lugares muy duros. La gente les arrojaba botellas…
Bueno, éramos punks, y nos la bancábamos… (Risas) Pero eso fue parte de todo lo que resultó frustrante para la banda, porque el grupo era realmente bueno. Me perdí los dos primeros shows del tour. Mi primer concierto de la gira fue el de San Antonio, donde la gente le tiraba todo tipo de cosas, y los insultaba. “Fuck you!”, y demás. Los trataban como si fueran freaks. Pero también había gente a los que les gustaban, si bien eran una minoría. Ya sabés, cuando vas al sur, Tulsa, Oklahoma…están todos esos tipos que son fanáticos de Jesús, que protestan, está eso de la “música del diablo”, y toda esa mierda. Así que los Pistols estaban frustrados y hartos de todo, y entonces Johnny dijo “suficiente”. Eso ocurrió en San Francisco.

¿Por qué cree que el interés en el punk se mantiene tan vigente después de todos estos años?
Es la última música underground. Ya no hay manera de ser así, te descubren inmediatamente. Te descubren antes de cualquier cosa, aún antes de que vayas al estudio y te pongas a tocar. Esa es mi opinión. Ya no sigo a la música. Fue como pasó en los años ’50, que fue la verdadera música punk, con gente como Little Richard. Nadie más punk. Elvis Presley. Nadie más punk. La gente dice, “oh, el punk fue la música más revolucionaria”. Oh no, eso fue el rock´n´roll de los ’50, y aún más, la música negra de esos tiempos. Y después de eso, los grupos de mediados de los años ’60, y también los grupos psicodélicos, que eran un tipo de música diferente.

IMG_3310De sólo ponerse a pensar en que Little Richard era negro, gay, que usaba lápiz de labios, y que movía el culo cuando tocaba el piano, ¡y en los años ’50!
Sí, y fue la mayor influencia de David Bowie, y también la primera. Pude escuchar a Little Richard porque mi hermana era 7 años mayor que yo. Aún siendo tan chica, escuché ‘Tutti Frutti’. Amaba a Little Richard. Y a Jerry Lee Lewis, otro punk.

¿Qué opina sobre la cultura neoyorquina? ¿Cree que hubo cambios importantes en los últimos años?
New York siempre será un centro cultural. Hoy en día se le hace muy difícil a los artistas vivir allí por su alto costo de vida. En los ’70 podías conseguir un loft, uno grande, por 200 dólares al mes.  Ahora eso cuesta 10.000. Para los más jóvenes que vienen a vivir a la ciudad, no sé cómo hacen.

Creo que es lo mismo que siempre ocurrió con las áreas más bohemias de las grandes ciudades. Como el barrio de Chelsea, en Londres. En los ’60 eran lugares en los que se podía vivir, y de repente llegaron las grandes compañías, o las grandes marcas de ropa, pusieron oficinas o locales, y se volvieron lugares carísimos y de moda.
Oh sí, igual que con el Soho de New York. Porque en ese entonces era un lugar muerto. Lo mismo pasó en Tribecca. Cualquier barrio que menciones. Probablemente sólo el Bronx sea todavía un lugar duro. Mi vecindario está demasiado habitado. Solía ser más sereno. Pero nunca salgo de noche, me importa un carajo.

10¿Cuánto hace que vive en el mismo sitio?
Casi 45 años, desde 1970. Es un departamento pequeño de 120 metros cuadrados. El edificio tiene siete pisos, y no hay ascensor. Así que cada día subo y los bajo, no tengo más remedio. Es eso, o dormir en el piso. No es ningún problema para mí, hace mucho que lo hago. Es algo muy saludable. Y algo más, en New York es ilegal tener siete pisos sin ascensor, los edificios tienen no más de seis. Por lo que tengo una vista increíble, y una luz hermosa, ya que no hay edificios cerca del mío. Eso es lo que me digo cada día cuando subo las escaleras, “¡tenés buena luz!” (Risas)

Respecto a  su muestra de fotos, ¿se siente como una artista mostrando sus trabajos, o más como testigo de una era? ¿Ya había visitado Buenos Aires?
Oh, ambas. No vi casi nada de aquí, excepto la galería, la galería, el hotel, la galería, el hotel, la galería … Pero lo voy a hacer. Me gustaría volver.

¿No se siente un poco rara viniendo hasta aquí para exhibir sus fotos?
¡Me siento maravillosa! No me siento rara. Es una sensación fantástica, estoy muy a gusto, es muy excitante. Siento un poco de eso en New York, y también cuando estuve en Tokyo. Viste cómo es, también son grandes fans de los Ramones y del punk rock. Ahí fue como si fuera una mini-celebridad, pero no tanto como aquí. No es algo que quiera hacer todos los días de mi vida, perdería la cabeza.

Entonces ésta es su primera vez aquí, ¿pero también la primera en Sudamérica? ¿Ni siquiera estuvo en Brasil?
Sí. Ni siquiera en Brasil.  Mi primera vez debajo del Ecuador.

¿Cuál cree que es el legado más grande del punk para el mundo?
Es la idea de “hacelo vos mismo”. No esperes a convertirte en un experto. Intentalo, equivocate, está todo bien. Si sentís ganas de hacer algo, no te sientes en tu cuarto a practicar guitarra durante 5 años, salí y tocá con tres cuerdas. Es todo lo que necesitás. Hacelo. Porque eso es lo que hicimos nosotros. Yo no sabía cómo hacer fotografías.

Una última pregunta, teniendo en cuenta que Ud. apareció en fotos recientes junto a su perro. Es como si de repente haya cambiado las fotos con punks a fotos con “pugs”.
Sí, los perros y los músicos no son nada diferentes.

CON DREGEN DE BACKYARD BABIES ANTES DE SU VISITA: “LA MÚSICA BASADA EN GUITARRAS HABLA DE TEMAS MÁS REALES”

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 9 de marzo de 2018

Marzo nos trae aparejado no sólo el comienzo del otoño local, sino también la muy interesante primera visita al país de los venerados Backyard Babies. Para recorrer la historia de una de las bandas más emblemáticas de la escena escandinava de los últimos años ante todo hay que primero viajar en el tiempo unos 31 años atrás a la ciudad sueca de Nässjö, en el condado de Jönköping, a poco más de 300 km. de Estocolmo. Fue ahí que en 1987 el guitarrista Dregen, más sus compañeros Tobbe (Tobias Fischer, bajo y voz), el segundo guitarrista Johan Blomqvist y el baterista Peder Carlsson dieron forma al proyecto que, por entonces bajo el nombre de Tyrant, comenzaba a dar los primeros pasos en la escena de un país históricamente dominado por el pop.

Tobbe se alejaría del proyecto algo después para ser reemplazado por el guitarrista Nicke Borg, situación que obligó a Blomqvist a cambiar su instrumento original por el bajo. Así llegaría 1989, y con el nuevo nombre de Backyard Babies, el grupo pondría en marcha su primera gira a lo largo y ancho de su tierra natal, coronada por el lanzamiento de su EP inicial con 5 canciones “Something To Swallow” en 1993, al que se agregaría su primer álbum de estudio “Diesel & Power” al año siguiente, por entonces su mejor tarjeta de presentación del hard rock y punk que los caracterizaba. Los Babies pasarían por un primer receso en 1995. Fue cuando Dregen decidió en forma paralela darle curso a The Hellacopters, dejando de lado el estilo musical del cuarteto para volcarse a un sonido de orden más garage. Dregen retomaría el proyecto de su combo original a partir de 1997 y, con el correr del tiempo, lograr exitosamente establecer a los Backyard Babies como una de las propuestas más originales salidas de las esferas nórdicas, editando hasta la fecha 6 discos más de estudio (desde “Total 13” en 1998 hasta “Four By Four”, su hasta ahora más reciente trabajo, que viera la luz en 2015)

2BABIES EN ARGENTINA. Así las cosas, y a casi tres décadas de su nacimiento, los Babies cruzarán casi medio globo terráqueo para aterrizar en tierras autóctonas y realizar su primer show en el país el próximo sábado 24 de marzo en el Niceto Club como parte de su South American Tour (y la segunda en Sudamérica, tras haberse presentado en Sao Paulo hace 16 años en plena gira del álbum “Making Enemies Is Good”), el mismo que antes los tendrá pasando por Chile y, tras visitarnos, los llevará de vuelta a Brasil. Para la ocasión y deleite de su base de fans local, el cuarteto sueco no estará solo, ya que el evento, que se auspicia será de rock and roll con todas las de la ley, empezará desde mucho más temprano con las participaciones de los locales TurbocoopersShe-Ra (que siguen presentando su primer larga duración de 2016 “A Más No Poder”, y que ya han sabido ser honorables teloneros del ex L.A. Guns Phil Lewis, o más recientemente de Honest John Plain) y Camus, cuyo set seguramente incluirá material de su disco debut “Mandrágora” y también de “Volumen II”, lanzado hace 2 años.
Mientras tanto, y como para amenizar la espera, nos comunicamos con Dregen desde su Suecia natal para hablar de esto y demás tópicos, y de paso volver a repasar la vida y obra de sus delicadamente ruidosos Backyard Babies a días de su primera llegada al país.

Si uno se fija en la historia del pop y el rock sueco, de cierta forma todo se inició después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial con músicos que estaban esencialmente influenciados por el jazz y el rock que llegaba de los EE.UU. e Inglaterra, algo que también ocurrió en otros países. Pero según leí tuvo un comienzo más importante con la escena de la “dansbandsmusik” (Bandas de música bailable) a principios de los 70, y de la cual saldrían artistas como ABBA. Quisiera saber tu opinión sobre esto, y al mismo tiempo preguntarte si creés que ABBA fue importante a la hora de difundir la música popular de tu país alrededor del mundo.
ABBA fue muy importante al poner a Suecia “en el mapa” como país musical, y también fueron los primeros en tener detrás un gran equipo de marketing y gente que trabajaba mucho manejándolos, una compañía grabadora que vio al mundo entero como mercado, y no solamente Suecia. Fuera de todo eso opino que eran grandes compositores de canciones con melodías muy pegadizas. Pero para bandas como la nuestra, o como los Hellacopters, realmente no significaban nada.

Si bien podría mencionarte varias bandas de rock de Suecia, de cierta forma siempre fui de pensar que, no sólo en tu país, sino también en el resto de Escandinavia, el pop de toda esa región siempre logró mayor impacto que el rock. Pero entonces llegaron los 80, el heavy metal comenzó a dominar al mundo y de alguna manera terminó cambiando la escena del rock. Me refiero a bandas como Europe, que de repente se volvieron muy exitosas, lo que más tarde hizo que aparecieran más grupos suecos de rock más clásico como los Diamond Dogs, de pop/rock como The Hives o, nuevamente, otros más orientados al pop como The Cardigans. Y los Backyard Babies, por supuesto. ¿Estás de acuerdo con eso de que el pop siempre fue más grande que el rock en tu país? Y de ser así, ¿cuál creés que fue el motivo que llevó a que resulte ser así?
En general, la música pop siempre va a tener más éxito ya que fue pensada comercialmente, y apuntada a la “masa general”. El rock, el jazz, el blues, el punk y el metal siempre van a tener algo de underground, ya fuere musicalmente como a nivel letras de canciones. La música basada en guitarras generalmente habla de temas más reales y tiene una chispa más rebelde, tiene más actitud sobre todo. Y no es algo que sea para todo el mundo. Pero después hubo artistas que cambiaron un poco todo eso. Por ejemplo, creo que Amy Winehouse es genial. No deja de ser algo comercial, pero con mucha profundidad en sus letras.

3GUNS SHAKES, HANOI ROCKS
¿Que dirías de Hanoi Rocks? Sin dudas ayudaron a difundir el rock escandinavo por todo el mundo como nadie lo había logrado antes. De hecho siempre fui de pensar que Guns N’Roses les copió muchísimas cosas, y de hecho es algo que hasta terminó convirtiéndose en un tema tabú.
Fuck al tabú de todo eso. Me encanta Guns N’Roses, pero sin Hanoi Rocks ni siquiera hubieran llegado a ser una banda. Al menos no en lo que respecta a la imagen de sus primeros años. Hanoi Rocks tuvo un impacto enorme en los Backyard Babies, y no sólo musicalmente. Por entonces mi colección de discos era 99% artistas de Inglaterra o de EE.UU. y, de repente, cuando aparecieron los Hanoi desde Finlandia, pasaron a convertirse en nuestra “estrella brillante del polo”. Y nosotros nos dijimos, “si ellos pudieron hacerlo, también lo podemos hacer nosotros”.

Sos parte de Backyard Babies desde los primeros días del grupo en 1987, cuando aún tenían el nombre de Tyrant. Teniendo en cuenta que ya pasaron muchísimos años desde que se lanzó el EP inicial “Something To Swallow”, y habiendo editado siete discos de estudio después, más uno en vivo, ¿cuáles pensás que fueron los tiempos más difíciles para la banda? ¿Y cuáles los mejores? ¿Considerarías a los Babies como una banda que tuvo muchos altibajos?
Backyard Babies se estableció en 1989 con la misma formación que sigue teniendo hoy día. Y entre 1989 y 1988 tuvimos que luchar mucho para lograr atención, pero siempre fue algo muy divertido. Desde el 98 en adelante pudimos empezar a vivir de la banda, y de ahí en más todo fue 100% grandes momentos. Después llegaron los problemas con las drogas y el alcohol, demasiado trabajo y giras. Entonces decidimos tomarnos un descanso entre 2010 y 2014, y de ahí en adelante volvió a ser todo grandioso.

4La formación del grupo prácticamente no se modificó nunca. ¿Es que acaso se quieren tanto entre ustedes?
(Risas) Realmente no lo sé, supongo que será así. Es más algo como una mezcla de familia y hermanos con un matrimonio sólido. Aún vivimos juntos, pero dejamos de coger…

Volviendo a lo que comentaste hace un rato, en una entrevista que te hicieron recientemente leí que en 2010 la banda estaba “quemada”. ¿Realmente son de trabajar tanto? Sé que es algo que al menos podría decir sobre vos, ya que nunca fuiste parte exclusiva del grupo, sino que además estuviste en los Wildhearts y, por supuesto, con los Hellacopters. Ya que estamos, ¿todavía estás en contacto con Ginger? (N. El líder de The Wildhearts)
Si querés hacer las cosas a tu manera, siempre es trabajo duro. Es así. Nada viene gratuitamente. Sí, Ginger y yo seguimos en contacto. De hecho toque con él en Londres el 17 de diciembre del año pasado en su “Birthday Bash” en un lugar llamado The Garage.

5LOS BEBÉS SIGUEN CRECIENDO
Ya pasaron casi 3 años desde que editaron “Four By Four”, su hasta ahora último disco. ¿Ahora qué viene? ¿Tienen nuevos planes, más allá de seguir de gira?
Sí, vamos a entrar en estudios la semana que viene para grabar un nuevo álbum. Esta vez pensamos hacerlo “parte por parte”, no más de 3 o 5 canciones en cada sesión. Entonces habrá un nuevo single de los Backyard Babies hacia mediados de año, antes del verano europeo, y tenemos la esperanza de que el disco salga antes de fin de año, o a principios del 2019. También va a haber nueva música de los Hellacopters.

No puedo dejar de hacerte la bendita pregunta sobre tus artistas favoritos, ya sean de rock o de otros estilos. ¿Solés tener los mismos gustos musicales que el resto de los Babies?
Cuando se trata de rock o punk, compartimos los mismos gustos. Pero yo soy el único que tiene muchísimos discos de blues, y también algunos de hip-hop. Y Nicke escucha mucha música country.

Estuve en el show de los Stones en Estocolmo en octubre del año pasado, con los Hellacopters de soportes. Creo que hicieron un gran concierto, al menos todo el mundo parecía haberlo disfrutado mucho. ¿Cómo fue la experiencia de abrir para los Stones?
Un sueño de niño que se hizo realidad, y en cada forma posible. Pude conocer a los Stones, y fueron seres humanos increíbles.

Una última pregunta, Dregen. Han pasado 18 años desde que estuvieron por primera vez en Sudamérica, pero en aquella ocasión tocaron únicamente en Brasil. Y después sí estuviste vos en Argentina, pero como miembro de la banda de Michael Monroe. ¿Cuáles son tus expectativas para este primer show de los Backyard Babies en el país?
La primera vez siempre es algo especial. ¡Así que sé que va a ser especial! Tenemos admiradores en Argentina desde hace más de 20 años, y estoy verdaderamente maravillado y agradecido de que hayan sido tan pacientes esperando para que toquemos allí después de todos estos años. ¡Va a ser un auténtico estallido!

INCONSCIENTE COMPOSITIVO: LA HISTORIA DETRÁS DE LA CÉLEBRE “NO WOMAN NO CRY”, DE BOB MARLEY

Estándar

ONE LOVE, ONE SONG. Corría octubre de 1974 y los Wailers avanzaban paso a paso firmemente en el terreno que, tras atravesar una década completa portando el estandarte de su distintivo estilo artístico, los llevaría a convertirse en embajadores mundiales del género musical más representativo y popular de su tierra de origen. Por entonces Jamaica estaba gobernada por el primer ministro Michael Norman Manley, un social-demócrata que seguiría al frente de la administración del país hasta 1980 y que también enarbolaba otra bandera, la de los asuntos relativos a la de los países del Tercer Mundo, los comprendidos por las colonias asiáticas y latinoamericanas, aquellos que no formaban parte del Primero (los desarrollados y mayormente capitalistas, con los Estados Unidos a la cabeza), ni tampoco los del llamado Segundo Mundo, o las naciones comunistas capitaneadas por la vieja Unión Soviética.

1LOS WAILERS CON BOB AL FRENTE. Fue en ese contexto que el combo jamaiquino, por entonces ya rebautizado Bob Marley And The Wailers (luego de varios cambios de nombre registrados anteriormente desde The Teenagers, The Wailing Rudeboys o The Wailing Wailers, y dejando en claro quién terminaría siendo su líder definitivo), lanzó al mercado su álbum “Natty Dread”, el séptimo en su carrera y el primero sin los miembros originales Peter Tosh y Bunny Wailer. Aquel disco incluía una de las más bellas canciones alguna vez compuestas, que bajo el título de “No Woman, No Cry” no lograría obtener su mayor éxito o difusión con la versión original de estudio sino gracias a la toma en vivo incluida en “Live!”, el álbum en vivo de 1975 registrado en el Lyceum de Londres, y cuyo reconocimiento público (desde su edición, y hasta estos días) parece haber dejado atrás a la original para siempre. 2
Aquel show se realizó en una calurosa noche de julio y tuvo gran repercusión, algo alentador para el grupo tras el fracaso de su gira previa, donde el público fuera de Jamaica no apreció su reggae puro. Para este tour Marley pulió y ajustó su sonido con el fin de competir con los grupos populares en ese momento, y obtuvo una gran respuesta. Las excelentes críticas dieron lugar a shows agotados en los EE.UU., y para cuando la gira llegó a Londres, fueron un gran éxito.
Marley desarrolló una poderosa presencia escénica en esta gira y agregó músicos como Family Man Barrett y Al Anderson para endulzar un poco el sonido. Las audiencias de esta gira donde se grabó la versión en vivo incluyeron gente blanca y negra en proporciones similares: de hecho, Marley fue uno de los pocos artistas que tuvo un atractivo masivo que trascendió a la cuestión racial. Volviendo a “No Woman…”, la canción se convirtió casi enseguida en un punto culminante de los conciertos de Marley, ya que la multitud invariablemente se unía al coro.

1LÁGRIMAS Y SIGNIFICADOS. Contrariamente a la suposición habitual que indicaba que la letra de la canción aludía a la superación de la pérdida de una mujer, lo que Marley quiso retratar, en rigor, son los sentimientos de alguien al momento de decirle a esa chica que pare de llorar, asegurándole su propio regreso. De hecho, en su versión básica, la cantó de manera diferente a le que luego formó parte de “Live!”, usando la frase “no woman, nuh cry”, lo que en lenguaje patois (o el dialecto insigne más usado en Jamaica), “nuh” significa “don’t”, por lo que en su traducción directa “nuh cry” alude a “no llores”, un mensaje que habría estado dirigido a su esposa Rita. Una segunda interpretación de los hechos alude a un mensaje a todas las madres, esposas y hermanas que sufren las penas que en los hombres les generan.
En cuanto a la versión de este tema incluida en “Natty Dread”, no tiene mucho en común con la que se grabó en el Lyceum londinense; originalmente era más breve y acelerada, sin reflejar la energía que Marley le sumaba al tocarla en vivo. Los coros estuvieron a cargo del grupo femenino I-Threes, compuesto por Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths (que luego cantó el tema “Electric Boogie”, futuro hit disco en EE.UU.) y la esposa de Bob, Rita Marley.

Vincent “Tartar” Ford, el gran amigo de Bob

CON UNA PEQUEÑA AYUDITA PARA MIS AMIGOS. Si bien fue Marley quien se encargó de la melodía, los créditos del disco citan a Vincent “Tartar” Ford como su autor inicial, situación que ha originado más de un debate sobre su origen. Ford fue uno de los más grandes amigos de Marley desde sus días de infancia en el ghetto de Trench Town de la ciudad de Kingston (fase mencionada en la letra de la canción) donde el músico vivió a fines de la década del 50, y con cinco años más de edad, lo llevó a dar sus primeros pasos en la guitarra, asimismo permitiéndole al futuro profeta del reggae y a sus músicos practicar dentro de la tienda de sopas de la cual estaba a cargo. “Vincent y yo acostumbrábamos a cantar juntos hace mucho tiempo”, señalaría Marley posteriormente. “Prácticamente vivíamos en esa cocina”.
Al darle crédito compositivo a Ford (quien falleciera a los 68 años en 2009, a causa de su diabetes), Marley ayudó a un viejo amigo al cederle parte de las regalías, para que pudiera mantenerse y mantener abierto al salón de sopas. Esta fue una práctica común en la producción posterior de Marley, ya que anotaba a varios amigos y miembros de la banda como compositores, debido a que los contratos poco claros le habrían dificultado cobrar sus propias regalías. Consecutivamente, Ford también sería incorporado a los créditos como compositor de tres de las canciones de “Rastaman Vibration”, el disco de 1976 que sucedió a “Natty…”, y junto a quien Marley forjó en letra y música a la más aclamada y gloriosa de las canciones de reggae alguna vez grabadas.

ANÉCDOTAS, HECHOS Y RECUERDOS: 10 DATOS ANTOLÓGICOS SOBRE “FAST” EDDIE CLARKE

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 14 de enero de 2018

1Como parte de la formación de Motörhead que registró acaso sus tres discos más clásicos, y por ende convirtiéndola en su columna históricamente más tradicional, “Fast” Eddie Clarke no precisa de ninguna presentación. El que hasta hace días era el único sobreviviente de “Los Tres Amigos” tras las muertes de Phil “Philthy Animal” Taylor y Ian Fraser “Lemmy” Kilmister a fines de 2015 (y el cuarto Motörhead en morir tras el deceso de Michael “Würzel” Burston en 2011) falleció el último miércoles a los 67 años de edad tras luchar con una fuerte neumonía en un hospital londinense, se supone, producto de un enfisema que venía poniendo en jaque su salud desde hacía un buen tiempo. Edward Allan Clarke se había unido al grupo en 1976, luego de que Taylor se lo presentara a Lemmy a través de un amigo en común, donde permaneció por seis años para luego abandonar la banda y, dejando lado los riffs más pesados atrás, darles un toque más moderno y más fiel al sonido que dominaba la década del ’80, con su nuevo proyecto proyecto Fastway… Más que vasto podría resultar el tendal de historias y anécdotas sobre uno de los guitarristas más “de culto” de la historia del rock, pero mientras tanto nos proponemos recordar a Clarke con algunos de los datos más simbólicos que dejó a lo largo de su existencia.

2

Zeus en pleno, con un Clarke bien pibe ahí nomás, a la derecha

10. ANTES DE MOTÖRHEAD, TOCÓ CON CURTIS KNIGHT Y VARIAS BANDAS MÁS
Para todos aquellos que asocien la carrera de Eddie Clarke exclusivamente con Motörhead, nunca es tarde para enterarse que antes de unirse al trío (y luego de varios intentos fallidos adolescentes en bandas que no pasaron a mayores, como The Bitter End) fue parte de Zeus, el proyecto paralelo de blues/rock progresivo del músico estadounidense de rhythm and blues Curtis Knight, más recordado por su asociación con Jimi Hendrix, a quien tuvo como sesionista en canciones que grabó a mediados de los ’60, hoy disponibles en decenas de discos del músico de Seattle editados post-mortem. Una vez fallecido Hendrix, a comienzos de los ’70 Knight se mudó a Londres en busca de nuevos aires, lo que dio como resultado la mencionada Curtis Knight Zeus, de la cual Clarke se convirtió en guitarrista, y con quienes registró dos álbumes en estudio, “The Second Coming” y “Sea Of Time”, ambos lanzados en 1974. Más tarde Clarke sería parte de Blue Goose junto a algunos de los miembros de la misma banda, pero una serie de malentendidos la llevaron a su disolución. Poco después fundaría el cuarteto Continuous Performance, pero contrariamente en lo que respecta a su nombre, sus demos resultaron de poco interés para los sellos discográficos, lo que lo derivó en su final. Un tercer intento de grupo junto a algunos de los ex-miembros de Blue Goose también pasó sin pena ni gloria, y Clarke decidió entonces alejarse de la industria musical.

3

Larry Wallis, Lemmy Kilmister y Lucas Fox: el Motörhead que no llegó a ser

9. NO FUE EL PRIMER GUITARRISTA DE MOTÖRHEAD
Eddie Clarke se unió a Motörhead en 1976 reemplazando al guitarrista Larry Wallis tras una presentación formal del salvajísimo Taylor, que recientemente había ingresado en las filas del trío en lugar del baterista Lucas Fox. Con esa formación, la más eternamente clásica de todas, la banda grabaría sus discos de estudio más insignes y formativos, desde el álbum debut del mismo nombre del grupo (lanzado en agosto de 1977) pasando por “Overkill”(1979), “Bomber” (1979) y “Ace of Spades” (1980) hasta llegar a “Iron Fist” (1982), a los que deben agregarse el legendario trabajo en vivo “No Sleep ’til Hammersmith”, editado a mediados de 1981. Por su parte, la formación Kilmister-Wallis-Fox llegó a grabar el álbum “On Parole” en 1975, pero este (que iba a ser el debut) no se editó en su momento… y esa, aunque vinculada a la que estamos contando, es otra historia.

4

Mott The Hoople en 1973: de izq. a der., Peter Overend Watts, Dale Griffin, Morgan Fisher, el casi Motörhead Ariel Bender y el inefable Ian Hunter

8. CLARKE CASI FORMÓ PARTE DE UN MOTÖRHEAD VERSIÓN CUARTETO
En su autobiografía “Lemmy – White Line Fever”, escrita junto a Janiss Garza y publicada en 2002, Lemmydescribe de esta forma el ingreso de Fast Eddie a las filas de Motörhead: “Originalmente había intentado que Motörhead fuera una banda de cuatro miembros, y probamos un par de guitarristas. Uno de ellos fue Ariel Bender –a quien en aquel momento se lo conocía como Luther Grosvenor- que había estado en Mott The Hoople y en Spooky Tooth. Hicimos algunos ensayos con él, pero no funcionó. Era un tipo agradable, pero realmente no era de nuestro estilo. No tenía el mismo sentido del humor que el resto de nosotros, y no podía imaginarme estar en un micro con él. Seguimos como trío con Wallis, hasta que encontramos a Eddie Clarke, con quien de todas formas continuamos siendo así. Phil conoció a Eddie en momentos en que ambos estaban trabajando en la renovación de una casa flotante en Chelsea. Pero en realidad no fue él quien lo trajo, sino Aeroplane Gertie, que era recepcionista de un estudio de grabación en la misma zona, donde ensayábamos gratis… de todas maneras Motörhead siempre funcionó realmente bien como trío, y aún lo hace hoy en día. Si hay dos guitarras, entonces a veces vas a terminar pisando la línea, porque si los dos guitarristas no tocan al mismo tiempo -por supuesto, a eso sumale el bajo- puede ser realmente problemático. Pero con un solo guitarrista, podés hacer de todo”.

7. ENTRÓ A MOTÖRHEAD UN SÁBADO A LAS 8 AM (!)
La anécdota que cuenta como Eddie consiguió finalmente ser empleado en la banda, luego de algunas audiciones, da la perfecta impresión de lo que el trío requería, y lo más importante, lo que deseaban las legiones de fans. “Era una mañana de sábado, estaba tirado en la cama, en mi departamento. Y de golpe golpean la puta puerta, un ruido infernal; ¡pensé que la puerta se iba a venir abajo!”, contaba el guitarrista. “Eran además las ocho de la mañana, y justo acababa de meterme en la cama. Así que me levanté de un salto, corrí a la puerta, y allí estaba Lemmy. Tenía un cinturón de balas en una mano y una campera de cuero en la otra. Me las dio, diciendo ‘Tenés el trabajo’, y sin más, se las tomó. ¡Fue algo jodidamente clásico! (Risas)”

5

El Motörhead clásico, en la época en que querían estar de la cabeza y emborrachar sus corazones… bueno, en todo momento

6. SE GANÓ SU APODO… DE RÁPIDO QUE ERA, NOMÁS
“Fast” (rápido, veloz), más que un apodo, parecía el primer nombre del cantante; este mote se lo puso Lemmy, al presentarlo al público durante un show del grupo. “De movida intenté encontrarles sobrenombres a todos. Los apodos son buenos, a la gente le gustan. Y entonces Eddie se convirtió en ‘Fast Eddie’ Clarke, lo que era algo lógico. Quiero decir, era un guitarrista realmente veloz”, cuenta Lemmy en “White Line Fever”. A pesar de su asociación instantánea con el hard rock, al igual que muchos de los músicos del estilo de la escena británica que promediaban su edad, Clarke era básicamente un guitarrista de blues eléctrico y rock’n’roll clásico inglés de pura cepa, más cerca de otros contemporáneos como el irlandés Rory Gallagher, a modo de ejemplo. Basta sólo con escuchar con profundidad algunos de sus tonadas estrictamente bluseras en canciones como “Lawman” o “Step Down”, o de rock’n’roll primitivo, como en la versión grabada para el disco debut del grupo del clásico “The Train Kept A-Rollin’”, o bien en “Dance” o en “Bite The Bullet” (¡rockabilly!) de “Ace of Spades”, o en “All The Aces”, incluida en “Bomber”. Y ni hablar de la canción que le da título a este último disco, la cual podría bien definirse como “Chuck Berry en estado anfetamínico”, entre otras tantas.

5. SUPO LLEVAR LA VOZ CANTANTE
En su paso por Motörhead, Fast Eddie no sólo había plasmó su sello fundamental en el sonido de la banda con su guitarra -o en materia compositiva- sino que también tuvo su oportunidad de encargarse de las voces de algunas de las canciones, como en el caso de “Beer Drinkers And Hell Raisers”, originalmente de la autoría de ZZ Top y “I’m Your Witch Doctor” de John Mayall, cantada a dúo junto a Lemmy y originalmente parte del EP “Beer Drinkers…” lanzado en 1980. Clarke también registró las partes vocales de las diversas versiones de “Step Down” editadas a través del tiempo en reediciones o setsrecopilatorios de Motörhead, o en la toma alternativa de “Stone Dead Forever”. Asimismo, es quien también se encargó de cantar en “Emergency”, la canción de las Girlschool que ambas bandas habían registrado juntas en el EP “St. Valentine’s Day Massacre”, y que también fue parte de la recopilación “No Remorse”, de 1984.

6

El día en que South Mimms se convirtió en el desierto de Arizona. Lo dífícil fue determinar quién era el Bueno, quién el Malo y quién el Feo

4. FUE EL RESPONSABLE DE LA ONDA WESTERN EN LA TAPA DE “ACE OF SPADES”
Aunque las indumentarias de Lemmy, Eddie y Phil Taylor en la portada del disco más representativo de Motörhead evoquen al Far West y al legendario desierto de Arizona, la foto que ilustra la tapa del álbum “Ace Of Spades” no sólo fue tomada en un arenero de la zona sur de Londres (!), sino que además fue el mismísimo Eddie Clarke quien tuvo la idea de que se vistieran así: “Hicimos la sesión de fotos para la tapa del álbum en un día frío y ventoso de otoño. Todos piensan que fuimos al desierto, pero en realidad se hizo en South Mimms, al sur de Londres”, rememora Lemmy en la biografía escrita junto a Janiss Garza. “La onda Western fue idea de Eddie: tenía un ardiente deseo de ser Clint Eastwood. Entiendan que en esos momentos yo era el único que conocía América. Todos lucíamos bastante bien, aunque vestidos como pistoleros. Tuvimos un problemita con el guardarropas: las tachas con forma de picas de mis pantalones estaban muy distantes unas de otras. Quité las de una pierna y las pegué a la otra, así que sólo me pudieron tomar fotos de un solo lado. Fuera de eso, todo anduvo bastante bien”.

3. SE FUE DE MOTÖRHEAD A CAUSA DE WENDY WILLIAMS… ¡Y DE TAMMY WYNETTE!
Clarke abandonaría a la banda en 1982, no satisfecho con las sesiones de grabación del álbum “Iron Fist”, a lo que se agregó su manifiesto desacuerdo con que el grupo grabara un cover de “Stand By Your Man” (canción original de Tammy Wynette) junto a Wendy O. Williams, Richie Stotts y Wes Beech de la banda Plasmatics, considerando que eso traicionaba los principios artísticos de la Motörhead. En sus propias palabras: “Bueno, fue una de esas cosas. Querían hacer ese EP con Wendy O. Williams, y era todo un fuckin’desastre. Era terrible, digo, algo malísimo. Lo produje yo. Hicimos ensayos, y después teníamos tres días de grabación en Toronto. Grabamos las pistas básicas y después Wendy las cantó, pero no sonaba bien. Tuve una charla con ella y me dijo que prefería cantarla en otra nota, así que al otro día volvimos a grabarla, pero tampoco sonaba bien. De hecho sonaba horrible. Pero Lemmy no estaba de acuerdo, y tuvimos una gran pelea. Eran cerca de las 7 de la mañana, y les propuse parar un rato para comer algo. Pero me compré algo de alcohol, regresé al hotel y me emborraché. No podía hacerlo. Entonces ellos vinieron a mi cuarto, y les dije que era algo terrible: ‘Somos Motörhead, no quiero que la hagamos’. Pero ellos me dijeron, ‘bueno, la vamos a hacer igual’. Entonces les dije, ‘no pueden hacerlo, ¡es pura basura!’, pero insistieron, y se los volví a decir. ‘Si siguen insistiendo, no me va a quedar más remedio que irme del grupo’. Y ellos me dijeron, ‘Muy bien, entonces andate al carajo’”. Lo que dejaría entonces en claro que Clarke no fue quien optó por alejarse, sino que acabó siendo echado. “Philty fue el principal instigador de mi exclusión de la banda. Fijate que no lo estoy llamando ‘alejamiento’, ya que esa no había sido mi decisión. Yo me imaginaba morir en el escenario junto a Motörhead, así que fue todo un golpe que decidieran que no siga junto a ellos”. Tras buscar desesperadamente a alguien que lo reemplace (incluyendo una oferta rechazada al mismísimo Steve “Lips” Kudlow deAnvil) , finalmente Lemmy y Taylor dieron con Brian David “Robbo” Robertson, ex-guitarrista de Thin Lizzy. Clarke haría su último show junto a Motörhead el 14 de mayo de 1982 en el Palladium de la ciudad de New York, y recién volvería a grabar junto al grupo en 2000, cuando tocó en “No Class”, “The Chase Is Better Than the Catch” y “Overkill” para el álbum en vivo “Live At Brixton Academy”, del cual también participaron otros guitarristas invitados.

7

Fastway, ochentoso y en blanco y negro: una nueva etapa en la carrera de Eddie

2. EN FASTWAY LOGRÓ TENER EL TIMÓN ENTRE MANOS
Ya para el año siguiente de su partida (o despido) de Motörhead, Fast Eddie tenía una mejor idea entre mangas: la de estar al frente de una banda que le otorgue mayor protagonismo, para la cual convocó al legendario bajista Pete Way, que por entonces tenía la idea de abandonar a UFO y, tras combinar sus nombres artísticos, formar el grupo Fastway. Los ensayos de la banda, en los que incluso llegaron a audicionar a Topper Headon, baterista de The Clash, finalmente terminaron habilitando el ingreso de Jerry Shirley, ex-baterista de Humble Pie, agregando al por entonces desconocido vocalista irlandés Dave King y al bajista de sesión Mick Feat, con quienes editaron su homónimo disco debut en 1983. Después de girar extensivamente, Fastway tuvo un breve final al año siguiente, para retornar a la escena en 1986 y más tarde, idas y venidas mediante, y diversos cambios de integrantes del grupo, registrar otros seis trabajos de estudio (desde “All Fired Up” de 1984, hasta “Eat Dog Eat”, lanzado en 2011)

8

Eddie Clarke, en una de sus últimas imágenes

1. LA RECTA FINAL, SOLISTA Y BLUSERA
Tras Fastway, Clarke comenzó a sentir que “la vida en la carretera” había comenzado a percudir su salud, lo que lo llevó a permanecer varias semanas hospitalizado y, una vez recuperado, editar en 1994 su primer disco en solitario “It Ain’t Over Till It’s Over” (que incluía la participación vocal de Lemmy en “Laugh At The Devil”). Trece años después, en 2007, vería la luz “Fast Eddie Clarke Anthology”, un CD doble que, como su título lo indica, incluía buena parte de sus trabajos anteriores y posteriores a su paso por Motörhead. En 2014 volvería a abordar su raíces bluseras tras editar “Make My Day – Back To Blues” junto al pianista Bill Sharpe, trabajo que precedió a su colaboración en “Warfare”, el disco de la banda Evo lanzado en 2017, que terminó convirtiéndose en su aparición discográfica final.

EPÍLOGO
En una entrevista que tuvo lugar en 2016, tras ser indagado sobre su propio estado de salud tras la súbita muerte de sus ex-compañeros de Motörhead Phil Taylor y Lemmy (que se dieron en un plazo de apenas dos meses hacia finales de 2015), el ex-guitarrista del trío declaró al respecto: “Bueno, no me resulta un lugar muy envidiable, pero así es cómo es. Paré de ‘vivir de fiesta’ de la manera fuerte en que ellos lo hacían. Phil siguió haciéndolo hasta que sufrió un aneurisma en 2010 y Lemmy, aunque siempre resultó más cuidadoso desde que lo conocí en 1975, estoy seguro de que también lo hacía. Lo que significa un tiempo muy largo para vivir de esa manera. Pero el viejo Lem era fuerte como un buey. En cuanto a mí, dejé de beber hace varios años, así que tenía ventaja sobre los otros. La muerte de Lemmy fue todo un shock para mí”.

9

Lemmy & Eddie, en épocas más felices y de grandes (aunque no muy elegantes) sonrisas

Clarke concluye, casi como anticipando la despedida: “Había estado viendo a Phil, y se movía despacio. Y después falleció. La noche en que murió, yo estaba en la entrega de los Classic Rock Awards en Londres, y Lemmy también se encontraba ahí. Charlé un poco con él, y estaba en un estado de mierda. Me asustó mucho. Se lo veía muy frágil, y pensé, ‘carajo, me pregunto si va a poder seguir adelante…’ Pero nunca pensé que podía llegar a morirse, en todo caso que iba a parar de salir de gira. Desde ya, más tarde recibí aquella llamada telefónica de su manager después de Navidad. Le habían diagnosticado un cáncer muy grande. Le quedaban dos meses de vida, y se murió esa misma noche”. Tres grandes se fueron, pero su recuerdo permanece, rudo, rockero… e imborrable.

CON ARIEL ROT EN MADRID: “LO QUE A NOSOTROS NOS CAUTIVÓ FUE LA PELIGROSIDAD DEL ROCK”

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 13 de diciembre de 2017

Ciento cincuenta. Es más o menos el número promedio de preguntas que se me ocurre formularle a Ariel Rot mañana a la tarde, una vez que arribe a la capital española. Tal vez incluso algunas más. Mientras tanto estoy en el aeropuerto de Miami en medio de una escala de 14 horas y, si algo me sobra, es tiempo para decidir cuáles voy a terminar eligiendo. Entrevistar a un músico del cual uno es un profundo admirador no es cosa fácil. Hay que ponerse firme y hacerlo de la manera más objetiva posible, tarea que ronda lo infrahumano. Rot tiene una carrera de peso histórico que comienza con un rol primario: el de ser miembro fundacional de Tequila, la banda que cambió todo desde su llegada a la escena musical española hace ya más de cuatro décadas, y a la que -deliberadamente- le hemos dedicado buena parte de la conversación.

El mismo tiempo que lleva viviendo en la Madre Patria desde que la situación política que regía en Argentina, comandada por la barbarie de la Junta Militar que tomó a la fuerza las riendas del país a partir de la segunda mitad de la década del 70, y que obligara a Ariel Rot y familia a emigrar a territorios más saludables. Todo mucho antes de ser parte de Los Rodríguez, que también llegó para revitalizar los esquemas del rock hispanoparlante y de quienes también fue, digan lo que digan, su alma musical y autor de sus más grandes éxitos, hoy también parte del catálogo popular en español. O de su exquisita carrera en solitario, que viene superando en duración a sus proyectos anteriores por varias cabezas.

_MG_5551UNA CHARLA CON ARIEL. Café de por medio y en una confitería paqueta de Madrid que mira al Parque del Oeste de la ciudad, sentarse a charlar con Ariel –músico, compositor y por sobre todas las cosas, guitarrista supremo de rock and roll en su sentido más literal- implica una recorrida a lo largo de muchos años y aventuras tornándose uno de esos momentos para los que uno sabe nunca habrá tiempo que alcance para repasar en su conjunto. Menuda tarea para alguien como yo, apenas cinco horas después de aterrizar en España y con una bolsa interminable de preguntas. Por el resto, Rot cumple con todos los requisitos del entrevistado fiel: se emociona cuando habla de rock, y hasta le brillan los ojos para reafirmarlo. De risa contagiosa y enarbolando el estandarte de la humildad de los grandes, aquí están algunas de las respuestas a aquella lista de interrogantes que seguramente precisarán de otro futuro encuentro. Y a los que agrega su más reciente andanza: un nuevo emprendimiento enológico a la altura de todas esas canciones geniales a las que nos tiene acostumbrados desde siempre.

Me gustaría empezar hablando de aquellos primeros tiempos en que, aún siendo muy chico y viviendo en Buenos Aires, escuchabas grupos como Almendra o Manal, entre tantos. Y, de paso, ¿cómo te las arreglabas con los discos de las bandas de afuera? Digo, no eras de los que tenían ese hermano mayor que solía comprarlos y del cual los escuchábamos, como pasaba en muchas familias.
De eso se encargaban más o menos los amigos de mi hermana. Recuerdo el día que cumplí diez años, cuando me dijeron que pida “Led Zeppelin II” y “Stand Up” de Jethro Tull. Y Cecilia (N.: su hermana, la actriz Cecilia Roth) también traía discos. Santana, y esas cosas. En realidad, previo al rock, me gustaba toda la música. Estudiaba piano. Me enseñaban canciones de Bela Bartok, y me encantaban. Y después me ponían un disco de Joan Manuel Serrat, y también me gustaba. Eran los discos que había en casa. Y a partir de ahí ya empecé a tener mi propia colección.

2

(Foto archivo Efeeme.com)

Indudablemente fuiste muy prematuro respecto a la música.
Éramos muy prematuros, pero no sólo por eso. Y después tuve una época en la que escuchaba mucho rock progresivo, pero eso fue más adelante. Yes, Genesis, King Crimson, y todo eso. Lo que fue un período muy jodido, porque había dejado de tocar la guitarra, ya que no sabía tocar lo que escuchaba. Me costaba tanto entender cuál era la parte de guitarra dentro de todo eso que sonaba… estaba todo muy procesado. Escuchaba a Steve Howe y me decía, “¿qué es esto? Nunca voy a poder tocar así. Hay que estudiar mucho para ser un buen guitarrista”

3

Ariel y su mamá: primeros pasitos musicales

¿Pero al menos intentabas hacerlo?
No, tuve un bloqueo, pero mucho antes de eso, fui muy precoz no sólo porque tenía todos esos discos, sino porque también íbamos a ver conciertos. Fui muchas veces a ver a Arco Iris, a La Pesada del Rock and Roll, ¡con Pinchevsky y Kubero Díaz! Eso era algo peligroso… O a Pescado Rabioso y Aquelarre, en El Teatrito, ¡aquel concierto de la sirena!, nosotros estábamos ahí. Pero nunca vi a Pappo, ni tampoco a Manal. Íbamos a los conciertos con sólo 10 años de edad, y para entonces con Leo Sujatovich ya queríamos formar un grupo. Componíamos canciones todo el tiempo. Nos juntábamos y, en vez de ponernos a jugar como los chicos normales, nos encerrábamos con una guitarra, un piano, algo que se asemejara a una batería, lo que podíamos…

Por lo que sé, durante esos encuentros incluso llegaron a grabar algo de modo amateur, pero después esa cinta se perdió.
Sí, esa cinta se perdió. Puede que Leo conserve alguna cosa, pero lo grabábamos en cintas de esas de carrete. Y llegamos a grabar nuestra “obra cumbre”, que fue “Ópera Vida” (Risas) ¡Hicimos una ópera! ¡Es que éramos muy precoces! Las letras de “Ópera Vida” eran de Cecilia. Era algo así como Nacimiento, Infancia, Adolescencia, Madurez, Vejez y Muerte.

El ciclo completo…
Sí. Y teníamos diez años cuando la grabamos. Y también agregamos una flauta dulce, hicimos nuestros arreglos…Y además los dos estudiábamos guitarra con Claudio Gabis. Nos tomábamos el 64 y nos íbamos hasta Barrancas de Belgrano, después caminábamos diez cuadras, llegábamos a la casa de Claudio y nos tirábamos ahí. Aparte él nos dejaba tocar nuestras canciones, y también nos enseñaba a arreglarlas. Nos decía, “a ver, si él está tocando eso, ¿por qué vos tocás lo mismo? Tenés que tocar otra cosa. Yo buscaría por aquí…” Y eso no es algo que sólo aprendí, sino que también lo sigo aplicando, eso de cómo tienen que funcionar dos guitarras para que no salga algo muy cuadrado, ¿no?

4

Un Ariel más grande, otra vez junto a su mamá: los años pasan, la pasión musical queda

¡Sin dudas te salió muy bien! Y también supongo habrá influido tu mamá, la legendaria cantante, pianista y musicóloga Dina Rot, ya que entiendo que no sólo escuchabas su música, sino también la de los músicos amigos de ella que iban de visita a tu casa.
Exactamente. Por ejemplo, hubo muchas veces en las que vino Paco Ibáñez. Y también una noche estuvo Vinicius, con sus músicos. Venían de un concierto y llegaron a casa muy tarde, cuando yo ya estaba durmiendo. Obviamente no me despertaron, porque yo tenía que ir al colegio al día siguiente. ¡Y eso es algo que jamás debería perdonárselo a mis padres! (Risas) ¿Cómo se iban a imaginar que 40 años más tarde yo iba a estar preguntándome por qué mierda no me despertaron aquella noche? ¿Te das cuenta? Estaba Vinicius De Moraes tocando en el salón de mi casa tomándose una botella de whisky, ¡y yo durmiendo en el cuarto!

¡Qué pecado!
Sí. Pero de todos los que venían, los que más me gustaban eran los del Cuarteto Cedrón, que siempre traían un contrabajo y percusión, y se ponían a tocar en casa. Eso era algo grandioso.

Bueno, seguramente todo eso te habrá marcado, y mucho, porque años más tarde ibas a terminar grabando “Eche 20 Centavos En La Ranura” para tu disco “Lo Siento, Frank”.
Es que cuando era chico, ésa era una de mis canciones favoritas; si bien no entendía mucho de qué hablaba, ni nada, pero era una canción que me encantaba.

TEQUILA RECIÉN SERVIDO
De alguna manera en nuestras casas siempre sonaba tango o folklore, algo que en tu música suele estar bastante presente. Pero el rock and roll, según tengo entendido, te llega de Alejo Stivel, tu amigo de la infancia y compañero en Tequila, que es quien te adentra en la música de los Stones y Chuck Berry.
Bueno, después de esa etapa sinfónica que te comentaba, volví a tocar, y a emocionarme, y a querer componer, porque Alejo es quien vuelve a traerme ese aire. Él quería empezar a tocar, y entonces yo pensé que había que volver a lo básico, ¡con 14 años de edad! (Risas) Y ahí fue cuando empecé a escuchar mucho el álbum “It’s Only Rock’n’Roll” de los Stones. “¿Y esto de dónde viene? Aah, viene de Chuck Berry. A ver Chuck Berry…” Y entonces ahí empecé a armar mi estilo. Pero habiendo estudiado con Gabis, conocía al blues. Y también bastante de swing, por haber estudiado con Walter Malosetti.

5

Unos muy jóvenes Alejo Stivel y Ariel, allá lejos y hace tiempo

Estilos que después también ibas a terminar incorporando a tu carrera solista, sobre todo en tus últimos discos.
Sí, absolutamente.

Visto desde afuera, más allá de la buena escuela que resultó de todo eso, lo mejor fue que se dio de manera natural. Porque la música ya estaba en tu casa, desde el momento en que tenías una madre que se dedicaba a eso. Y aparte los de nuestra generación fuimos bastante prematuros, tal como decías, comprando discos a los 8 años de edad, o buscando con ansias esas revistas de música que investigábamos, cuando ahora es algo más propio de la adolescencia.
Sí, yo creo que le prestábamos mucha más atención a cada cosa que teníamos. Creo que ahora eso de que haya tanta información, hmm… Yo lo veo en mis hijos, están muy ansiosos, viven pasando a otra cosa todo el tiempo, entonces es como que no terminan de aprenderse un solo disco de memoria. Ni siquiera terminan de aprenderse una canción. Escuchan la parte de la canción que les gusta, y nada más. Cuando mi hijo me muestra la música que escucha, me dice “esperá, te paso el estribillo”. Y yo le digo que no hace falta que se apure, que tengo tiempo. Pero está acelerado y quiere mostrarme quince cosas al mismo tiempo. Él escucha hip-hop, está más identificado con eso.

Bueno, es lo que están escuchando casi todos los chicos hoy, o los que van camino a la adolescencia.
Sí, pero también porque ahí hay algo interesante. Yo creo que lo que a nosotros nos cautivó fue la peligrosidad del rock. Y ahora el rock no les brinda eso a los chicos. Coldplay, y todo eso… no ven ningún peligro ahí. En cambio en el hip-hop sí sucede, y es algo que está muy identificado con los chicos y su pinta, sus capuchas, eso de la marginalidad…todo eso los cautiva más. Y el rock dejó de tener esas razones, salvo que te metas en una movida muy under, y no sé tampoco en qué país. Probablemente en algunas ciudades de Estados Unidos todavía exista aquella tradición de los Stooges o del rock más pesado, y no me refiero a su sentido musical, sino al de modo de vida.

En cierta forma, si no existiera esa cuota de peligrosidad, esa cuota de alarma, entonces no es rock.
Bueno, no sé si es que tiene que tenerla. Quiero decir, yo no puedo inventarme ahora una vida que no es la mía. Ya pasé por eso, ya tuve mi dosis. Ahora se dio así. No llevo una vida peligrosa, si bien hoy en día vivir es algo peligroso. No puedo fabricar una estética. Entonces el rock también tiene eso, es música, y te lo podés tomar muy en serio. Como música, da mucho de sí. Podés ir de la simpleza a la máxima complejidad. Y trabajar con tan pocos elementos también requiere de mucho ingenio y trabajo.

Y a pesar de esa simpleza, todavía nos sigue emocionando.
¡Por supuesto! El rock, el blues…Willie Dixon, por ejemplo. De repente te preguntás, “¿pero solamente este tipo compuso todas estas canciones?” Que encima tienen los mismos tres acordes. ¡Y son todas brillantes!

Yendo mucho más atrás en la historia, hay algo que siempre me despertó curiosidad. Tu historia familiar es absolutamente parecida a la mía, ya que ambos somos nietos de inmigrantes rusos y con madres judías. Si bien no hay dudas que sí la tuvo en el caso de tu mamá (N.: Dina Rot grabó muchas canciones en “ladino”, dialecto del castellano que hablaban los descendientes de los judíos expulsados de la península ibérica en el siglo XIV), ¿lo judaico tuvo algún tipo de influencia en tu carrera?
Sólo en la cocina (Risas) En la música, mucho no lo veo. Bueno, tal vez esa cosa del sufrimiento judío, ¿no? Eso de la culpa y demás te da una sensibilidad y un feeling a la hora de tocar.

Bueno, hay grandísimos músicos de origen judío…
Sí, pero también hay grandes músicos argentinos (Risas)

6

Ariel junto a la nueva versión de Tequila, en vivo en Aranda De Duero, España, el 23/9/2017 (foto: @M. Sonaglioni)

UNA VIDA A LA ESPAÑOLA
Después de estar aquí en España por más de cuatro décadas, lo que representa casi tres cuartos de tu vida, no se me ocurre otro caso de un músico argentino que lleve viviendo tanto tiempo en el exterior pero que aún haciendo básicamente rock, mantenga las raíces musicales de su lugar de origen en su música actual, o incluso otros géneros latinoamericanos. Espero que la pregunta no te resulte muy rebuscada…
No, para nada. Estoy en Madrid desde que cumplí 16. Y hay que descontarle cinco años, que son aquellos en que volví a Buenos Aires. Así que son casi 35 años aquí. Yo creo que en gran parte eso sucede por lo que viví en mi infancia, todo lo que te estaba contando hace un rato. Me refiero a todos esos discos de rock argentino hasta el año ’77 o ’78 que yo escuchaba, que creo que son joyas. Para mí, en cuanto a calidad, pienso que es donde más arriba se llegó. Al menos a nivel general. Después habrá casos aislados, pero esos discos me marcaron mucho y también los escuché mucho. Y además los sigo escuchando. Al mismo tiempo yo compartía todo el mundo anglo con eso, y para mí es como que era lo mismo. Para mí, Pescado Rabioso era como los Beatles.

7

“Matrícula De Honor” (Novola, 1978), el álbum debut de Tequila

No es que unos te resultaran necesariamente más importantes que los otros…
No, no eran más importantes. Entonces en esa época yo era muy “esponja”, y eso queda mucho. Puede darse no tanto por lo que escuchaba en mi casa sino también por lo que sonaba en la radio, en la tele, o lo que se estaba escuchando… Era la música que sonaba de fondo, y de alguna manera me resultó muy fácil asimilarlo, aunque si me escucha un folklorista o un músico de tango de verdad, tal vez les parezca un mamarracho, porque no tengo ni puta idea. Por ejemplo, aprendí mucho con Eduardo Makaroff, de Gotan Project, con quien descubrí algunos yeites, o del swing. Pero claro, aprender bien el swing del tango lleva toda una vida, no es algo que se aprende porque te pongas a tocarlo. Son géneros para tocarlos toda la vida, son como algunos instrumentos.

Yendo más al rock en sí, ya sabés que sos mi guitarrista de rock and roll “en español” favorito de todos los tiempos. A lo que también podría agregarle tu parte de escribir canciones. Pero además creo que sos un excelente letrista, algo que vos mismo dijiste recientemente en una entrevista, cuando comentaste que te habías dado cuenta que habías mejorado mucho en ese aspecto. Sin embargo, lo que más me gustaría destacar de tu carrera es tu rol como miembro de Tequila junto a Alejo, la historia de dos músicos argentinos que llegaron aquí para formar un grupo que terminó cambiando los esquemas del rock en España. Lo que explica a la perfección por qué aquí sos un músico tan querido y valorado.
Yo creo que hay grupos, compositores o artistas que tienen una clara influencia de Tequila, pero pienso que igualmente hubiera terminado ocurriendo lo mismo con otros. Era un momento en que España tenía que recuperar el tiempo perdido.

8

Tequila de izq. a der: Julián Infante, Alejo Stivel, Manolo Iglesias, Felipe Lipe y Ariel. Dale dale con el look…

Que fue mucho.
Sí, claro. Entonces creo que España se subió al tren de la historia justamente en una época curiosa, porque la gran influencia de esos tiempos fueron los grupos punk. Ramones, Sex Pistols… Digamos que la destreza musical no estaba valorada, y eso marcaba la diferencia entre nosotros y ellos. Veníamos de una época en la que esa destreza, y no el virtuosismo, tenía mucha importancia para nosotros. Tequila tocaba muy bien.

Bien, pero bien de en serio.
Sí, y sin embargo todos los grupos que surgieron por entonces estaban aprendiendo a tocar. Casi tuvieron que aprender a tocar en los escenarios, tal fue el boom que hubo. No sé si lo nuestro fue una habilidad, fue simplemente llegar en un momento en el que históricamente cubrimos un hueco que alguien tenía que cubrir. En todo caso, mi habilidad es la de hacer de todo bastante bien (Risas)

Sigo con los elogios… Yo diría que muy bien.
Es como que le he puesto la energía un poco a todo, ¿no? A veces me junto a tocar con guitarristas que tocan muchas más horas que yo, y con unas técnicas que yo jamás podría tocar. Tendría que dejar todo el resto de las otras cosas que hago y dedicarme solamente a la guitarra…

O tal vez sea que esos guitarristas son más jóvenes, y por eso dispongan de más tiempo para hacerlo.
No, porque también son guitarristas, pero que no han tenido que centrarse en otros proyectos. Cuando retomé mi carrera en solitario después de Los Rodríguez, tuve que intentar equilibrar la cosa, y tal vez me quedé un poco respecto a la guitarra durante unos años, para poder crecer como compositor, como cantante, o como frontman. Los últimos años, cuando empecé a hacer esos shows completamente solo en el escenario, también tuve que dedicarme mucho al piano. Y recién entonces volví a decirme “bueno, ya llegó el momento de volver a dar un empujón con la guitarra”… Igualmente creo que, si ya tocaste bien en algún momento de tu vida, si desarrollaste una técnica decente, entonces se trata de que tengas algo interesante para contar, y que se te reconozca cuando tocás.

moris-fiebre_de_vivir-frontalROT AND ROLL MUSIC
Como fuera, las influencias en tu estilo -Chuck Berry, Keith Richards, etc.- son muy marcadas, y no existe mucha gente que toque así, al menos del lado “hispano”. Hay un sonido tuyo que tiene que ver muy claramente con esa escuela original, y que se sigue manteniendo.
Sí, creo que tengo eso, pero también siempre hay un lado melódico en la guitarra, que es lo que hace que marque la diferencia. Que tus solos formen parte de la canción, y que hasta se puedan cantar, y que haya gente que se los sepa de memoria. Y para eso no es necesario ninguna técnica.

Tequila estuvo junto a Moris en los tiempos en que desembarcó en España, siendo otro caso de un argentino que llegaba aquí, y de hecho fueron la banda que lo secundó en la grabación de su LP “Fiebre De Vivir”. ¿Cómo recordás esos días?
¡Para nosotros Moris ya era un prócer! ¡A “De Nada Sirve” nos la sabíamos entera, con diez años de edad! Yo recuerdo esa época como una de las más felices de mi vida, mirá lo que te digo. Mi primera novia, mi primer disco y mi primera banda y aparte, de regalo, levantarme una mañana en la casa de esta chica para ir a grabar con Moris. No cabía adentro mío. ¡Estaba que me salía! (Risas)moris-fiebre-de-vivir-portada

Coincidieron las coordenadas. Que Uds. lleguen a España, que formen la banda, que llenen ese hueco que estaba tan vacío, y que justo al poco tiempo también llegue Moris.
Sí, por supuesto. En cierto modo cuando mis padres me dijeron que nos teníamos que ir de Argentina, llegado el momento en que tuvimos que ponernos a pensar adónde ir -y que por supuesto tenía que ser un sitio en que se hablase en español, ya sea México o España- yo tuve el presentimiento de que eso iba a ocurrir.

¿Habías tenido un presentimiento? ¿Cómo fue eso?
No se trató de un presentimiento del gran éxito que después fue Tequila, pero sí de que finalmente aquí iba a poder tener una banda, cosa que en Buenos Aires no podía haber tenido, ya que era más chico. Yo quería llegar aquí y tener un grupo. Y a los seis meses ya estaba tocando. Y a los ocho, dando conciertos.

Y además vendiendo muchos discos.
No, eso fue recién un año y medio después. Yo llegué en el ´76, el primer disco se grabó a fines de 1977, y salió recién en el ’78.

Igualmente fue todo muy veloz, y más a esa edad.
Y todo eso mezclado con los primeros 3 ó 4 meses aquí, que fueron raros.

Como lo decís en la canción “Vals De Los Recuerdos”…
Sí, un poco eso de la soledad, y lo de los amigos que no están. Igualmente todo se fue dispersando. No fui el único que se fue. Pasaron cosas. Fue una época en la que si me hubiera quedado… no sé. Tengo amigos que se quedaron y aguantaron bastante más.

429270_106962496102082_87007359_nDurante esos primeros años aquí en España, ¿alguna vez tuvieron la idea, o la ilusión, de regresar a Argentina?
El plan con mis padres era venir aquí por dos años, hasta que se calmase un poco todo. ¡Pero a los dos años no me sacaban de aquí ni con una ametralladora! ¡Me tenían que sacar con una escopeta! (Risas)

Sin embargo el recuerdo de la Tequilamanía continúa teniendo vigencia. Nunca dejó de ser una banda muy especialmente recordada en cada oportunidad en la que se hable de rock español.
A la gente le impactó mucho. A veces me subo a un taxi, o cuando me toca estar con alguien de mi generación que me reconoce, y no pueden parar de hablarme de Tequila. Y también están los que me vieron. A veces, cuando íbamos a tocar los pueblos, era como si hubieran llegado marcianos…

Me imagino, ¡con esas vestimentas!
¡Claro! Si Madrid era pueblerina, imaginate lo que eran los pueblos de España. No sabían ni lo que era un grupo de rock. Era todo muy primitivo, y nosotros íbamos con unas pintas tremendas. Y la situación en general también era muy rara, porque todavía no estaba armada la producción de conciertos, y mucho menos de rock. Entonces, por ejemplo, teníamos que ir a tocar a un sitio, y de repente íbamos en tren, ¡y nos bajábamos del tren con los Marshalls!

Bueno, hoy en día todavía hay músicos que recién empiezan, y que se ven obligados a moverse así.
OK, ¿pero a qué músico se le puede ocurrir la locura de meterse en un tren con un Marshall? (Risas) Entonces bajábamos en la estación, ¡y nos íbamos hasta el hotel empujando los Marshalls por la calle! Y la gente nos veía haciéndolo. Una vez íbamos empujando los amplificadores y un tipo gritó, “mira, ¡ahí van los Rolling Stones!” (Risas) Vio unos tipos ahí con los pelos largos, con pantalones rojos y no sé qué, y con amplificadores, y dijo ¡“son los Rolling Stones”! (Más risas)

TEQUILA ON THE ROCKS
Indudablemente lo de Uds. era un verdadero trabajo a pulmón…
Teníamos un tipo que se encargaba de todo, pero en los primeros tiempos, cuando todavía no habíamos grabado nada, sí, era todo a pulmón. Llegábamos de vuelta a Madrid a las seis de la mañana en la furgoneta, porque no había hotel donde parar en donde fuera que habíamos tocado la noche anterior, y todavía teníamos que descargar hasta el equipo de voces. Bajábamos todo, y después, ya de día, cada uno se iba a su casa.

Así y todo, desde afuera se ve como que la pasaban realmente bien.
Ya como adulto, a veces trato de recordar cómo fue. Porque claro, de joven pensás, “chicas, drogas, conciertos…”, todo ahí, sin tener que salir del hotel, ¿cómo no va a ser disfrutable? Pero yendo a algo más profundo, se trata de pensar cómo era realmente. Al mismo tiempo también percibíamos un poco la mala onda, y con Tequila en algunos momentos hasta hubo situaciones violentas y agresivas.

¿Lo decís por un rechazo de parte de la gente mayor de edad?
No, lo digo por el lado del público masculino. Eso era todo un inconveniente. Yo no podía salir solo a la calle. En aquel momento en Madrid se vivía una época muy pesada. A nosotros nos gustaba meternos en la zona donde pasaban las cosas. Y también donde te las pasaban. Y no siempre tenías a alguien disponible para que venga a tu casa. Entonces nos metíamos donde fuera que hubiera que meterse. Ser de Tequila también tenía sus momentos peligrosos. Una vez nos sacaron a botellazos de un concierto con Ian Dury en Barcelona. Eso ya fue casi al final… En los días finales de Tequila pasaron cosas jodidas, y una de esas cosas también fue que una vez nos robaron todos los equipos.

12

1981 vio la salida de “Confidencial”, el último disco de Tequila

¿Eso fue más o menos en la época del disco “Confidencial” (1981)?
No, fue después. Esa cosa del “ciudadano ilustre”, ¿no? La paradoja del éxito. También existía eso. Estaba todo eso del éxito, y de ser una estrella de rock and roll, o del pop. Porque también éramos estrellas pop. España nos encasilló un poco como un grupo “de fans”, con aquello de la Tequilamanía, las chicas…Y también sufríamos por eso. Y éramos tan jóvenes, que no pudimos manejarlo.

¿Pensás que situaciones de ese tipo fueron las que derivaron en el final del grupo?
Bueno, pasó que tuvimos que cambiarnos de nuestra sala de toda la vida, que era un ranchito divino al que venía demasiada gente. Un día llegamos y nos encontramos con que habían roto el techo y se habían llevado todo. Por otro lado empezó a pasar lo que te decía, empezamos a notar violencia en los conciertos. Luego pasó que, estéticamente, empecé a tener desacuerdos con Alejo. Yo quería probar otras cosas, como lo hice después en canciones como “Debajo Del Puente”

Claro, cambiaba el sonido de la época.
Cambiaba el sonido, y en ese sentido Alejo era mucho más conservador. A él no le interesaba ese cambio. Entonces, llegado el momento en que empezamos a componer lo que iba a ser el disco que iba a venir después de “Confidencial”, era muy difícil entenderse. Y aparte también estábamos muy pasados.

Toda una conjunción de factores.
Sí, todas esas cosas, hasta que finalmente yo les dije, “chicos, hagan lo que quieran, pero yo me voy”

Siempre lamenté que no haya habido otro disco, porque los demos que luego aparecieron como extras en la recopilación “Tequila Forever” (“Dudas”, “La Isla” y “No, No, No”) me parecen buenísimos.
Sí, pero eso ya no era Tequila, eso ya era cualquier cosa.

No obstante, “La Isla” es una gran canción, de hecho después incorporaste parte de su letra en la canción “Seducción”, que estaba en el álbum “Debajo Del Puente”.
Claro. ¡Muy bien! Esas cuatro canciones podrían haber formado parte de “Debajo Del Puente”, sin duda.

De hecho ya se perfilaba un sonido más moderno.
Pero eso ya pasaba en “Confidencial”. Para entonces nos gustaban los Clash, Elvis Costello… También queríamos un poco buscar por ese lado, y no sólo por el de los Stones. Incluso el disco es distinto desde la estética, con más fotos en blanco y negro. Ya habíamos empezado a interesarnos en nuevas cosas.

13

Tequila en blanco y negro: elviscostelleros, blondieros y newwaveros

O incluso más para cerca de Blondie, o de la New Wave, ¿no?
Sí, claro.

Y si bien eran todos excelentes músicos, no quiero dejar de mencionar a un gran baterista rítmico como Manolo Iglesias, fallecido en 1994, que sonaba realmente fresco, ¡y además muy salvaje!
Sí, y aparte era muy divertido cuando tocaba, muy gracioso. Como sabés, ahora estamos haciendo algunos shows con Tequila y el baterista, que es chileno, le copia muchos feels a Manolo. Era muy especial.

Definitivamente las cosas habían cambiado mucho en los últimos tiempos del grupo…
Y aparte para entonces ya nos tocaba compartir el “pastel”, el reinado. Estábamos muy tranquilos pero claro, ya había empezado a pegar el heavy. Nuestra compañía discográfica tenía a Barón Rojo y a Obús. Entonces, ya no nos trataban tan bien como al principio.

Y también ocurrió que la escena del heavy se afianzó mucho en España.
Sí, y eso es algo que sigue siendo muy fiel, como suele ser el público heavy de todo el mundo.

YO VIVÍA CON TEQUILA MUY CONTENTO
Recién mencionabas los problemas de estética que solías tener con Alejo, ¿pero también te pasaba en lo musical, o más estrictamente en lo vocal? De hecho, en los cuatro discos que editaron, solo cantaste una canción, “Estoy En La Luna”, donde compartís la parte vocal con Alejo. ¿Hubo algún otro intento de que cantes canciones en los discos de Tequila?
No, nunca me lo planteé. Recordemos que durante los primeros meses de Tequila, cuando todavía era un cuarteto, las canciones las cantaba yo. Me costó mucho convencer a Julián (N.: Infante, el otro guitarrista de la banda junto a Ariel y luego también compañero en los Rodríguez) que tenía que entrar otro argentino al grupo. Simplemente, Julián no quería que fuera así. Siempre me decía, “no, canta tú que cantas bien”. Y yo le decía, “no, pero tengo un amigo argentino, con el que compuse algunas de las canciones que estamos tocando…” ¡Pero Julián no quería saber nada! (Risas) Hasta que se fue el baterista original.

14

La formación original de Tequila, todavía cuarteto. De izq. a der. Julián(sentado), Ariel, Felipe y el Oso. (Foto: Archivo Ariel Rot)

¿El Oso?
El Oso, sí. Entonces hubo una época que estuvimos sin baterista , y uno de los experimentos que hicimos fue poner a Julián a la batería. Y ahí fue cuando finalmente me permitió que venga Alejo a cantar, y también como guitarrista.

De hecho Julián tocaba muy bien la batería. Recuerdo canciones como “Ya Soy Mayor”, en donde se encarga él de tocarla.
Y también está en “El Barco” el reggae. Pero Julián quería seguir tocando la guitarra, si bien Alejo ya estaba adentro del grupo, ¡Ya había puesto el piecito ahí! (Risas) Pero durante varios meses canté yo, si bien mi rol nunca fue el de cantante, digamos, de cuna. Así como sí lo fue como guitarrista. Yo podía vivir perfectamente sin cantar.

Al menos no lo habrá sido durante esa época, porque después sí fue algo que terminó formando parte fundamental de tu carrera.
Sí. Después de haberlo sufrido durante mucho tiempo, empecé a disfrutar de cantar, y también de eso de expresar y de contar cosas.

Volviendo a Julián, siempre pienso que, a pesar de su partida física hace ya varios años, de alguna manera sigue estando muy presente en tu vida. La melancolía tiene esas cosas: la amamos y la odiamos al mismo tiempo. Y siempre noto referencias nostálgicas que te llevan a él, como fue en el caso de “El Mundo De Ayer”. Bueno, en verdad nunca tuve la certeza de que fuera así. Pero sí que lo hiciste en tu último disco, en la canción “Broder”.
“Broder” está oficialmente dedicada a él. Siempre puede haber una frase dedicada a Julián en alguna canción. Y en “El Mundo…”, sí, hay momentos. Incluso hay estrofas dedicadas a Julián, pero es algo más genérico. “Broder” es más directo, acordándome de él… Lo del calabozo, todas cosas que pasaron…

Siempre me pregunté por qué es que después él dejó de aparecer o colaborar en tus aventuras solistas, habiéndolo hecho en tus dos primeros discos (“Debajo Del Puente” y “Vértigo”) Y si bien estuvieron juntos en los días de Los Rodríguez, que después no lo haya hecho cuando todavía vivía, cuando editaste “Hablando Solo” o “Cenizas En El Aire”.
Es que con él nunca hubo una despedida. Los Rodríguez terminamos todos un poco quemados. La gran ruptura en Tequila se dio con Alejo, porque componíamos juntos, pero siempre fue natural seguir tocando con Julián. Después de Los Rodríguez, yo necesité descansar de Julián. Hubo un largo tiempo en el cual no nos vimos. Y después de la separación de la banda, él desapareció por una temporada. Y cuando volvió ya estaba enfermo. Muy enfermo. Pero después se recuperó. Eso fue muy duro, porque llegó un momento en que nos decíamos “éste nos va a enterrar a todos” (Risas)

los-rodriguez-02-10-15Pero de alguna manera, insisto, siempre siguió estando presente.
Siempre estuvo muy presente, y también lo sigue estando, y tal vez, con el paso del tiempo, esa ausencia se hace más notoria, porque él no me llegó a conocer ya como padre. ¿Cómo hubiese sido esta etapa adulta? Digo, siendo un amigo tan fraternal, casi como un hermano… ¿Cómo hubiésemos llevado esta etapa de nuestras vidas? Tener un “gomía” así para compartir estos años hubiera sido algo muy poderoso.

¿Esperaban que él terminara así?
Yo creo que es al revés, que no podría haber ocurrido de otra manera.

¿Julián tenía un hijo, verdad? ¿Seguiste teniendo relación con su familia después de su muerte?
Dos hijos. De hecho, cuando murió, también ya era abuelo, de un bebé. ¿La familia de Julián? ¡Vinieron a un concierto de Tequila! Nos abrazamos, lloraron… todo.

Julián y Manolo ya no están, y Alejo sigue muy cerca tuyo, ¿pero acaso también seguís en contacto con Felipe Lipe, el ex bajista de Tequila?
No, nos distanciamos. Felipe vino a tocar en la gira reunión de Tequila de hace diez años, y la cosa salió mal. Él se dio cuenta de que estaba en inferioridad de condiciones, y entonces se retiró a tiempo.

16

Julián y Ariel, en otra postal de tiempos pasados

¿Nunca lograron recomponer esa parte?
Ahí ya nos distanciamos, tal vez medio definitivamente. En verdad con Felipe nunca nos peleamos, incluso cada tanto me llamaba. Y tampoco es que ahora haya habido una ruptura, pero tal vez esa vez nos permitió ver las diferencias que teníamos en la vida, en lo musical y en lo personal. Ya no teníamos mucho que ver. Tal vez lo único que nos unió fue ese pequeño momento cuando éramos pibes.

INFORMACIÓN CONFIDENCIAL
Me siento obligado a hacerte una pregunta “de fan”. En la canción “¿Qué Pasa Conmigo?” de “Confidencial”, que fue grabado en Inglaterra, aparece tocando la armónica un tal Paul Jones. ¿No será Paul Pond, no? Sabés de qué estoy hablando…
No, ese era el armonicista de Manfred Mann.

Exacto. Es precisamente por eso que te pregunto, porque al principio, Paul Jones usaba su nombre original, Paul Pond. O también su nombre artístico, P.P. Jones, en los días que tocaba junto a Brian Jones en Londres, antes que se formasen los Stones. De hecho, antes de la aparición de Jagger, Brian le había propuesto a Paul Jones cantar en la banda que quería formar. Y me pareció muy casual que el tipo que metió la armónica en la canción tuviera el mismo nombre.
No lo sé, pero el tipo era muy amigo de Peter McNamee, quien produjo el disco.

18Continuemos hablando de Tequila, no puedo evitarlo. Me gustaría que me hables sobre el disco que la banda alguna vez grabó para el mercado japonés, y que hoy por hoy resulta prácticamente inconseguible. De hecho lo único que hay dando vueltas por ahí es una de las canciones, en YouTube, al menos cierta vez la encontré ahí. ¿Es verdad que grabaron una canción de Leif Garrett para el disco?
No, no era de Leif Garrett, sino una que él versionaba, “Forget About You”(canta el estribillo de la canción). Los japoneses nos impusieron dos canciones. Y no sólo eso. Nos hicieron unas cuantas perrerías. Habían traducido las letras de Tequila al inglés, eran tremendas. …

¿No respetaron las letras originales? 
No, muy poco. Con clichés, frases manidas…

Volviendo a la nueva versión de la banda, Uds. ya habían hecho una pequeña gira reunión hace unos años, e incluso regrabaron “Que El Tiempo No Te Cambie”.
¡No, fue una gira grande!

Bueno, pero después eso cesó, y hace un tiempo, buceando en las benditas redes sociales, me sorprendió enterarme de esta nueva reunión del grupo.
Sí, ésta es menos formal, digamos. Surgió por una marca que quería hacer cuatro conciertos con la banda. Y decidimos hacerlos. Armamos la banda para esos cuatro shows. Pero luego empezaron a llamarnos y preguntar si había posibilidades de hacer alguna cosa más. No quisimos hacer eso de “otra vuelta”, ni tampoco promoción, pero si nos ofrecen durante un tiempo hacer conciertos, los vamos a hacer.

61FmubHZfaL._SX355_¿Tenés la idea también de retomar tu carrera solista? “La Manada”, tu más reciente trabajo, es realmente un disco grandioso.
Por el momento estoy sin proyecto en mente, pero sí estoy haciendo lo de Tequila, y voy a volver a hacer shows en solitario, lo mismo de aquel espectáculo que se llamó “Solo Rot”, con solo yo en el escenario. Un “one man show”, ¿no? Lo dejé de hacer hace dos años. Hablaba mucho, contaba muchas historias, y tal. No sé si ahora voy a hacerlo igual, tal vez a lo mejor cambie un poco el concepto. No lo tengo muy claro. Lo estoy armando. Pero no es un proyecto nuevo. Vengo de hacer tres discos de canciones nuevas –“Solo Rot”, “La Huesuda” y “La Manada”– que es algo que para mí está muy arriba, pero que tampoco trascendieron excesivamente. No sé si estoy motivado para otro disco así. Para mí, después de esa trilogía, me gustaría que el siguiente proyecto tuviese otra cosa. Todavía no lo sé. Son los discos que hice a partir de los 50 años. Porque ya en “Solo Rot” hablo del tema de la edad en canciones como “Manos Expertas”. Ya empiezo a hablar del tema. Los discos no son exactamente iguales entre sí, siendo “La Huesuda” el que más se diferencia de todos, porque tiene otro tipo de sonido. Últimamente tengo el reproductor de mp3 en “aleatorio” en el coche. Tengo un coche nuevo y, según me subo, empieza a sonar el teléfono, con todo lo que tengo. Y empecé a escuchar canciones mías, que también están ahí, y me sorprendió mucho el sonido de “La Huesuda”. De hecho me sorprendió muchísimo. Me parece una cosa muy distinta a lo que alguna vez hice. Canciones como “Mil Palabras Sucias Al Oído”… Creo que con José Norte se alcanzó un nivel muy fino.

Seguramente el productor tendrá mucho que ver con eso.
Sí. Bueno, es lo que estaba buscando en ese disco. Es algo que tenía muy claro. Yo quería usar otros instrumentos, y no los que siempre usaba. Ya venía con la gira del piano, y entonces compuse prácticamente todas las canciones así.

Claro, cosas como “Para Escribir Otro Final”.
Sí, son todas canciones muy pianísticas, y que por lo tanto puedo hacerlas todas en el piano. Mientras que “Solo Rot” y “La Manada” se parecen un poco.

Reitero, “La Manada” me pareció un álbum lindísimo, y además me gustó mucho que la canción que le da título al disco sea también quizás mi balada favorita de todas las que están ahí.
Yo encuentro en esa canción partes que me suenan a Dylan…

Y “En el Borde De La Orilla” me hace acordar a Moris…
Bueno, sí, ¡es casi un homenaje a él!

Mientras que en “Se Me Hizo Tarde Muy Pronto” escucho “Stay With Me”de los Faces.
¡Totalmente! Pero “La Manada”, la canción, tiene un momento “Wild Horses”. O tal vez es algo que imaginé yo, y que tal vez no tenga nada que ver.

¿Sos de poner todavía esos discos de Dylan o de los Stones que escuchabas al principio, ya sea en casa, o en el auto?
De vez en cuando. Escucho más roots, en todo caso. En el coche me gusta más escuchar a Chuck Berry. Pero volviendo a esos discos esenciales de nuestra vida, trato de no escucharlos mucho, porque me da la sensación de que, si lo hago, se va a perder el efecto.

¿Cómo es eso?
Sí, van a perder el efecto. Prefiero aguantarme, aguantarme y aguantarme. Que pase mucho tiempo y un día decir, “OK, lo voy a volver a escuchar”. Como para potenciar el efecto. Es como la abstinencia, para luego disfrutarlos más.

Hmm, muy interesante. Me resulta un buen consejo.
Claro, a mí me pasa. Y con los discos argentinos también. No puedo escuchar “Artaud” muy a menudo. Prefiero dosificar a esos discos, si no me da la sensación que la emoción puede gastarse.

Sin embargo, es una emoción permanente.
Bueno, cada uno lo lleva a su manera…

OTRAS BANDAS, OTRAS HISTORIAS
Antes que me olvide, creo que deberíamos hablar un poco de la etapa de Los Rodríguez y lo de la rumba catalana, básicamente en canciones como “Sin Documentos” o en “La Milonga Del Marinero Y El Capitán”, que en cierta manera fue un sonido que terminó siendo marca registrada en buena parte de las canciones del grupo.
En realidad teníamos pocas canciones de esas. Teníamos más “canción argentina rock”, que todo eso. Lo que pasa es que “Sin Documentos” fue muy famosa. Y lo mismo pasó con “La Milonga…”, que viene de González Tuñón.

Y más tarde hiciste lo mismo en “Dos De Corazones”
Sí, es una especie de milonga, pero mal tocada. Es una interpretación mía para poder tocar milonga sin saber ese swing, digamos.

20

El autor y el entrevistado de esta nota en Madrid, vestidos al tono para la ocasión (Foto: @M. Sonaglioni 2017)

En 2001, cuando editaste el video del show de “En Vivo Mucho Mejor”, usás una campera con inscripciones que dicen “Colectivo 60” y “Manosanta”… ¿Los usabas a modo de amuletos?
Oh, eso es muy triste, porque es una campera hecha por David Delfín, que también hizo las letras del arte de tapa de “Lo Siento, Frank”, y que murió este año. La explicación de todo eso es que responde al nombre de mi editorial, que se llama Manosanta, por Olmedo.

¡Qué grande!
Sí sí…Fueron como dos emblemas. David Delfín me dijo, “decime dos cosas que querés que te ponga en la chaqueta, que sean fuertes”. El público español habrá pensado que lo de “manosanta” es porque soy guitarrista, ¡pero nada que ver! (Risas)

A lo largo de tu carrera grabaste muchísimo material, cantidades de canciones, sobre todo en tu etapa solista. ¿Te quedó mucho material afuera, demos o inéditos que alguna vez pienses editar? ¿Algo tipo box set o similar?
No, qué va… Como máximo a mí siempre me sobran dos o tres canciones por disco. Yo voy haciendo la edición de un disco durante la composición.

¿Siempre mantuviste ese esquema de trabajo?
Sí, soy de desechar en el camino. De hecho algunas quedaron para discos que vinieron después.

Tuviste, y también seguís teniendo, una vida muy rica en historias. ¿Nunca pensaste en escribir una autobiografía? Algo que, ya que estamos, está muy en boga por estos días.
Bueno, podría ser… pero por el momento prefiero poner más energía en la música.

21BRODER, UN VINO PARA HERMANOS DE TODA LA VIDA
“Con mi amigo Federico Oldenburg se nos ocurrió desde hace unos años hacer un vino con cada disco que edito. El primero se llamó La Huesuda, como el nombre del disco anterior, y a éste le pusimos Broder, nombre de una de las canciones que están en el álbum ‘La Manada’, y que está dedicada a Julián Infante. Siempre optamos por bodegas especiales, que trabajan al margen de los gustos del mercado con uvas autóctonas y con mucho mimo, bodegas con las que me siento identificado porque en cierto modo tienen una filosofía con respecto al vino como la mía hacia la música. Es un vino ligero con un frescor poderoso, noble y extraordinariamente bien hecho. Es de Ánima Negra, una bodega de Mallorca, de la que soy un gran fan desde hace años, así que es un honor y un placer poder haber hecho un vino con ellos. ¡Salud!”

RAREZAS: ENCUENTRAN COPIAS SELLADAS DEL “BLACK ALBUM” DE PRINCE, UNO DE LOS VINILOS MÁS CAROS DE LA HISTORIA

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 13 de diciembre de 2017

Si las vueltas del destino te llevaron a convertirte en fan de Prince o en uno de sus entusiastas coleccionistas, tal vez sea entonces el momento de olvidar irte de vacaciones por un par de décadas, o de organizar una colecta de la que participen todos los miembros de tu familia, incluso esos primos y tíos lejanos que tal vez ahora sí se dignen a darte esa mano que alguna vez te prometieron… Como sea, si llegás a reunir la friolera de U$15.000, entonces tal vez ésta sea la oportunidad de hacerte de una copia original en vinilo del famoso “Black Album”, una pieza de colección que cuenta con la condición de ser uno de los discos más caros de la historia de la música toda.

2Y si de historia hablamos, ante todo debemos remitirnos a 1987, en ocasión en que los rumores indicaban que ése era el nombre del nuevo álbum que Prince estaba por lanzar. Claro que, a último momento, y muy cerca de su edición final, tras convencerse de que el disco era “maldito”, el recordado “genio de Minneapolis” no sólo optó por archivar su nuevo proyecto, sino que también ordenó a la Warner Bros., la compañía para la que grababa, destruir el medio millón de vinilos que ya habían sido impresos, prontos y listos a ofrecerse comercialmente. En consecuencia, los empleados del sello discográfico se vieron obligados a trabajar arduamente cuando les fue impartida la misión de destrozar todas y cada una de las copias del disco, tarea que también incluyó a varios CDs “de adelanto” (esos que suelen enviarse a la prensa musical ante de las ediciones comerciales definitivas), y fue recién 17 años más tarde, en 1994, que Prince finalmente accedió a que su compañía grabadora lo edite en formato de CD y cassette, sin abandonar su rechazo inicial a la propuesta en vinilo.
Pero el año pasado, algo después de su sorpresiva muerte, una copia promocional del “Black Album” apareció repentinamente a la venta en la web de Discogs, acaso el sitio online más completo de información sobre grabaciones de audio (oficiales y promocionales) que el mundo conozca. Fue ahí donde un suertudo cliente accedió a pagar la suma para hacerse de un ítem único en su especie, convirtiéndose así en el álbum más caro vendido alguna vez en esa plataforma, y por el que muchos otros coleccionistas, dado su alto valor, no pudieron salirle a competir.
3Para colmo de todos los males, los fans más acérrimos de Prince Rogers Nelson se ganaron un inesperado dolor de cabeza extra cuando en agosto del año pasado, una extraña edición en cassette titulada “The Versace Experience – Prelude 2 Gold”, que registraba versiones remezcladas de canciones de su trabajo de 1995 “The Gold Experience”, y que sólo se había regalado a modo de souvenir a los exclusivos asistentes al show de Versace de la Feria de la Moda de París de ese año, terminó comercializándose en el sitio de Discogs por la suma de 4.087 dólares, convirtiéndose en otro “coleccionable” de características económicamente inalcanzables para los fans de bolsillos más flacos.
A tres décadas del cancelado lanzamiento inicial del “Black Album” (al que muchos no dudaron en bautizar “el disco más buscado de la historia de la música”), los avatares de la vida lograron que, ¡oh casualidad!, hace apenas unos días corra la noticia de que muchas de esas copias, que supuestamente habían sido pulverizadas, aparezcan milagrosamente a la venta. O mejor aún, si se quiere, después que la hija de un ex directivo de la Warner Bros., tras revisar unas cajas que tenía en el armario de su habitación, se topara recientemente con dos cajas tamaño LP con el sello de la discográfica cerradas que, entre vinilo y vinilo, incluían cinco muestras impecables del “Black Album”, para acto seguido contactar a un tal Jeff Gold (ex vicepresidente de la compañía, hoy día a cargo del sitio de memorabilia Record Mecca) y, tras interiorizarlo del notable hallazgo, descubrir el alto costo de cada una de ellas, basándose en la cifra a la que llegó a venderse en Discogs por aquel entonces.
4Gold terminó pidiéndole tres de las cinco piezas descubiertas, las mismas que, claro, se vendieron como pan caliente en días sucesivos. “Se trata simplemente de uno de los discos más raros del mundo, si no es el más raro de todos”, afirmó un afortunado Gold tras la pronta adquisición y su eventual despacho.“Al comienzo pensé que se trataba de un disco falso, pero uno no podía saberlo hasta abrirlo e inspeccionarlo”… Pero una vez que se contactó con alguien a quien conocía de sus días en la Warner Bros., quien le confirmó su autenticidad, logró llegar a la conclusión de que se trataba de un material absolutamente genuino.
Ahora que Gold (lo del apellido es pura casualidad) logró apoderarse de varias copias del inhallable disco, trasladó su obsesión a otro disco del artista que, según confirmó, es aún más difícil de encontrar. “Hace poco se vendieron dos copias de prueba de ‘Camille’, otro trabajo inédito de Prince, y a un precio exorbitante. No se sabe mucho del disco, supongo que es algo que el mismo Prince imprimió…No lo hicieron los de la Warner Bros. Ninguno de mis ex-compañeros del sello saben algo de él. Pero si estás buscando discos que hayan sido completados, el ‘Black Album’ está en la cima de la lista de los más raros del mundo”, concluyó. Por lo que ya sabés qué es lo que tenés que hacer. Todavía quedan dos copias disponibles a la venta aquí en Record Mecca, si es que esos familiares están dispuestos a darte una mano, ahora que ya te decidiste a sacrificar toda una vida de vacaciones, y antes que tu esposa contacte al abogado para iniciar los trámites de divorcio.

DISCOANÁLISIS: LOS INTERMINABLES STONES Y SUS TRES AÑOS “EN EL AIRE”

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 9 de diciembre de 2017

edición deluxePACIENTE: Rolling Stones “On Air” (Interscope, 2017)

HISTORIA CLÍNICA: Ahora que las bóvedas del tiempo finalmente se dignaron a parir, ahora que el reloj que no para de girar sigue acrecentando el pasado minuto a minuto, los Rolling Stones finalmente editaron uno de los lanzamientos más esperados de sus -hasta ahora- más de 55 años de carrera. Y no sólo para regocijo de sus fans. “On Air” viene a cumplir ese objetivo tan largamente soñado, llenando uno de los tantos huecos que también habían quedado pendientes en la vastísima historia del rock y la música popular: editar oficialmente las sesiones de radio registradas para la BBC durante las etapas más prematuras de la banda.

Si ya lo habían hecho los Beatles en 1994, o Led Zeppelin tres años después (tan sólo por nombrar las más recordadas), ¿qué esperaban los Stones para decidirse a brindarle oficialmente al público parte de todas esas grabaciones seminales y formativas? Con seguridad, mucho habrá tenido que ver el éxito logrado con “Blue & Lonesome”, su más reciente trabajo de estudio, una colección de covers de blues registrados de manera cruda y directa en apenas un puñado de días, lanzado en diciembre del año pasado y que terminó tomándolos por sorpresa. “Ya estoy esperando a que salga el segundo volumen”, sugirió Keith Richards al respecto en aquellos días. Y entonces todo podría indicar que tal vez ésta sea la respuesta a semejante interrogante. Indiscutiblemente esa secuela a la que Richards aludía está representada por “On Air”. Si “Blue & Lonesome” nos mostraba a los Stones rindiéndole tributo a la música que los inspiró originalmente, el nuevo disco -que presenta material muy antiguo, paradójicamente- representa el primer lanzamiento legítimo de material en estudio y en vivo que el grupo grabó para la BBC entre 1963 y 1965, en instancias en que su ascenso a la fama comenzaba a dar señales más certeras, y también marcando aquel antes de que la sociedad compositiva de Mick Jagger y Keith Richard (que por entonces usaba su apellido sin la “s” original) comenzara a dar frutos. Y con Brian Jones en la banda, claro.

“En el momento en que lo hicimos, nos dijimos ‘¡Oh Dios mío, la BBC!’”, apuntó el guitarrista en una reciente entrevista para el diario L.A. Times. “Sólo queríamos ocultar el terror auténtico que teníamos. Había muchísima adrenalina”. Y a los hechos nos remitimos, entonces. Por aquellos años, el gobierno británico había instruido a las transmisoras que los artistas grabasen canciones diferentes para las emisoras de radio y de TV, o bien que las registren en vivo. Pero lo que podía ser una tarea extra para quienes tenían que someterse a esa política estatal, que claramente no formaba parte de sus agendas, acabó siendo una gran oportunidad para dejar una buena cantidad de nuevas tomas de muchos de sus grandes éxitos para la posteridad, o versionando canciones que, de otra manera, jamás hubieran alcanzado el vinilo. “La BBC quería que formemos parte de todo eso, y realmente no sabíamos por qué, o qué estábamos haciendo”, agregó Keith. “Tocábamos blues en bares, pero entonces metimos un disco en el Top 10, y de repente éramos la otra alternativa a los Beatles… Dios los bendiga. Lo primero que recuerdo sobre mi encuentro con la BBC es el tipo que estaba a cargo de controlar los micrófonos. Tenía un bigote enorme, como si fuera un oficial de la Fuerza Aérea Real británica, que me dijo ‘Si llegás a tocar ese micrófono, te decapito’. De todas formas yo no tenía idea de qué es lo que iba a hacer con el micrófono, pero tampoco es que él la tuviera mucho más que nosotros”.

ROLLING-LIBROAnticipado por un libro con un título de características similares titulado “Rolling Stones On Air In The Sixties: TV and Radio History As It Happened”, que detalla las presentaciones en radio y TV del grupo de 1963 hasta 1969, editado en noviembre, “On Air” (el vinilo, de tapa naranja) fue lanzado mundialmente el pasado 2 de diciembre, reuniendo 18 canciones -a las que se agrega una edición deluxe con 16 más, de cubierta amarilla, y una tercera en vinilo doble del mismo color- todas ellas registradas en sesiones de radio para distintos shows que integraban la programación de la BBC desde 1963 a 1965 (“Saturday Club”, “Top Gear”, “Rhythm And Blues” y “The Joe Loss Pop Show”, entre otros), de las cuales ocho nunca fueron registradas o editadas comercialmente. Para la ocasión, todas las tomas fueron sometidas a un proceso de remasterización especial bautizado “separación de fuente de audio”, en el que los ingenieros de los estudios Abbey Road contratados para realizar el proyecto se encargaron de que cada porción del audio radial (esto es, voces e instrumentación) fuera separada de la mezcla original para luego ser reconstruidas y remezcladas en conjunto, de esa forma logrando un sonido final con más sustancia. Los resultados pueden llegar a ser llamativos para quienes escuchen las pistas por primera vez, pero no tanto para aquellos que conozcan la sesionografía de los Stones más en profundidad. ¿El motivo? Todas las canciones que integran “On Air” ya habían visto la luz en decenas de bootlegs (ediciones piratas, no oficiales) desde al menos mediados de la década del 70. Nada nuevo para ellos, entonces, salvo la leve pero no menos sustancial mejora en la calidad del sonido, 50 y pico de años después, remasterizado para la edición que nos compete.

“Cuando escucho las canciones”, continúa Richards, “siento que hay mucha energía y entusiasmo, y me dan ganas de ponerme a remixarlas. Pero en esa época no se remezclaban. Uno pensaba –creía, habiendo sido criado en Londres- que la BBC sabía lo que hacía. Y después cuando nos grababan allí uno descubría que no tenían la menor idea de cómo grabar a un grupo así. En aquellos shows uno no tenía noción de lo que los micrófonos estaban captando, y de cómo se iba a escuchar después en la radio. Sólo esperábamos que saliera lo mejor posible. Escuchándolas ahora, pienso que capturaron el espíritu de todo. Podría ponerme a discutir si Brian sonaba muy alto, o no, pero fuera de esas cosas, creo que es un disco fascinante” Y así lo demuestra la mayor parte del material incluido, aún cuando los expertos más avezados, aquellos ya familiarizados con las canciones gracias a esas grabaciones inéditas que habían circulado muchos años antes, puedan llegar a descubrir que las versiones de “Hi Heel Sneakers” y “Ain’t That Loving You Baby” no están completas, lo que podría ser una buena pregunta para los ingenieros detrás del proyecto. Muchas de las canciones suenan realmente oscuras, por lo que la comparación con las tomas que aparecieron originalmente en los piratas pueda resultar apenas simbólica (como en el caso de “Walking The Dog”, grabada para el programa “Saturday Club” de 1964), mientras que en “Little By Little”, del mismo año, la calidad del sonido es muy cristalina. Tanto o más que el sonido del bajo de Bill Wyman, o sus coros junto a Richard(s) y Jones, que marcan una gran diferencia respecto a los de las versiones que antes habían visto la luz extraoficialmente. Otras directamente pierden las introducciones originales de los anunciadores radiales, como en el maravilloso cover de Bo Diddley “Cops And Robbers”. Y agreguemos un detalle más: el listado de las pistas tampoco aparece en orden cronológico. Como dato de color, “On Air” cierra con el único instrumental grabado alguna vez por los Stones: “2120 South Michigan Avenue”, un homenaje deliberado a la dirección física de los legendarios estudios Chess de Chicago, acaso la factoría primordial de las canciones que inspiraron al grupo a convertirse en el fenómeno definitivo que fueron, son y, eventualmente, serán por siempre.

edición comúnDIAGNÓSTICO: Nos encontramos con los Rolling Stones en su formación original con Brian Jones entre 1963 y 1965, en el período comprendido entre su homónimo álbum debut y “Out Of Our Heads”, cuando apenas promediaban los 25 años de edad. Aquí está finalmente la primera de las piezas que faltaba para empezar a completar oficialmente el álbum de figuritas perdidas de la banda, y auspiciosamente agregarán otros lanzamientos en la misma línea en un futuro, esperemos, muy cercano… Crucemos los dedos sin culpa, mientras tanto. El tiempo seguramente seguirá estando de su lado.

LISTA DE CANCIONES (versión original)
1. “Come On” (Saturday Club, 26 de octubre de 1963)
2. “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” (Saturday Club, 18 de septiembre de 1965)
3. “Roll Over Beethoven” (Saturday Club, 26 de octubre de 1963)
4. “The Spider And The Fly” (Yeah Yeah, 30 de agosto de 1965)
5. “Cops And Robbers” (Blues in Rhythm, 9 de mayo de 1964)
6. “It’s All Over Now” (The Joe Loss Pop Show, 17 de julio de 1964)
7. “Route 66” (Blues in Rhythm, 9 de mayo de 1964)
8. “Memphis, Tennessee” (Saturday Club, 26 de octubre de 1963
9.”Down The Road Apiece” (Top Gear, 6 de marzo de 1965)
10. “The Last Time” (Top Gear, 6 de marzo de 1965)
11. “Cry To Me” (Saturday Club, 18 de septiembre de 1965)
12. “Mercy, Mercy” (Yeah Yeah, 30 de agosto de 1965)
13. “Oh! Baby (We Got A Good Thing Goin’)” (Saturday Club, 18 de septiembre de 1965)
14. “Around And Around” (Top Gear, 23 de julio de 1964)
15. “Hi Heel Sneakers” (Saturday Club, 18 de abril de 1964)
16. “Fannie Mae” (Saturday Club, 18 de septiembre de 1965)
17. “You Better Move On” (Blues in Rhythm, 9 de mayo de 1964)
18. “Mona” (Blues In Rhythm, 9 de mayo de 1964)

CANCIONES EXTRA (edición de lujo)
19. “I Wanna Be Your Man” (Saturday Club, 8 de febrero de 1964)
20. “Carol” (Saturday Club, 18 de abril de 1964)
21. “I’m Moving On” (The Joe Loss Pop Show, 10 de abril de 1964)
22. “If You Need Me” (The Joe Loss Pop Show, 17 de julio de 1964)
23. “Walking The Dog” (Saturday Club, 8 de febrero de 1964)
24. “Confessin’ The Blues” (The Joe Loss Pop Show, 17 de Julio de 1964)
25. “Everybody Needs Somebody To Love” (Top Gear, 6 de marzo de 1965)
26. “Little By Little” (The Joe Loss Pop Show, 10 de abril de 1964)
27. “Ain’t That Loving You Baby” (Rhythm And Blues, 31 de octubre de 1964)
28. “Beautiful Delilah” (Saturday Club, 18 de abril de 1964)
29. “Crackin’ Up” (Top Gear, 23 de julio de 1964)
30. “I Can’t Be Satisfied” (Top Gear, 23 de Julio de 1964)
31. “I Just Want to Make Love To You” (Saturday Club, 18 de abril de 1964)
32. “2120 South Michigan Avenue” (Rhythm and Blues, 31 de octubre de 1964)

 

CONCIERTOS: CHRIS JAGGER, EL HERMANO DE MICK, MOSTRÓ SU FOLK & BLUES EN BUENOS AIRES JUNTO A CHARLIE HART

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 26 de noviembre de 2017

Chris Jagger y Charlie Hart en Mr. Jones Blues Pub, Ramos Mejía – 21/11/2017

portada1
Que sí, que no. Que sí, que no. Lo que podría interpretarse a priori como un diálogo histérico es apenas el código madre que subyace detrás de la chance de este periodista de entrevistar a Chris Jagger en Inglaterra el año pasado. Son cosas que ocurren cuando uno conoce accidentalmente a un amigo íntimo del músico en cuestión, y éste nos pone en contacto. Fiel a su estilo incansable de girar por Europa y Oceanía, coordinar una entrevista con un artista por demás particular (y muy lejos de aquello de “el hermano menor de Mick”, apenas justificado por la portación de apellido) se tornaba cada vez más remoto. Cuando Chris podía, no me daban los tiempos para acercarme hasta el área del condado de Somerset, donde residía por entonces. La última oportunidad iba a darse cuando él se acercara a la capital británica, pero para entonces uno ya tenía pasaje de regreso a la bendita tierra donde le tocó nacer. “OK Chris, quedará para otra ocasión”, le confesé, dubitativo. “¿Y si la hacemos por Skype?”, me sugirió como última chance, momentos antes de manifestarle mis preferencias por hacerla en vivo y en directo, en lo posible. Por eso resultó toda una sorpresa cuando hace unos meses volví a recibir un mail suyo asegurándome que hacia fines de año vendría a Sudamérica para realizar alguna fecha en el país, y también en Brasil.

QUE SÍ, QUE NO, QUE NI. Todo indicaba que el tiempo se había encargado de alinear los planetas. Claro que los hechos que se diluyeron una vez más cuando, hace apenas un mes y medio atrás, el último 9 de octubre, me lo crucé súbitamente en vivo y en directo en el vip del show de los Stones en Düsseldorf, deseándole lo mejor para su (ahora sí) futuro arribo a Buenos Aires, y al cual se refirió actualizándome que “al final no voy a tocar en Argentina, pero sí voy a estar en Brasil”. Que no, que no, otra vez que no… Por eso me resultó aún más inesperado cundo al pasado martes 21 de noviembre alguien me informó que esa misma noche se iba a estar presentando en un club de blues de Ramos Mejía.

IMG_3006 (Medium)

Desbordado de escepticismo, no acepté la veracidad del hecho antes de ver la confirmación del show en su página oficial, la cual, de no haber pasado por semejante mar de contradicciones anteriormente, más que seguro hubiera chequeado con antelación. Y como si todo esto fuera poco, Chris no sólo iba a tocar esa noche en la ciudad, sino que además lo iba a hacer acompañado del gran Charlie Hart. Que sí, que sí, y que sí, definitivamente, cuando pasadas las 23 hs., en medio de un recinto colmado de adeptos (de claro tinte stoniano, los mismos que posiblemente en su mayoría se hayan acercado por simple curiosidad y adhesión a la causa), el dúo apareció en el escenario del Mr. Jones Blues Pub para agasajar a los allí presentes con tonadas directamente de la cepa más pura del folk inglés e irlandés, empapadas de blues de Louisiana, de country, de cajun, de zydeco, y de otros estilos regionales que suelen abordar . En definitiva, lo que Chris viene haciendo tozudamente desde su álbum debut de 1973 “You Know The Name But Not the Face” (también conocido como “Chris Jagger”, editado bajo es título al año siguiente), y agregando 11 en su discografía hasta su más reciente trabajo “All The Best”, lanzado este mismísimo año.

IMG_3273 (Medium)

LOS HERMANOS SEAN UNIDOS (PERO POR SEPARADO). La experiencia de ver a Chris Jagger en vivo sugiere el previo intento de olvidarse de su célebre apelllido para comprobar que, más allá del hecho de ser el único hermano del performer definitivo de rock and roll en tiempo y espacio que el mundo conocerá (literalmente), y de la enorme montaña de ego a la que Sir Mick nunca pudo dejar de subirse, la figura y personalidad de “el otro Jagger” no está menos que en las antípodas. Es que Chris nunca perteneció al mundo del espectáculo per se, resultando ser aquel tipo de extremísimo bajo perfil que prefirió dedicarse a la música por el simple hecho de amarla, bien distanciado de las luminarias de rigor y optando por una carrera al tono que nada tuvo ni tiene de comercial, en el sentido estricto de la frase. Chris es hombre de shows en bares o en festivales pueblerinos, con sus raíces musicales irremediablemente enclavadas en su tierra natal, y campo adentro. A lo largo de su existencia, su parentesco con el frontman de los Stones apenas se limitó a participaciones aisladas de su hermano Mick en alguna canción suelta de sus trabajos, o a cierta colaboración en conjunto para algún proyecto benéfico.

IMG_3294 (Medium)

HAVE A HART. No resulta casual entonces que la canción elegida para abrir el show haya sido “Will Ya Won’t Ya?” (del álbum “Atcha” de 1994, en la que su hermano de sangre aparecía haciendo coros), dejando en claro el sabor de la propuesta musical que se iba a extender durante las casi 15 canciones que formarían parte del show en el que Chris, exclusivamente tocando guitarra acústica, a la que sólo abandonó circunstancialmente para pasarse a la armónica, terminarían conformando una oferta singular e inolvidable. Menos aún lo fue la vital presencia del legendario Charlie Hart secundándolo (en piano, violín, acordeón y coros) como único y principal escudero en su misión conjunta: plasmar un repertorio rico de sabores folk y derivados en el que sólo faltó un niño corriendo por la campiña inglesa. Los más melómanos, por su parte, probablemente hayan fijado más su atención en Hart y la extensa carrera que lo consagró: tocó y/o grabó con Alexis Korner, Chris Spedding, Ian Dury, Eric Clapton, Townshend, entre tantos, más aún recordado como miembro estable de Ronnie Lane’s Slim Chance, la banda formada por el ex-Faces tras desertar del grupo de Stewart, Wood y Cía., e incluso más tarde siendo director musical del show tributo al difunto Lane en el Albert Hall londinense… Era una noche estelar en el corazón del oeste de Buenos Aires, entonces, y sin desperdicio.

1

CASTELLANO PARA PRINCIPIANTES. Tras más de un intento de esbozar algunas palabras en español (que por momentos terminaron en un forzado y agradable italiano), el menor de los Jagger continuó con “The Libido Blues”, antes de continuar con el repertorio de lo más destacado de su carrera (“If You Love Her”, “Lazy Says”, “On The Road”, “Funky Man”, “Lhasa Town”, en cuya versión original de estudio contó con la participación de David Gilmour) o en la versión de la canción de Ray Charles “Let’s Go Get Stoned”, y que a la hora de versionar clásicos de blues estricto como “Key To The Highway” o “Baby, Scratch My Back” agregó la participación extra del legendario bajista y sesionista Bob Stroger (Jimmy Rogers, Otis, Rush, etc.), que hacía menos de una semana se había presentado en el mismo tablado en otra de sus tantas visitas al país, y que ahora, sin más y a sus dulces 87 años de edad, se sumó al carismático dúo de Jagger y Hart, en un show que debería entrar en la categoría local de “histórico”.

2

UNA NOCHE PARA EL RECUERDO. Por ser su primera presentación de la historia en tierras locales, y más aún por su alta performance artística, coronada por el festejo de casi todos los allí presentes que no titubearon a la hora de acercarse a saludarlo una vez finalizada la celebración, selfies y autógrafos incluidos, para calzarse el sombrero y retirarse a disfrutar de un merecido descanso (antes habían abordado un largo vuelo desde Nueva Zelanda, aprestándose al día siguiente a partir a Brasil para realizar allí tres fechas más)… Mención aparte para el Mr. Jones Blues Pub, recinto que los albergó, y que constituyó el marco indicado y a la altura perfecta de las circunstancias para una noche que deberá ser recordada como especial. Que se repita entonces. Y que sí, que vuelva a repetirse otra vez también.

Agradecimientos:
Rogelio Rugilo
Carlos Costa (fotos)

HOMENAJES: MALCOLM YOUNG (1953-2017), ADIÓS AL PEQUEÑO GRAN ROCKER

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 20 de noviembre de 2017

Una remera sin mangas, un jean gastado (de esos que lo llevaron a uno a pensar que era el mismo que usaba siempre) y una guitarra que prácticamente superaba los 1,60 m. de estatura de quien estaba colgada. Y mucha actitud, claro, en cantidades industriales. Esos acaban siendo los elementos que, sin mucho más que agregar, podrían definir el ADN de Malcolm Young, la pieza primordial de la maquinaria de AC/DC desde que el grupo arribó ruidosamente a la escena del espectáculo allá por 1973. Hechos de dinamita pura (o de T.N.T, si es que el lector considera al término más oportuno) Y un traje de colegial para su hermano Angus, claro.

1

MALCOLM, EL TODO Y LAS PARTES. Pocos músicos de rock tuvieron el destacado honor de lograr la condecoración de riffmasters (“maestros del riff”) como el pequeño gran Malcolm pudo plasmar en su instrumento. Tal vez sobren los dedos de una mano, sólo quizás. Keith Richards, Tony Iommi y algún que otro más que ahora no me viene a la cabeza. Tampoco es que sienta muchas ganas de ponerme a recordarlos tras el estupor causado por la reciente muerte de uno de los ocho hermanos de la camada Young a la que pertenecen. A pesar de su extensa carrera, Malcolm podría ser considerado el último que llegó a alcanzar a un podio tan prodigioso. Porque si su hermano Angus resulta ser la cara más visible de la banda, estéticamente hablando, Malcolm, el hombre pequeño que casi pasaba desapercibido en escena, escudado en su enorme guitarra Gretsch G6131 (más popularmente conocida como Jet Firebird), termina siendo el alma y corazón de una de las bandas más fundamentales del género. Una vieja gacetilla de Atlantic Records, la discográfica a la que históricamente pertenecieron los Young y Cía., lanzada en los primeros años de carrera del eléctrico combo, no titubeó en presentarlo ante la prensa como “no sólo un gran guitarrista y compositor de canciones, sino también alguien con una visión: Malcolm es quien planifica todo en AC/DC. Y también es el tipo tranquilo de la banda, profundo e intensivamente consciente de todo”.

2

AC/CB (CHUCK BERRY). Digámoslo así: si Malcolm hubiera nacido 20 años antes, y no aquel 6 de enero de 1953 (más precisamente en Glasgow, Escocia), su capacidad creativa -pendenciera, honestamente cruda, y llena de originalidad- lo hubiera puesto a la altura de quienes siempre habían sido sus ídolos musicales: Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, o los músicos de blues del Delta. Que por esa vueltas de la vida (y sólo porque tocaban muy fuerte, o porque más tarde coincidieran con la época en que la escena del rock marchaba a paso firme a lo largo y ancho del planeta) AC/DC haya sido considerado un “grupo de hard rock”, o incluso “de heavy”, más allá del disparate, responde meramente a un error técnico. AC/DC es Chuck Berry enchufado a mil voltios, con sendos toques de blues no menos electrificados, y con una pared de Marshalls para sostener la descarga. Títulos como “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap”, “Let There Be Rock”, “Highway To Hell”, “Back in Black, “Whole Lotta Rosie, “Riff Raff”, “High Voltage”, “That’s The Way I Wanna Rock’n’Roll”, “Live Wire”, “Thunderstruck”… en fin, simplemente estamos hablando de todos esos riffs irremplazables que salieron de las manos del pequeño diablillo detrás de AC/DC, para terminar convirtiéndose en himnos del rock en su exacta medida. “Bueno, los grupos de rock realmente no tienen swing, apuntó cierta vez. “Pero el rock’n’roll sí lo tiene. Lo que pasa es que las bandas no comprenden eso del sentimiento, del movimiento…”

EL NEGRO LES SIENTA BIEN. Como a muchos que promedian la edad de quien aquí escribe, a mí me tocó descubrir a los australianos gracias al álbum “Back In Black”. Para entonces, algún que otro video del disco ya había logrado colarse en los pocos, qué digo, escasísimos espacios de la televisión local allá por 1980. Estaba el de “Hell’s Bells”, y el del que le daba título al disco… A decir verdad, esos dos enanos que se sacudían espásticamente sobre el escenario me tuvieron obsesionado durante un buen tiempo. Estaban las fotos que aparecían en las revistas, claro, pero no alcanzaba. Por tal motivo hubo una mañana de sábado de ese mismo año en que me tomé el colectivo, me bajé en Paraguay y Florida, y me dirigí a una disquería de importados que estaba en la Galería Del Sol para hacerme del LP, recién llegadito del exterior. ¿Qué era esa tapa negra y por qué motivo las letras que aparecían sobre ésta eran del mismo color, casi ilegibles? Todo pasó a segundo plano desde que puse el disco en casa por primera vez, aún cuando no tenía mejor equipamiento para reproducirlo que el viejo tocadiscos Winco de la familia (con un solo parlante incrustado en el mismísimo aparto, y sin siquiera parlantes exteriores). Pero nada podía impedir que lo salía de allí fuera encantador: a mí me encantaba ese sonido. Los chirridos de Brian Johnson todavía no habían llegado a perturbarme tanto como lo lograrían con el correr de los años (paralelamente sin nunca dejar de lamentar la muerte del gran Bon Scott, la primera baja en la historia de la banda), pero uno pagaba el precio que tenía que pagar con la condición de poder disfrutar de aquellos mágicos riffs de los hermanos Young, que no paraban de embrujarme. Algunos años más tarde tendríamos la posibilidad de ir al cine a ver “Let There Be Rock”, así saldando el recóndito deseo de poder verlos en vivo, si bien en una pantalla, mucho antes de su desembarco en vivo y en directo en el país décadas después.

4

GUITARRA, VAS A LLORAR. Malcolm Young no necesitaba morirse para convertirse en músico “de culto”. Su importancia es tal que ya se había ganado los laureles en vida. Ni siquiera su problemas de salud que fueron de la adicción al alcohol hasta la demencia, situación que lo obligó a abandonar la banda hace algo más de 3 años, hubieran logrado impedir la distinción. Nos quedamos sin el chico de la remera sin mangas, el de los eternos pantalones gastados, y hay una guitarra Gretsch G6131, la misma de la cual salieron algunos de los mejores riffs de la historia del rock and roll, que llora desconsoladamente porque su dueño no va a poder volver a tocarla.

CLÁSICOS: LA INCREÍBLE HISTORIA DE “LOUIE, LOUIE”, LA CANCIÓN QUE RESURGIÓ DE SUS CENIZAS

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 24 de noviembre de 2017

Si la tradición que reza que las canciones triunfantes generan enormes cantidades de dinero se cumpliera al pie de la letra, si desde el vamos auspiciara un futuro rico y promisorio, entonces la historia de Richard Berry, el autor de la mítica “Louie, Louie”, a quien el destino le jugó una maniática pasada -componer una de las canciones más exitosas de todos los tiempos, para luego presenciar cómo otros se llevaban los laureles y sus tremendos dividendos- deliberadamente podría desafiar la regla y sin titubeo alguno.

1Remontándose algo más atrás, los primeros pasos artísticos de Berry datan de los días de The Flairs, una agrupación de doo-wop de Los Angeles de inicios de la década del 50 que, si bien sus miembros no habían logrado apuntalar ninguna de sus composiciones en los rankings de aquellos años, en determinado momento tuvieron la suerte de cruzarse a la insigne dupla de compositores y productores Jerry Leiber y Mike Stoller. Si bien para 1954 Berry ya se había embarcado en una carrera en solitario junto a su nueva banda The Pharaohs, al mismo tiempo en que escribía para otros artistas, Leiber y Stoller le ofrecieron sumar su voz a la grabación de la canción “Riot in Cell Block #9” de The Robins (los que más tarde se convertirían en los celebrados The Coasters), y algo después en la triunfante “The Wallflower (Dance With Me, Henry)” de la cantante de blues Etta James (de hecho, el primer gran éxito de ésta)

NACE UNA LEYENDA… EN EL BAÑO. Así, Berry comenzó a abrir shows para los chicanos Rick Rillera and the Rhythm Rockers en las noches en que el cuasi ignoto combo se presentaba en la ciudad de Anaheim, en California, lo que lo hizo interesarse por una de las canciones de la agrupación, llamada “El Loco Cha Cha” (de la autoría de René Touzet), con la cual Berry solía maravillarse mientras los escuchaba tocarla domingo tras domingo. Su fascinación por la canción, de claro ritmo latino, lo llevó paulatinamente a inspirarse para componer lo que más tarde se convertiría en uno de los sucesos más grandes de la historia discográfica del siglo pasado. Acto seguido Berry pergeñó “Louie, Louie” sin más recursos que la de la tonada de los Rhythm Rockers que lo tenía encandilado, y el de un pedazo de papel higiénico que rescató del baño del lugar para escribir las primeras estrofas de la canción (!), asegurándose de que música y letra no abandonen su cabeza.

En realidad el autor utilizó las notas de “El Loco…” para componer únicamente el riff principal de su obra prima (si bien las primeras notas de “Louie, Louie” resultan curiosamente bastante similares a las de la canción de los chicanos), a su vez sumando un abanico de influencias que iban desde Nat King Cole y su “Calypso Blues”, y “Havana Moon” de Chuck Berry (el otro Berry, con el cual, dicho sea de paso, no guardaba ningún tipo de parentesco, y que también mezclaba ritmos de calipso con rhythm and blues), lo que terminó convirtiendo a “Louie, Louie” en una suerte de balada de tipo jamaiquina. Para la letra, por su parte, Richard Berry se inspiró en “One For My Baby (And One More for the Road)” del compositor americano Johnny Mercer, que también hablaba de un joven que le contaba sus historias con las chicas a un barman que lo escuchaba pacientemente.

LOUIE LOUIE, UN ÉXITO POR MONEDITAS. A la hora de su lanzamiento comercial, “Louie, Louie” apareció en la cara B del simple de “You Are My Sunshine”. Originalmente Berry supuso que ésta iba a ser la que iba a lograr difusión, pero el suceso que obtuvó “Louie, Louie”, esencialmente gracias a la ayuda de un DJ de Los Angeles que no dejaba de hacerla rotar, superó sus propias expectativas, llegando a convertirse en la canción favorita de la movida de bandas de garage rock (o “rock de garaje”, aquel termino que refiere a ciertos grupos que solían ensayar en los garajes de sus casas, sobre todo los de la costa oeste de los Estados Unidos), pero más que nada en la canción que más amaban los Kingsmen, que provenían de Portland, Oregon. Enloquecidos por su melodía tras escuchar la versión registrada por un tal Rockin’ Robin Roberts (tanto como cierta vez lo había estado Berry por aquella de Rick Rillera and the Rhythm Rockers), los Kingsmen no perdieron tiempo y salieron a grabarla, para finalmente editarla en el mes de agosto de 1963. Probablemente lo que los Kingsmen desconocían era que con el lanzamiento del single estaban escribiendo una de las páginas más llamativas de la historia del rock and roll, más exactamente desde el momento en que su versión de “Louie, Louie” alcanzara el segundo puesto de las listas de ventas de discos pop en la revista Billboard, donde además permanecería por seis semanas seguidas. Tristemente, para entonces Berry había perdido toda soberanía sobre los derechos de publicación, tras haberlos vendido en 1959 al sello Flip Records a cambio de U$750, lo cual hoy podría parecer una suma insignificante, pero que en aquel momento no estuvo nada mal para un artista que pujaba por convertirse en un “creador de hits” y que vislumbraba que su carrera apuntaba a la nada misma.

Produced by AMI Production Group

Asimismo Berry se encontraba en planes de contraer matrimonio, por lo que la suma no le vino nada mal al autor, dada la coyuntura. Pero indudablemente mucho menos que lo que, en rigor, se estaba perdiendo, desde el instante en que la versión de los Kingsmen, con sus características tan singulares de sonido, alcanzó una repercusión tremenda, la misma que ni él, ni el sello grabador, podrían haber imaginado alguna vez. Eventualmente, a la hora registrar lo que más tarde se convertiría en su tema insignia, los Kingsmen optaron por dejar atrás el sonido dulzón de la toma original del autor, para reemplazarlo con un estilo de pista vocal muy diferente y con una letra prácticamente imposible de descifrar, todo gracias a la voz de Joe Ely, el cantante, cuyo micrófono en el estudio durante aquella jornada de grabación estuvo colgado del techo de la sala, por lo que no le quedó más remedio que ponerse en puntas de pie (!) mientras se esmeraba en vocalizar, elevando su tono un poco más arriba de lo que acostumbraba, para así evitar que lo tape el sonido del resto de los instrumentos. “Más que cantar, grité”, declararía Ely al respecto. Y por si todo esto fuera poco, el vocalista de los Kingsmen además venía de pasar por una sesión de ortodoncia, que lo obligó a grabar la canción con aparatos en sus dientes (!!).

the kingsmen

The Kingsmen

EL FBI EN ACCIÓN. La controversia sobre “Louie, Louie” también acabaría involucrando al mismísimo FBI, cuyas autoridades, con el mero objetivo de descifrar lo que Ely cantaba, llegaron a designar un equipo especial de oficiales ordenados a pasar largas horas escuchando la canción, lo que finalmente los llevó a decidir que resultaba “incomprensible a cualquier velocidad en que se la escuche” y sin dejar de tildarla de “indecente”. Para colmo de todos los males, Berry, ya alejado de su composición, desconocía por completo que los Kingsmen la habían registrado, escuchándola por primera vez recién a los tres meses de su lanzamiento e incluso teniendo que lidiar con la injusta tarea de soportar a diario a la gente que se le acercaba para comentarle que la letra de su canción era “absolutamente incomprensible”.

Así y todo nada impidió que este se transformara en uno de los hits más duraderos de la historia del rock, principalmente a partir de 1978 cuando formó parte de la desopilante comedia “Animal House” (protagonizada por el inolvidable John Belushi, de cuya conexión con el rock hablamos alguna vez en MADHOUSE) y terminando luego por aparecer en decenas de bandas de sonido y recopilaciones varias, sin dejar de mencionar las cerca de 2000 versiones grabadas por una larguísima lista de intérpretes que incluyó, sólo por nombrar a las más recordadas, a las de Paul Revere & The Raiders, Otis Redding, Iggy Pop, The Kinks, Ike & Tina Turner, The Clash, Toots & Maytals, The Beach Boys, The Byrds, Motörhead, Joan Jett, Stanley Clarke and George Duke, The Cramps, The Cult, Sisters of Mercy, Barry White, Dave Matthews Band , Johnny Winter, Ace Frehley y hasta David McCallum (¡sí, el rubio Illya Kuryakin de “El Agente de C.I.P.O.L.”!).

4

UN COOLER PARA EL LADO DE LA JUSTICIA. Semejante e injusto giro del destino acabó llevando al pobre de Richard Berry al más oscuro de los ostracismos, refugiándose en la casa de su madre en el barrio South Central de Los Angeles, no precisamente una de las zonas más seguras de la ciudad californiana. Y fue el mismo destino que, un puñado de años más tarde, realizaría un giro de 180 grados y llevaría a California Coolers, una legendaria firma de bebidas que quiso utilizar “Louie, Louie” para un comercial de TV, a descubrir que no podían hacerlo sin la autorización previa del autor de la canción, por lo que uno de los abogados representantes de la firma tuvo que localizar al olvidado Berry. Ante la eventual posibilidad de que le inicie acciones a la marca en caso de utilizarla sin permiso, California Coolers no tuvo más remedio que acabar pagando por su uso, lo que sumado a la investigación de la Sociedad de Derechos de los Artistas de los EE.UU. (que determinó que el autor había sido privado ilegalmente de millones de dólares en regalías tras el correr de los años), terminó convirtiendo a Berry instantáneamente en millonario, sacándolo así del letargo del sofá del triste living de la casa de su madre en el cual había estado hundido para reencontrarse con su amada “Louie, Louie” y disfrutar merecidísimamente de las mieles de su consagrado éxito.

HALLAZGOS: LEAN AL MISMÍSIMO CHUCK BERRY COMO CRÍTICO DE PUNK, POP Y NEW WAVE (!)

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 23 de septiembre de 2017

Corría 1980 y el fanzine estadounidense Jet Lag había logrado lo que para otros resultaba una misión prácticamente imposible: obtener una entrevista con Chuck Berry. Se sabe, el “Padre del Rock’n’Roll” no era lo que se dice suficientemente afecto a ser reporteado y, cuando lo aceptaba, tras meses (o incluso años) de ardua negociación y decenas de llamadas de teléfono, mayormente solía hacerlo si los interesados en hablar con él eran medios masivos, o revistas especializadas en música en las que podía despacharse a gusto sobre su carrera y exponer una vez más su talentosísimo ego… No, a Berry no le gustaban las entrevistas. Motivos no le faltaban. A través de los años, fueron más las preguntas que apuntaban a que hable sobre su vida privada (la que contaba con varias páginas escandalosas), la comidilla ideal para muchos editores hambrientos de historias de prensa amarilla que podían tentar a sus morbosos lectores.

2
Berry prefería hablar sobre sus canciones, o incluso deslizar alguna posición política, pero nada de siquiera referirse de lejos a los asuntos de índole personal que tanto protegía. Por eso no opuso resistencia alguna a la propuesta de los miembros de la hoy extinta publicación Jet Lag, quienes desde el vamos contaban con la ventaja de pertenecer a St. Louis, la ciudad que había dado luz al entrevistado, y que eventualmente permitió que el objetivo sea más sencillo de alcanzar.Para entonces Berry ya había declarado su interés en la nueva música que iba apareciendo durante aquellos días, por los que los encargados del fanzine -que fiel a sus tiempos era redactado y editado de manera casera en una máquina de escribir, y luego fotocopiado para su circulación- terminaron haciendo que se olvide por un rato de su terquedad histórica y, tal como había manifestado, no se niegue a la posibilidad de opinar sobre las nuevas bandas de punk, pop y new wave que por entonces sonaban en la radio.

3
Apenas un lustro antes, a mediados de los 70, hordas de chicos con camperas de cuero y cabellos parados aterrizaban en la escena pregonando eso de dejar en el pasado a todos esos artistas establecidos alguna vez reconocidos como auténticos rebeldes (“Peligro, extraño/ Mejor pintate la cara/ Nada de Elvis, Beatles o Rolling Stones/ En 1977”, cantaban los Clash en la cara B de su single debut), pero Berry, que falleció el pasado 18 de marzo a los dulces 90 años de edad, lo sabía mejor que cualquiera: el rock’n’roll primitivo y el punk tenían muchísimo en común, y si bien apenas unos pocos lo reconocieron sin titubeos -sobre todo en el caso de los Ramones– fue el personaje central de la entrevista quien se explayó abiertamente, y por momentos también de manera muy graciosa, sobre aquel paralelismo entre esa nueva música y su propio trabajo, al que prácticamente no haya músico surgido en los últimos 60 años que no le deba algo. A continuación, la traducción de sus conceptos sobre distintas bandas (cuyos nombres aparecen con varios errores en el fanzine) y sus canciones, allá lejos y hace 37 años, con música incluida para los aquejados de deficiencia etaria… ¡o simple mala memoria!

SEX PISTOLS – “God Save The Queen”
“¿Por qué está tan enojado este tipo? Las guitarras y la progresión de la canción son iguales a las de las mías. Buen ritmo de fondo. No puedo entender todo lo que canta. Si estás loco, al menos hacele saber a la gente que es lo que te está enloqueciendo””.

THE CLASH – “Complete Control”
“Suena parecida a la anterior. El ritmo y las guitarras hacen un buen trabajo juntas. ¿El cantante estaba con dolor de garganta cuando la grabó?”

RAMONES – “Sheena Is A Punk Rocker”
“Una buena canción movediza. Estos tipos me recuerdan a cuando empecé, yo también sabía solamente tres acordes”

THE ROMANTICS – “What I Like About You”
20-20 – “Oh Cheri” (sic)
THE BEAT – “Different Kind Of Girl”
“¡Al fin algo para bailar! Suena mucho a los 60, con algunos de mis riffs de guitarra. ¿Vos decís que esto es algo nuevo? Escuché cosas así muchísimas veces. No entiendo por qué tanto alboroto…”

THE GLADIATORS – “Sweet So Still” (sic)
TOOTS AND THE MAYTALS – “Funky Kingston”
SELECTOR (sic) – “On The Radio” (sic)
“Esto es bueno, muy suave y conmovedor. Muy bueno para arrastrar los pies. Suena bastante parecido a mi viejo camarada Bo Diddley, pero un poco más lento. Una vez intenté hacer algo similar en una canción llamada ‘Havana Moon’”

DAVE EDMUNDS – “Queen Of Hearts”
“Esto está mejor. Este tipo tiene un verdadero toque para el rock and roll, una onda que le sale de adentro. ¿Ha tenido éxito? Bueno, si alguna vez necesita trabajo yo podría utilizarlo”

TALKING HEADS – “Psyco Killer” (sic)
“Una canción divertida, sin dudas. Me encanta la parte de bajo. Buena mezcla, y buen ritmo. El cantante suena como si tuviera pánico de salir a escena”

WIRE – “I Am The Fly”
JOY DIVISION – “Unknown Pleasures”
“Así que a esto le dicen ‘nuevo material’…No es nada que no haya escuchado antes. Suena como una de esas viejas zapadas de blues que B.B. King y Muddy Waters hacían en el backstage del viejo anfiteatro de Chicago. Los instrumentos serán distintos, pero es el mismo experimento”

WITH CHRIS KIMSEY, PRODUCER EXTRAORDINAIRE: “I LIKE THE PROCESS OF RECORDING, CREATING THE ATMOSPHERE, AND WORKING WITH A BAND ON TALKING ABOUT ARRANGEMENTS”

Estándar

The Four Steps. No, no numerical error involved here to refer to one of Hitchcock´s masterpieces, but it sure would serve as the title of this interview. That´s all it takes to get in one of the most significant landmark places in the history of popular music of at least the last 50 years. Four doorsteps, the only border that divides the world this side of life and the entrance to the Olympic building, located in the Barnes neighborhood, just across the Thames, perhaps the most legendary of all London recording studios alongside fellow Abbey Road. And also in the whole of England. Formerly established in 1906, first as theater of its own repertoire company under the name of Byfeld Hall, which ran until the end of the ‘50s, when it turned to a television studio, it was in 1965 that the Olympic Sound Studios firm decided to purchase it and thus give way to the most celebrated of his activities: that of independent recording studio, within its walls some of the most seminal sessions in the history of English rock and pop music took place. Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, the Stones, the Beatles, The Who, Bowie, Howlin ‘Wolf, Ray Charles, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Clapton, B.B. King, Ten Years After, Spooky Tooth,Barbra Streisand, Stevie Wonder, Roxy Music, Jethro Tull, Prince, Queen, Supertramp, Van Morrison, Thin Lizzy, Iggy Pop, Motörhead, The Yardbirds, Madonna, Oasis, Duran Duran… The list could go on and on, just to mention the main names. That´s how Olympic managed to set an unparalleled reputation that revolved around its axis composed by sound quality, technical excellence and unrivaled atmosphere, making it the place that led the cream of rock and pop on both sides of the Atlantic to agree that it was “the studio where we have to go to”.

1In January 2009 Olympic Studios shut down its doors for the first time ever, which led the British record industry to lose one of its most important recording spots. The building would later reopen at the end of 2013 under the name of Olympic Cinema, modifying its original geography to house two single movie theaters that featured hi-tech sound technology, also adding a restaurant, a café, and a room or gold members. But those four steps remained  the same as they did in the early days. The same ones that, with a few tiny interruptions here and there, Chris Kimsey has been crossing since 1969, when he was just a teenager with a slight amateur inclination towards the recording industry, landing in Olympic with the mere intention of finding a job to support his personal expenses.
Almost half a century later, that young fellow who was first given the job to serve tea to the employees and musicians who worked in the establishment, would eventually become one of the most renowned producers, mixers and sound engineers in music history.
MADHOUSE met Chris Kimsey in November last year right at the place that gave birth to his career nearly 50 years ago, like time hadn´t gone by at all and, again, beyond those same old four steps.

2My first question is about one of your most recent works , Thirsty´s ‘Albatross’ album, which I believe you enjoyed doing very much.
Yeah, that album’s getting some really good reviews actually.

I don’t have the albums, but I got to play them online. And I’m really happy about Guy Bailey.
Me too, it’s a great vehicle for him. I tried on quite a few occasions to get him involved with other things. He’s ok for the writing part but he doesn’t want to go and do it live. Which is a shame, actually… he does do some things live, like he did with the Peckham Cowboys, but it’s a shame, because he could teach a lot of kids a lot of stuff. But we get on really well, and I like his kind of approach and his voice. He recorded most of it in his bedroom. He has no regard for compressor or limiters, everything has to be up to 11, but it works, I like it, so it’s good fun.

You know, I like the Quireboys, but actually my two favourite albums of the band are the ones with Guy. They used to be more rock ’n’ roll before he left the band.
It’s a good combination that he writes the music, and the melodies, and he’s really good at lyrics too.

3

Thirsty´s debut album

You had a great time working with him since their very first album.
Yes, when was it, 4 years ago? And it’s good to see they got back together to do a second album as well.

But they don’t want to do it live.
Oh no, and that’s a bit of a problem. It’s got to be Guy, you can’t get someone else to play the guitar.

Yes, but when I interviewed him he told me he cannot do it because he also needs the guy from Squeeze, the drummer, who’s not always available.
Yeah, that’s true but I don’t know.

I must confess, Chris, you have such a great background, I don’t know what to start with.
Well it all starts in here! (laughs)

How long have you been working in the music industry and mainly how did it all start for you? I mean, you probably were like all of us, somebody who likes music. How did it all happen?
It started here in 1967, I got a job here as a tea boy. I didn’t know what was in these four walls. I just saw “Olympic Studios” outside. And before that, at school, I was involved with recording the music or sound effects for school plays, because I had a tape recorder. I had a tape recorder from a very… I had my first tape recorder when I was about 9 or 10. I used to love listening to film soundtracks and musicals, not rock and roll or anything like that, but more orchestral, my parents gave me a tape recorder, because you could buy pre-recorded 3 ¾ ips (inches per second) tapes of musicals and film music. Not vinyl, they didn’t have vinyl. So I was introduced to the tape recorder at a very early age, and that went on at school they would ask me to record if there was any sound effects, or any spoken word coming from the speaker, so I was involved with that. And that excited my ear about the fact that one could capture a sound on tape.

4

Olympic Sound Studios, in the ’60s

So you were basically “the music guy” at school.
I was the sound guy at school. And that actually went on because when I was 14, I was asked if I would like to go to a recording studio that was owned by the Inner London Education Authority, which was the school authority of the time. And they had a studio off Tottenham Court Road. I used to get on the tube from Morden to Tottenham Court Road, I think maybe twice a month, for the Saturday, to this school and the studio was tiny. It had a Vortexian four channel mixer which was just four volume knobs, and a stereo Ferrograph tape recorder it might have been mono actually. I got the bug there even more. And I was very fortunate because one of the first people that I recorded there was Dame Sybil Thorndike, who was a very famous celebrated actress at the time.  She was like Laurence Olivier in that area and I was recording her for a ‘Son et Lumiere’, a show that we had at my next school where I also had a tape recorder. And at this studio, this is quite fascinating, there was myself, and there was only one other student, a young student who is a couple of months older than me. He was from the East End of London, and I was from the South of London, and we both went to this studio on Saturdays, and his name is Ray Staff. Well Ray went on to become and is one of the best mastering engineers in the world. He runs Air Mastering. So he ended up getting into the music business. He started at Trident. So the two of us young kids we were recording various things, and the teacher who was running the program, he was a music teacher for the school, and he was a jazz musician, and one afternoon he said “when we finish, would you stay behind because I want to record my jazz trio?” So I stayed behind.

5

Actress Dame Sybil Thorndike, one of the first voices recorded by Kimsey

Because you were “the sound guy”
At 14 years old, I was “the sound guy”. And years later I saw him playing for Elton John, because his name was Ray Cooper.

Oh, of course, the bald guy with the glasses! Elton’s legendary percussionist!
Yeah, so Ray was this little school music teacher, and Ray Staff and myself never would have had an idea that many years later we would all be in the music business and kind of top of what we do.

That’s a great story!
So after that, moving on a few years, 16 and a half years old, I didn’t want to do further education, I left school, and I was looking for a job. I used to have a girlfriend who lived around the corner, so every time I came over to see her, I would come in here, not really knowing what was inside. I knew they were recording something. And I asked them for a job and they said “no no, no jobs, go away”. And I kept coming back, and eventually they said “give us your name, your number, and if anything comes up we’ll call you”

So it paid off after a while.
Yeah. I didn’t go to any other studios, I didn’t write to anyone I didn’t attempt to. I was about to start a job as a supermarket fitter travelling around the UK fitting out supermarkets. ‘Cause another girl friend, her brother owned a supermarket fitting company, so I was going to start work for him on a Monday, but fortunately Olympic called up on the Friday and they said “can you start next week?” 11 pounds a week. “Just come in”

When was that, in 1967?
Yes, March ’67.

Were you a music fan before that? Were you into rock and roll? Did you go to see shows?
No, I wasn’t into rock and roll at all. No, no, I was into musicals, I was into film music, totally orchestra-orientated. That’s the sound I loved. I also listened to the radio a lot, so I liked popular music. I didn’t go to gigs. I wasn’t into Hendrix, or Cream, or the Stones (laughs)

6

McCartney, Glyn Johns and Jagger working at Olympic

Now that’s interesting because you ended up working for them, when it wasn’t your thing.
No, it wasn’t my thing. In fact, I remember my first session. I was an assistant to Glyn Johns at a Stones’ session. I’d met Glyn only once before, I’d never met the Stones. I was in the studio setting up. I can’t remember who arrived, but one or two of the Stones arrived, and I actually called security, because I thought there was someone, you know, someone breaking in, or trying to steal something (laughs), they looked very dubious. They weren’t like the musicians, I was used to working with in orchestras and stuff but that soon changed.

That’s when you became a record producer and a mixer.
No, for maybe three years I was an assistant engineer. And the studio manager, Keith Grant, who built Olympic Studios, who gave me my job, he said, “the longer you can put up with being an assistant, you’ll learn and learn and learn”, which was so true. So I was an assistant for three and a half years, and then my lucky break really was when I was an assistant on a Johnny Hallyday album. The engineers at that time were all house engineers, they were all paid by Olympic, they weren’t freelance engineers, except for Glyn, he was one of the first freelance engineers.

7

1970: Keith Grant (left) and Scott Walker

So you were pretty much coming around here every day.
Yeah, so I worked on orchestra sessions, jingle sessions, jazz sessions, pop sessions. No rock and roll. That wasn’t until later. And so for three and a half years I was an assistant, and then on one session with Johnny Hallyday, just started recording the album. On the second day the Olympic engineer didn’t turn up. He didn’t turn up because he didn’t like the French people. It was kind of strange because the producer, Johnny’s producer, was actually American. His name is Lee Halliday, from Oklahoma, he’s American, he lived in France. So they were trying to figure out who could engineer, as they got musicians coming, and Lee said “Well what about Kimsey? What about him?” And they said “well, he’s never engineered before but I’m sure he can” So I jumped in the seat and that was it. I never left the seat after that. And Johnny fell in love with me, I mean, he loved the sound. After that I had a very, very strong relationship with Johnny, I must have done maybe five albums with him.

8Do you remember what the first one was?
The first one was ‘Flagrant Delit’, it’s got ‘Jolie Sarah’ on it, and the album cover is a cobbled street, with like a bronze bust of his head with his fist punching through. Mick Jones of Foreigner was in that band, he was Johnny’s guitar player, way before Foreigner. Mickey’s has got to learn his craft writing and playing for Johnny.

And it was a great time for Johnny Hallyday, he was great in England.
No, he was never popular in England, but he was always recording generally in London. And those sessions were fantastic because the producer we would have Ringo was on drums, well some of the drums, Peter Frampton was on the sessions, Gary Wright of Spooky Tooth... So I got to meet all those musicians making this album, and became very good friends with Peter Frampton. So that led on for me to carry on and work with Peter.

I’ve always wondered if it’s easier to be a record producer, or a mixer. If you had to choose one…
If I had to choose one, I like the process of recording, creating the atmosphere, and working with a band on talking about arrangements. Not mixing, I’d rather be recording or producing. I mean, I enjoy mixing too. I think I’d rather mix things now that I haven’t recorded. I mean, I just finished an album with Peter Perrett, and I said at the beginning “I don’t want to mix this”. I want someone else to mix it.

And you’ve actually did more recording than mixing all through your career.
I’ve got no idea, I don’t know. I mean, I generally do mix what I’ve recorded.

As a record producer or mixer, do you have the chance to choose the artist who you work for? I mean, can you say “yes” or “no”? Or do you have to follow orders from Olympic?
Yes, I can now. With Olympic no, it was always who they said I had to work with.

Whatever artist…
Yeah, whatever one. But what was strange, I didn’t stay working for Olympic very long. After I had that session with Johnny Hallyday. I did some albums with Ten Years After, I was still an Olympic engineer.

9The ‘Watt’ album?
No, the bigger one, ‘Space In Time’, which was one of my favourite albums. And Gary Wright I was recording him as an Olympic engineer. I think I was only an Olympic engineer for maybe a year, and then I was getting so busy I thought “I’m gonna become freelance and do it on my own” And I did. I was still working here all the time (laughs) People were coming to me, and fortunately the best people were coming to me, or good people.


How did you manage to find the time to work for Olympic and also freelancing?

Well, I think I must have been at least a year engineering for Olympic, and then I decided to leave. But most of the artists wanted to record here anyway, and Olympic didn’t have any problem with an outside engineer working here. And it’s the same with Glyn. The reason why Glyn came to Olympic, or one of the reasons, was that Abbey Road would not allow outside engineers. A lot of studios wouldn’t allow that, you had to be an engineer who worked in the studio, in house. And Olympic didn’t have that rule, so it was one of the first studios to enable the freelance engineers.

Very interesting. So your first job with a rock and roll band was in 1970, wasn’t it? I mean, the ‘Led Zeppelin III’ album, the ‘Watt’ album by Ten Years after, as an engineer, and then as tape operator for the Stones’ ‘Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!’. Since this is the place where you actually began your career those albums meant an easy or a difficult start? I mean, you worked with the Stones and Led Zeppelin in the very same year.
Well, to me, it wasn’t difficult, as all those artists weren’t important to me, because of the musical background that I enjoyed, or came from. I would have been very nervous if I’d be working with Nat King Cole or Frank Sinatra. Still to my date, they’re idols. But the Stones, their music at the time was like “oh, it’s ok, interesting”, Zeppelin “ok, that’s interesting”. That type of music was very new as well, so it was groundbreaking stuff, so you weren’t really aware that you were working on something that was so groundbreaking, although I suppose with Zeppelin you would have felt it a little more than the Stones. The whole Zeppelin thing was quite the whole mystic around it. That Zeppelin thing was bigger than the band itself.

Do you remember the very first time, the very moment you met the members of Led Zeppelin and the Stones? I guess you were pretty relaxed as they weren’t Nat King Cole or Sinatra.
Yeah, it was here. I was just relaxed and doing my job.

Were they nice to you?
I don’t remember anyone being…No one was being an arsehole. Yes, they were nice, they were fine!

It was a natural feeling, you didn’t feel subordinate to the musicians.
Yeah, you were part of the team. It’s all a team thing, so… You might see an argument between the band and the producer, or the band and the engineer, but that was it. But not really “arguments”, no.

11

A session at Olympic in 1971 including Ringo Starr, Klaus Voormann, Peter Green and Steve Marriott, all facing B.B.King.

The following year, in 1971, you did B.B. King’s album “In London”…
Yes, that was B.B. King doing sessions at Studio Two. I think that was only for a couple of days. I don’t remember that very well, that’s why I think it wasn’t a week over there. It was more like a “in and out” job. I was definitely not aware of who B.B. King was at the time.

But the same year you worked with the Stones for the “Sticky Fingers” album, who you had already met before. The album was recorded here in Olympic, as well as in Trident studios, and then also in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Being it such an important album in rock’n’roll history, any memories of the recording? Is there anything left to say?
No, I think it’s all been said. But I remember the strings session for ‘Moonlight Mile’ with Paul Buckmaster. I remember that was done at Basing Street Studios, that wasn’t done here. Actually that was maybe the first time I really felt the power of an orchestral arrangement with rock music. Because his arrangement was absolutely mind blowing on that. And to hear the orchestra alone was quite beautiful. Although I had recorded an orchestra with Del Newman for Ten Years After, that was quite a smaller orchestra. The arrangement on ‘Moonlight Mile’ was really quite grand.

12

Tony Visconti and Chris: a clash of legends

So that’s when orchestra meets rock and roll, and that’s when you started getting interested in it.
Well, an album I’ve just finished now has got orchestra through the whole album. It’s not rock ’n’ roll, it’s more R&B, old school r‘n’b. But I brought Tony Visconti out of retirement. Not that Tony’s ever retired. Not many people realise that Tony is an excellent orchestral arranger, and writer, and conductor. He does everything. I knew this. We met each other about 3 years ago, just before David (Bowie) passed away. We became very good friends. So when I asked him to orchestrate this album he was like “Really, wow, yeah!”, and he did such an incredible job. I also got Paul Buckmaster to do one song as well, which was good, but Tony was quite incredible.

So was it you who recommended him for the Stones’ sessions?

For the Stones? No. I don’t know who that would have been, actually.

And he did ‘Sway’ as well.
Yeah, ‘Sway’ too. I don’t know how that connection came up. I’m pretty sure it must have been a Mick connection, it wouldn’t have been a Keith connection.

You worked with many people here at Olympic, like George Chkiantz, Glyn Johns, Roger Savage, Eddie Kramer, Jimmy Miller…Any memories of them?
I’ve never worked with Eddie. I knew him, but never worked with him. Jimmy Miller was a terrific producer and mood creator, and he had a wonderful ear for percussion. Jimmy just made everyone feel good in the room, and if there was a problem, he always knew how to sort it out and to keep the flow and the energy going. He was a good man.

Cut to 1973, when you did The “Brain Salad Surgery” with Emerson, Lake and Palmer and Peter Frampton’s ‘Camel’ album.
ELP, yes, but I didn’t do the Peter one, Eddie Kramer did that. But Emerson, Lake and Palmer, that was really fun, I enjoyed doing that. I wanted to work with them, so it was great when I got the call to do it.

13And then in 1974 you were producer and engineer for Bill Wyman’s ‘Monkey Grip’, which happened to be the first solo album by a member of the Rolling Stones.
It’s true, Bill’s was the first, yeah. I don’t think I was producer on that, I think I came in to mix some of it, because a lot of it was done in the States, I believe. Bill was always in Olympic. If he wasn’t doing a solo album, he was working with a band called The End, and I engineered some of that, so Bill was here a lot doing different things other than the Stones. And he asked for me to work with or Keith Harwood, who was another Olympic engineer, but he went freelance. Keith, we were very close friends. Keith recorded a lot with Led Zeppelin, and he did “Black and Blue” with the Stones.

There’s a few words dedicated to him on the back cover of the Stones’ ‘Love You Live’ album.
Yeah. He died of a car crash when he was coming back from Stargroves, from Mick’s house.

14In 1976 you did Peter Frampton’s classic ‘Frampton Comes Alive’ album, which is one of the best selling live albums ever. Did you or Peter know at the time it would be such a hit album?
No. I mean, we knew it was good because when mixing it, you just got a wonderful euphoria feeling from listening to it. And that’s because the audience really made that record. You can just feel the communication of the audience. It was commented we added more audience, but we didn’t do any of that. That’s exactly how it was. No fixes, no additions. I recorded two concerts for the album, and Eddie recorded some and there were others. I recorded less than the others, but I mixed the whole thing. And I had so much fun mixing it. I remember the flanger, which had just been invented. I used it on the Fender Rhodes, on ‘Do You Feel’, on Bobby’s (Mayo) solo. Yeah I had great fun, but when we finished mixing that album, because there was a very small budget, we had only mixed a single album, and then Jerry Moss came down for playback with Peter’s manager, Dee Anthony. And we playback’ed what we mixed one album and Jerry said “where’s the rest?” And we said we were told by Peter’s manager we could only do a single album, “nobody wants a double album”, and Jerry said “no, you have to do a double album, the whole show” So we went back in and mixed the rest of the album.

And then it became such a hit album.
Yeah. It was nearly a single album. It’s still a great album to listen to. I know that Peter has remixed it a few years ago. I haven’t listened to the remix (laughs) I don’t quite see it. We’ve had this discussion about a lot of records that get remixed, classic albums that get remixed again is like “why?” Why remaster, when you can get it right the first time?

15

A young Peter Frampton and a young Chris Kimsey working on “Frampton Comes Alive!”

Right, if it’s good, why touching it?
Exactly. Most remasters are done, so the record companies think they will re-sell again but a lot of them, when they remaster it, they fuck it up. It doesn’t sound as good as the original.

Somehow the record companies need to tell the audiences “you should get this as it’s a remastered version”. That’s probably the trick to sell them again.
The thing with the remasters is, a lot of the time, they don’t even ask the producer or the engineer, they just go ahead and do it. There was a terrible remaster of the Stones, “Some Girls” album. It was terrible, actually terrible! Six months after the release, the public put it up on Amazon, “this is the worse…”. Then I contacted the Stones’ management and they said, “well it’s got a 5 star review on Rolling Stone”, we don’t really care.

Well, as far as I remembered, it’s Mick Jagger who gave orders to remaster it that way. In the end I think he just doesn’t like to go back to the past. He hates nostalgia.
Mick doesn’t like to go back at all. Absolutely, yeah. Actually I have to say it’s quite remarkable how they are touring and doing the gigs. The rest of them are holding up well. There’s only two albums that have been remastered that sounded better, and that was Marillion’s ‘Misplaced Childhood’. The original sound was really good but they guy who orchestrated that, Simon (Wilson), he worked for EMI, and he really loved what he was doing, he really appreciated what could go wrong. So he really kept an eye on this whole remastering thing. And he also was in charge of remastering the Peter Tosh ‘Mama Africa’ album. So sometimes it can come off good but I still think what’s the point of doing it, if it sounds great already? It’s more of a sales venture for the record company.

It all just comes down to put a sticker on them reading “remastered version”, suggesting that you’ve got to buy it.
Yeah, you should put a sticker on it saying, now in “mono” (laughs)

16By the way, talking about the Stones and remastered versions, before you co-produced some of their albums, in 1978 you worked as an engineer for the original ‘Some Girls’. During the recording of the album, there were reportedly lots of problems concerning Keith, as he wasn’t showing at the studio when it was supposed. How did you cope with that?
Yeah, we were always waiting for them to show up anyway, not just Keith. Keith would be there, but he still had his habit, so he would disappear to the toilet for maybe an hour, so we’d be just hanging around, waiting. But actually Mick was very supportive during that time for Keith, he knew what Keith was going through, he knew the pressure. He also knew if he didn’t get through the Stones wouldn’t be any more. I think there was an ulterior motive as well. He wasn’t slagging him off or complaining. He was really helping him. That was good to see that friendship.

And just 2 years after that you worked in the “Emotional Rescue” album at the same studio in Paris, Pathé Marconi, as associate producer and engineer mixer. There were lots of outtakes from both the ‘Some Girls’ and ‘Emotional Rescue’ sessions.
Yes, quite a lot of material that never made it to ‘Some Girls’, some of it ended up in ‘Emotional Rescue’, and what else left over ended up on ‘Tattoo You’.

17

Chris and Keith Richards during the mixing of “Get Yer Ya-Ya´s Out!”, 1969

So at the time you were finally really into rock’n’roll.
Yeah, actually ‘Some Girls’ in a way was one of the easiest albums to record in so much as when I walked into the room, I knew exactly how I wanted to set the band up, and the sound that I wanted from the room. I put a little P.A. up, so you could hear Charlie’s snare drum and bass drum, ‘cause they didn’t want to use headphones that much. And also to put Mick’s vocals through because I had this feeling they were a live band. In the studio, you don’t want to restrict them. You want to give them the capability of a feel like they’re playing in a club or just playing live. So the setup I had in that studio worked well. The console worked really well, and the control room worked really well too, because it was so small, you couldn’t get more than three people in there. It was kind of strange, really, because it’s the first time that I’d been asked to record the whole album, the whole sessions. Mick and Keith hardly ever came in the control room, I think they may have came in once or twice during the first 2 or 3 days, and just listened they didn’t say anything about the sound. And that was it. Left me to it really after that. I just carried on doing what I wanted to do inside, and outside as well, as I helped with the guitar sounds a bit, mainly in volume, or maybe a pedal.

And you had won their complete trust at that stage.
Yeah. To me they didn’t impress me as rock gods. They were just a bunch of musicians. And I was trying to help them capture something.

18

Kimsey and Ronnie Wood. On the Stones: “To me they didn’t impress me as rock gods. They were just a bunch of musicians. And I was trying to help them capture something”

And you got a great sound. I mean, the original one, not the remastered version…
Yeah! (laughs) The sound from that album is quite unique because of the set up, and the console as well. That was a very special time. I kinda knew that. Keith knew it as well, because there was a period where…We weren’t supposed to stay in that room. That was the cheaper room, with an old EMI desk. We were supposed to go into Studio 2 which had the big new Neve desk. The recording area was just as big, there were two very large rooms, but I loved the sound that we were getting from the studio with the old console. And so did Keith. We actually said to Mick, “we shouldn’t move” Because Mick was for, you know, “the future”.

So once again, why touching things when they’re ok?
We didn’t, thank God.

Did you have unlimited time to work in the studio?
Yeah, pretty much I think they would have booked like two months or something. That studio that we stayed in was a quarter of the price than the other one so it worked out good for everybody in that respect.

Was it easier working in the ‘Tattoo You’ album, as most of the original tracks were already recorded?
Well, we didn’t record anything for ‘Tattoo You’. It was stuff that I found, stuff that I knew that I recorded and hadn’t been used. So there was a good five or six songs. If I know that that’s what I’ve recorded and was around for there must be something on other albums.  So I started to look back at ‘Goats Head Soup’ and ‘Black and Blue’ and found a few other wonderful gems.

Did you choose the songs for the album, or was it a Mick and Keith decision? Or the three of you?
No, it was more the fact of what was available, and also what was the most near completion in regards to melody and lyrics for Mick.

But things like ‘Heaven’, wasn’t that new?
No, that was recorded in ‘Some Girls’, or maybe ‘Emotional Rescue’. I can’t remember which album, but that was Paris, yeah.

19Maybe ‘Litte T&A’ was a new one.
I can’t remember where the stuff I’d recorded whether it came from the ‘Some Girls’ or the ‘Emotional Rescue’ sessions. It was across the two. More likely from ‘Some Girls’, funny enough, ‘cause ‘Emotional Rescue’ was at a slower pace in making that record. It wasn’t as much fun as ‘Some Girls’. The energy had changed. Maybe by that time Keith had straightened up by that time? He must have been. So he would have suddenly started to wake up.

Probably the oldest one was ‘Waiting On a Friend’
That was from ‘Goats Head Soup’. The same with ‘Tops’. But ‘Tops’ was from Glyn, I think. That was when he was in Rotterdam with the mobile truck.

And then you were there for the complete change of ‘Start Me Up’ from the early reggae version to the rock n’ roll pop one?
Yeah – one of their biggest songs.

So your first real co-production with the Glimmer Twins was ‘Undercover’?
I can’t remember how the credits go. It’s a very underrated album. I think it is better than ‘Emotional Rescue’. I enjoy it more than ‘Emotional Rescue’. It was a very dangerous time with them. Because they were not getting on at all. I would love to get hold of the multitrack of ‘Undercover’ because I could use that for teaching because it was like no other track we’d recorded. It started with Charlie playing timpani and Mick on acoustic guitar just the two of them and it just grew from that. I had this crazy idea how I wanted to mix it. It took me two or three days to mix with all the backward stuff. It was all tape – no digital. I loved doing that – quite fantastic.

In Paris?
No, that was mixed in New York. It was recorded in Paris and then at Compass Point and New York.

A year later you were working with The Cult on the ‘Dreamtime’ album.
Yeah, that was in Berlin. I did a lot of work in Berlin. I did two Killing Joke albums in Berlin at Hansa, I did a JoBoxer record, Marillion’s ‘Misplaced Childhood’, The Cult, Spear of Destiny, a band called Eden. I think that was all in Hansa, I love that studio.

20How was working with Marillion like?
I loved it. We just did a film actually, the “making of” ‘Misplaced Childhood’. We had the multitrack there, which was fantastic to listen to it from Hansa – that magic hall. They also had the original track sheets, which was my writing, and the detail in the track sheets was amazing. It had to be very well classified, because it was a concept album. Song, going into song, going into song, continually on a reel of tape, you had to really plan ahead, so that everything correlated, that you didn’t have different things ended up on different tracks. You had to be very very thought out. And it’s quite amazing to look at what I did. Even the band said “well, this is incredible, we never knew that you did that, it sounds really good!” And it was the cheapest album I’ve ever made, and the biggest-selling album I’ve ever made.

Was it working with them more the kind of music you liked? Like “let’s get away from rock’n’roll a bit and work with some really serious people”
(Laughs) Yeah, it was actually. Well the Stones are more blues than rock and roll, I mean, Zeppelin and the Stones, are nowhere near the same. They are both called rock ‘n’ roll. The Stones were verging on the softer side, well not “softer” that’s not the right word. Yeah, it’s different, isn’t it? But Marillion were a lot more theatrical and cinematic. I liked working with them a lot, and I liked their music. But just as much as I like Killing Joke, which is the total opposite (laughs) Now that’s rock’n’roll to me, that’s heavy rock’n’roll. But see, with Killing Joke there was an orchestral element in Jaz Coleman’s composing, in the keyboard player, in his compositions. There was a very grand kind of sound to it.

Jaz Coleman arranged the Rolling Stones pop symphony you did?
Yes he did – he did four or five, ‘Angie’ is amazing. I love that album. That got five star reviews on Amazon. A beautiful album. The record company really fucked up on that. They didn’t know how to sell it. They got more savvy on later albums.

Do you prepare yourself in advance to work with different music styles? I mean, you jumped from the Stones to Marillion to Killing Joke…
And then to reggae!

And then to reggae.
Well I just love reggae really. I love all genres of music. Although I don’t like Metallica. Could I work with Metallica? No, I don’t think I could work. That would drive me insane. But there was another very heavy American band, they were huge. I had to say “no”. It’s one name…

Slayer? Anthrax?
Tool! They were huge. Massive. I got the call from them when I was working with the Gypsy Kings (laughs) And I’m like, trying to give my production observations to Tool while I’m working with the Gypsy Kings! It was insane.

By the way, right after Marillion you got to work with Ace Frehley, the ‘Frehley’s Comet’ album. That must have been fun.
Well, I didn’t do much on that. It was because of my friendship with Bill Aucoin. Ace was pretty messed up and needed help.

He just cleaned up after all these years.
Sometimes I get called in to work with artists who are impossible or generally fucked up. If I can break through and get to their heart and the soul, then I will do that. If I don’t have that connection, then I can’t do it.

So how do you manage if you’re not able to get that connection?
Then I don’t work with them. Like I said before, I just finished an album with Peter Perrett, who was in The Only Ones.

Yes, I remember them, ‘Another Girl, Another Planet’…
Yeah. But Peter had severe heroin addiction, for 25 years. I can’t believe he’s still alive. But he’s been clean for 7 years, but in those 7 years there were so many demons and problems, because his kids are in the band, and they suffered immense abuse from his parents being drug addicts for all their lifetime. But I had great joy in making that album, and what was really, really lovely, and this is what I think I’m good and which I get great reward from. It got to a point where Peter said “I can’t believe that I’m working with you because I trust you in everything” And it’s wonderful when you get that back from an artist. Not only if they’ve been through a major life crisis or not? it’s nice when you get that from a straight artist as well. It’s a wonderful album, and I’m very proud of it.

So, back to the questions…
Back to the future or past! (laughs)

22Yeah, I love that, “back to the past”… You worked with Peter Tosh on the ‘Mama Africa’ album. How did you enjoy working with him?
No, he was an arsehole. I loved his voice, and we had a very strange relationship in the studio because he didn’t have much respect for anyone other than himself. Not even the musicians! So he would just come to the studio, play three or four songs, all very simple, everyone would learn it, and then he’d say “ok I go for some fish!”, and he’d fuck off and come back in the evening to see if we done it. We finished it and done it and then he would put his vocals on top. I loved his voice, but as a person he wasn’t a very nice man.

So it must have been quite difficult to work with him.
Well, not difficult because he wasn’t there! That was the best thing! (laughs) As opposed to Jimmy Cliff, who was the opposite. Jimmy was like working with an angel, he’s such a wonderful person.

I believe Peter was there but then he wasn’t there, as he was always high.
Yeah. And there’s a very famous story when Donald Kinsey, the guitar player from Chicago, who was on that album. We both had this idea that Peter should do a cover of ‘Johnny B. Goode’, the Chuck Berry song. So one morning I played it to Peter and he said “me no sing no white man song”. So the next day I brought in a picture of Chuck Berry and said “this is the man who wrote ‘Johnny B. Goode’“.

He didn’t know Chuck?
No, he didn’t know him. And then he said “him brother, me do the song!” (laughs) And he did it very well. He changed the lyrics, which I loved, “the gunny sack”.

But Peter had such a great voice.
Wonderful voice, yeah. Wonderful songs in the album, actually. I still love the album, I love songs like ‘Glass House’ (starts singing). He was a great singer. And I met a lot of great musicians working on that album, like Sticky Thompson, the keyboard player Phil Ramacon, who lives in London. I just got to do a session with him, hadn’t seen him since then – so that was quite wonderful.

1989, another Stones co-production, ‘Steel Wheels’, a different kind of sound for the band.
Yeah different also in so much as I take a much broader control – not sure that’s the right word. I had a vision for a sound for that whole album, that it should be quite rich, quite lush. Not as raw as ‘Exile on Main Street’, not as trashy as ‘Some Girls’, I really wanted quite a big fat warm sound in the production.

It sounds clean and polished. More metallic.
Yeah, clean and polished, it was meant to sound like that. The whole thing in the arrangements and backing vocals it was more of a produced album, and I was really happy with the way it turned out, because before I started it I knew I wanted it to sound like that. Because in my mind was the next album, I wanted to go and make another ‘Exile’. I wanted the next one to be completely the opposite. But I thought to get it to work you’ve got to have a very new sounding Stones’ record. I don’t think there’s a Stones’ album that sounds like ‘Steel Wheels’ but that would be the shock, because after that you would get back to the grime.

And by the way I just remembered about ‘Let’s Go Steady’, this unreleased song from the ‘Emotional Rescue’ sessions that…
That’s a duet of my wife with Keith!

It always was one of my favourites Stones’ outtakes! How did that ever happen?
That’s very sweet. She would be very pleased to hear that! Actually that was recorded in Compass Point studios, in Nassau. My wife Kristi would travel everywhere with me, this was before the kids were born. I think it was like 2 or 3 in the morning, and Keith said “hey get Kristi, get her to come over, I want her to sing on this”.

I think she said, “no” because she could sing it better in the morning.
Did she say “no”? I can’t remember (laughs) Not at this time.  But anyway, she did it later. I think that they did one take. They were singing together live! It was great fun.

And Mick was out of the picture at the moment.
I don’t think Mick was on the island actually! (laughs)

And she did good!
She did really good! I mean, yeah, really really good! I mean, she had no time to learn the song. It was as if they had always sung together. It was quite special. She was quite instrumental in helping Keith finish “Slipping Away”. He had “slipping away, slipping away, slipping away…” for at least 2 years. Just that bit. But he didn’t have the other bits. And then one night when we were in Montserrat we were having dinner over at Keith’s house, and he was playing that, and Kristi started to sing something different, it just pushed him somewhere else, and he got to finish the song.

I love that one.
Yeah, that’s a lovely song. “First the sun and then the moon…”

R-2595654-1300717083We were talking about Guy Bailey and Thirsty at the beginning of the interview. And in 1992 you worked with the Quireboys for the “Bitter Sweet and Twisted” album, the second one featuring the original line-up, when Guy was still in the band.
Oh that was a nightmare! I inherited that from Bob Rock, that was with the song ‘King of New York’. Bob Rock started to produce that record and record it, he kind of walked away. I guess someone offered him more money, so he walked away and left it, and it ended up with me. And what I say is horrible is because the way that Bob recorded it. It was in the day when we had Sony digital machines, and Bob had linked up three 48-track machines. So one machine is full of guitar solos so I had like, you know, 48 guitar takes to go through. The whole album was like that. Everything had been replaced and replaced and replaced, and it took me a week, ‘cause I wanted to go back to find out the original recording, or where did this start from, and it took me a week to find that, which was a nightmare.

But you still liked the band.
I liked the band, yeah. I liked Spike and I liked Guy.

23A year later you worked in the ‘Full Moon, Dirty Hearts’ with INXS. Of course Michael Hutchence was such a prominent singer and star. Any anecdotes from that time?
Yeah, that was here. And Michael was a lovely man. He was one of the most gracious people that I’ve met and worked with, actually. Especially, I asked him to sing on the ‘Symphonic Stones’ album. I wanted him to do ‘Under My Thumb’. Michael came on board, he was absolutely thrilled to do it. And he was just so much fun to work with in the studio, very quick and very intelligent. Just a really nice guy, I got on really well with him. And, as a bonus one night, and this was when he was going out with the model Helena Christensen, he said “can you look after Helena for me?” Of course, no problem. (laughs) He was a sweet lovely man. When we worked on that album, it was kind of strange because, I had met them in Paris when I was working on a Stones album,  over there, and we got together, and they played me like half of that album. I thought it was demos, ‘cos it sounded really pretty ropey, it sounded rough, and I said “it will be great when you record it properly” And they said “that is recorded properly” And I went “oh!” (laughs) They said “do you think we should do this again?” So we came here and we recorded it, we didn’t do the whole album and we did that duet with Chrissie Hynde, which was crazy. She arrived and we were already doing the vocal, the duet, and she said “I’m just gonna go out to do some shopping”, and she went out for 5 hours. She has “studio stage fright. She hates being in the studio. So she came, she looked and listened and went.

Maybe that’s the reason why she always takes so long to put a new album.
Maybe. 5 hours, that was exaggeration, but it was a good hour and a half (laughs) You know, “where did Chrissie go?”

In 1995 there was another Stones album you worked in, ‘Stripped’, and also the Chieftains’ ‘The Long Black Veil’.
Oh yes. I’d been working with the Chieftains before, because I’d become very good friends with their manager Steve Macklan, because I’d been working with the Canadian Colin James, producing two of Colin albums. So I met Paddy (Moloney) through that connection. And then I worked on the album, which had many guests. The Four Stones, Sting was on one, Bono on another. I remember going to a meeting with Paddy and Mick in Ireland, about which song to cover. That’s when it was a shock to Paddy that Mick knew ‘The Long Black Veil’. He didn’t think Mick would know it. I did a couple of things with the Chieftains. Very sad. The harpist of the band, Derek Bell, very talented, he passed away, and they did a live tribute album that I mixed with Paddy.

For a change, then in 1996 you worked with the Gypsy Kings, the ‘Compas’ album.
That was fun. I enjoyed that, because my whole ethos on that album was that I didn’t want any brass, no horns, or any drums. I just wanted the Gypsy Kings. But I did take Pino Palladino for bass and Jon Carin for some keyboard. But I had great fun making that album. But the problem with them was that their manager, Claude Martinez, he kind of owned more of the Gypsy Kings than the Gypsy Kings owned. He’s a very shrewd businessman. But he kept an eye on their writing because they were very bad. They would come in and play a song. They pitched it, and they had nicked it from someone else on the radio. They just heard it and they would do it and he said “no you can’t do that, that’s whatever it is”. So he was good otherwise they would be in court all the time.

Now I’d like to ask you about working with Ray Davies, which was in 2007. Was it difficult?
Yeah, he was difficult, he was interesting! I’ve got a lot of sympathy for Ray. I saw him just recently, ‘cause I’ve been working doing the Peter Perrett album at his studio, Konk Studios. Now he’s very lovely, he came in to say “hello”, which was very nice. But he’s driven by demons. I think it gets to a point in a solo artist’s career, where they always get frightened of putting anything out. Because they obviously want it to be successful in a way, and I think that’s a wrong thing to do. I think you should just keep “putting it out, putting it out”, and once you start to stand back and worry,  then you start second-guessing, and it’s never good. So the album I worked with him on, he re-recorded it, I think, two times again. He just kept doing it with different people. Yeah he’s a lovely man. What amazed me the most, actually the two most incredible experiences with Ray was one when he said “which acoustic guitar should I use?” “oh this one I wrote Lola on?” I said “Lola, I think you should use that one”. But also, in doing vocals with him, we recorded the track and then he would go sing like three takes of vocals, and when he came in the control room he said “I want the first verse from take three, the second line of verse two from take one, the first line from take two”. And I put it all together and it was perfect. He has an amazing memory. Amazing. He was weird and wonderful.

It’s been a fantastic interview, Chris, and so I guess I’d like to close it by asking you about your recent work with Thirsty, which is actually how the interview started.
Guy had recorded pretty much everything, and then he needed someone to come in as an overview, so I would go to Guy’s and listen to everything, and make suggestions on arrangements, or whatever. And then Guy would implement that. Maybe oversee the arrangements and make sure the vocals were good, and then I mixed it all. So it was more of an overseeing situation, but then when it got to mixing I did what I want mixing wise.

How long did it take to get it all together?
I mixed it really quick, I mixed it in about 4 or 5 days. Very quickly. But I did a lot of work with Guy at his place building the tracks. I knew what I was gonna do, or what I’d have to do. The first album, ‘Thirsty’, I actually think I worked on it for maybe 4 months, but the second one, ‘Albatross’, was a lot quicker.

You returned to Olympic Studios in 2014. Why was that?
I returned to Olympic because I became very good friends with the new owners and they know nothing about the music business, they’re in film business and graphic design. They were absolutely thrilled to meet me because I became the link back to the musical history of Olympic, because I go back to the beginning of Olympic. And through that they invited me to … they knew Olympic’s heritage of the best sound, so they wanted the best sound for the cinema. So I designed the sound in the cinema for them. Most cinemas have a kind of off the shelf sound system. This is not that, this is a completely unique system, so I helped to do that, and then I introduced them to Keith Grant, ‘cause Keith was still alive when they bought the building, and also to help with the 50th anniversary book they’re making. We have selected 120 albums of the 900 and something that were recorded here, with all the album covers. And they’re going in the book. And I’ve been speaking to different artists like Cat Stevens. I got a lovely letter from him getting different bits and pieces from different artists.

It must have been a difficult task to pick them.
It still is, because we wanted 100, but we can’t get below 120. It was very difficult. When you look at what was recorded in this building, it’s quite ridiculous. I begin to really appreciate and understand, “what Olympic!”, they get incredibly excited because they know only a fraction of what’s gone on here. And then all that led to me discussing with the owners about building a studio here, and it was gonna be in a tiny little room in the basement a couple of years ago, but I couldn’t do that, because it wouldn’t be Olympic, it would be too small. So now we’re building one on the roof, the other roof, which is as big as Screen one. It’s a big room. We’ve just finished the first sound proof wall, we have to do the floating floors next, so hopefully it will be opened in summer, next year. That’s what I’m aiming towards. So that will be a complete joy for me. It will be my design, I mean, I’ll be here, I’ll be the manager, and I’ll be working in there for sure. We are looking forward to that very much.

So who are you working with now?
The last song mix for Peter Perrett. An album with Noah Johnson. Another artist I’ve been working with. That’s maybe one of the best albums I’ve made. I’m so happy with that one. It’s a soul, Marvin Gaye type album. He’s Welsh and got a helluva voice, a great songwriter. I pulled out all of my knowledge. That’s the one with Tony Visconti on the strings and Paul Buckmaster. Steve Jordan on some drums. Jennifer Maidman on bass, Jon Carin, amazing album. All my friends. We are mastering it now. It should be out in May.

You haven’t worked with any South American artists yet, and you sure know there’s a lot of music there.
Yeah, I know, some amazing performers and music. I was just talking about it, that would be exciting.

Is there any artist or band you would love to work with that you haven’t worked with?
I love Laura Mvula. I met her several times. I don’t think I could work with her, she’s got her team but I love her work. Also with a band called King King, a big blues band.

Ok Chris, thanks for a fantastic time and interview…
Oh! Pete Townshend, I’d love to do Pete’s new album. We met the other day, he’s writing at the moment. He’s been working upstairs, we had a good afternoon, it was funny. And also because he’s in the book as well with his solo album ‘Who Came First’, and also ‘Who’s Next’ which was done here. He’s got a console I’m thinking to put in the studio. It’s a special console, so he lent it to me. He’s got the only one in the U.K. That’s was very nice of him.

24

The article´s author and Chris at Olympic, November 2016

So, once again, thanks so much, if this is not the best interview I’ve ever done…
Oh you say that to everyone! (laughs) Thank you as well, I enjoyed it too!

*With special thanks to Martin Elliott (http://stonessessions.com/) for facilitating the interview and also for suggesting some great questions.

CON CHRIS KIMSEY, PRODUCTOR EXTRAORDINAIRE: “ME GUSTA EL PROCESO DE GRABAR, CREAR CLIMAS, TRABAJAR ARREGLOS”

Estándar

Los Cuatro Escalones. No, si no se trata de un error numérico para referirse a una de las grandes obras cinematográficas que nos dejó Hitchcock, pero bien serviría como título de esta nota. Es todo lo que lleva adentrarse en uno de los bastiones más significativos de la historia de la música popular de al menos el último medio siglo. Cuatro peldaños, la única frontera que divide el mundo del más acá con el del ingreso al edificio de Olympic, ubicado en el barrio de Barnes, apenas del otro lado del Támesis, acaso el más legendario de los estudios de grabación londinenses junto a su tradicional compañero Abbey Road. Y de Inglaterra toda también. MADHOUSE se reunió con Chris Kimsey en noviembre del año pasado en ese estudio -el mismísimo lugar de los hechos- para darle rienda a las mil y una historias vividas en el predio emblemático que gestó la carrera de este talentoso productor discográfico, ingeniero de sonido y músico inglés, el mismo que cincuenta años más tarde aún mantiene viva su pasión por el trabajo, casi como si el tiempo no hubiera pasado… y del otro lado de los mismos cuatro escalones.

1EL SONIDO DEL OLIMPO. Establecido en 1906, primeramente como teatro de su propia compañía de repertorio bajo el nombre de Byfeld Hall, actividad que mantuvo hasta fines de los 50 cuando pasó a convertirse en estudio de televisión, fue en 1965 que la firma Olympic Sound Studios decidió adquirir este edificio y así darle paso a la más celebrada de sus actividades: la de estudio independiente de grabación, dentro de cuyas paredes descansan algunas de las sesiones más seminales de la historia del rock y el pop angloparlante. Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, Stones, Beatles, los Who, Bowie, Howlin’ Wolf, Ray Charles, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Clapton, B.B. King, Ten Years After, Barbra Streisand, Stevie Wonder, Roxy Music, Jethro Tull, Prince, Queen, Supertramp, Van Morrison, Thin Lizzy, Iggy Pop, Motörhead, Yardbirds, Madonna, Oasis, Duran Duran… La lista de artistas que allí plsmaron algunos de sus mejores discos podría alcanzar tranquilamente el número de 150, sólo por detallar los más renombrados. Así fue como Olympic logró mantener una reputación incomparable girando alrededor de su eje de calidad de sonido, excelencia técnica y atmósfera sin rivales, convirtiéndolo en el sitio que llevaba a la crema del rock y el pop a ambas orillas del Atlántico a coincidir en eso de “el estudio al que había que ir a grabar”.
2En enero de 2009 los estudios Olympic cerraron sus puertas por primera vez en su historia, con la industria discográfica británica perdiendo uno de sus espacios de grabación de más envergadura. Cambio de rumbo mediante, fueron reabiertas a fines de 2013 bajo el nombre de Olympic Cinema, modificando su geografía original para albergar a dos salas de cine de última tecnología sonora y también agregando un restaurant, un café y una sala para socios del lugar. Pero aquellos cuatro escalones se mantuvieron en pie como en sus primeros días. Son los mismos que, con algún que otro lapso intermedio, viene cruzando Chris Kimsey desde allá por 1969, cuando era apenas un adolescente con una leve inclinación amateur hacia la industria de la grabación, aterrizando en Olympic buscando meramente un empleo que le financie sus gastos personales. Casi medio siglo más tarde, aquel joven que inicialmente fue contratado para servir el té a los empleados y músicos que trabajaban en el establecimiento acabaría convirtiéndose en uno de los productores, mezcladores e ingenieros de sonido más renombrados que la música recuerde.

SEDIENTO DE ROCK AND ROLL
Me gustaría comenzar preguntándote por uno de tus trabajos más recientes, “Albatross”, el segundo disco de Thirsty (N. la banda del ex Quireboys Guy Bailey) Por lo que leí es un disco que disfrutaste mucho hacer.
Sí, ese disco realmente está recibiendo muy buenas críticas.

A decir verdad, todavía no lo tengo, pero tuve la oportunidad de escucharlo online. Y también me alegro por Guy, que sé que quedó muy feliz con los resultados. Pero parece que no quieren presentarlo en vivo.
Yo también, resulta un gran vehículo para él. Intenté que se involucre en otras cosas en varias oportunidades. Guy está de acuerdo con todo  lo que sea escribir canciones, pero no quiere salir a tocar en vivo. Lo que es una pena, realmente… Hizo algunas cosas en vivo, como cuando estuvo con los Peckham Cowboys, pero es una lástima, porque él podría enseñarle un montón de cosas a muchos chicos. Es todo un problema. Y tiene que ser Guy quien lo haga, no podés hacer que otro se encargue de la guitarra. Pero nos llevamos muy bien, me gusta la manera en que lo enfoca, y su voz. Grabó la mayor parte del disco en el cuarto donde duerme. Él no guarda ningún tipo de consideración por los compresores de audio, o por los limitadores. Todo tiene que ser a volumen 11. Pero funciona bien, me gusta, así que fue divertido.

Me gustan mucho los Quireboys, pero en verdad mis dos álbumes favoritos fueron “A Bit Of What You Fancy” y “Bitter Sweet And Twisted”, los dos primeros, los dos donde estuvo Bailey. Creo que eran mucho más “rock’n’roll” antes que se alejara de la banda
.
Tal vez. Es una muy buena combinación que él escriba la música, y las melodías, y también es muy bueno con las letras.

3

El álbum debut de Thirsty, la banda de Guy Bailey, en la foto con sombrero y cigarrillín: no se ve, pero la mano de Kimsey está presente

Reitero entonces lo de haberla pasado muy bien trabajando con Thirsty…
Sí. ¿Cuándo fue eso? ¿Hace 4 años? Y además es bueno ver que se vuelvan a juntar para hacer otro disco. Él tenía grabado casi todo, y sólo necesitaba alguien que vaya y lo vea más en general. Entonces yo iba a lo de Guy y escuchaba todo, y hacía sugerencias respecto a arreglos, o lo que fuera, y él lo implementaba. Quizás lo que yo hacía era revisar que la parte vocal estuviera bien, y después mezclar todo. Así que se trató más de una situación de revisar lo que se había grabado, pero a la hora de mezclarlo, lo hice con todo el conocimiento posible.Reitero entonces lo de haberla pasado muy bien trabajando con Thirsty…

¿Cuánto te llevó terminar la mezcla?
Lo hice realmente rápido, lo mezclé en cuatro o cinco días. Muy rápido. Pero trabajé mucho con Guy en su casa construyendo las pistas. Sabía lo que iba a hacer, o lo que haría. Respecto al primer álbum, “Thirsty”, creo que en verdad estuve trabajando en él por alrededor de cuatro meses, pero el segundo fue mucho más veloz.

Confieso, Chris, tenés una carrera tan impresionante, que no sé cómo empezar…Bueno, (señalando al estudio) ¡todo comienza aquí! (Risas)

EL CHICO DE LA INDUSTRIA DEL SONIDO
¿Cuánto tiempo llevás exactamente trabajando en la industria musical y, principalmente, cómo es que todo comenzó? Quiero decir, probablemente te haya pasado lo que les pasó a todos nosotros, y que simplemente eras alguien a quien le gustaba la música. ¿Pero cómo fue realmente en tu caso?
Todo comenzó aquí, en 1967. Conseguí un puesto aquí  como “el chico que prepara y sirve el té”. Desconocía qué pasaba entre estas cuatro paredes. Solamente vi el cartel de “Olympic Studios” en la entrada. Y antes de eso, en la escuela, me encargaba de grabar la música o los efectos de sonido para las obras de teatro escolares, porque yo tenía un grabador de cinta. Conseguí mi primer grabador de cinta cuando tenía 9 o 10 años. Amaba escuchar bandas de sonido y musicales, nada de rock and roll o algo que se le parezca, sino lo que era más orquestado. Mis padres me habían dado el grabador, porque en esa época podías comprar cintas pregrabadas de 3¾ ips, de 3 pulgadas por segundo, ya fuera de musicales o de música de películas. No existían en vinilo. Y entonces conocí los grabadores de cinta desde muy chico. Y eso continuó en la escuela. Me pedían que grabara los efectos de sonido, de haberlos, o de las palabras de alguien, en caso que alguien hablara. Y entonces estaba involucrado con todo aquello. Y eso logró entusiasmar mi oído, me refiero al hecho de que uno podía capturar un sonido en una cinta.

4

Los estudios Olympic, allá lejos y en los años 60

Por lo que eras básicamente “el chico de la música del colegio”
Era “el chico de la música del colegio”. Y eso básicamente continuó porque, cuando tenía 14, me preguntaron si me gustaría ir a un estudio de grabación que pertenecía a la Inner London Education Authority, que era la autoridad escolar de aquel momento. Y tenían un estudio en Tottenham Court Road. Solía tomar el subte de Morden hasta Tottenham Court Road, al menos dos veces por mes, los sábados, para ir hasta esa escuela. Y el estudio de ahí era muy pequeño. Tenía un mezclador de cuatro canales Vortexian que constaba básicamente de cuatro perillas de volumen, y un grabador de cinta estéreo Ferrograph que, pensándolo bien, habrá sido mono. Eso hizo que me apasione mucho más. Y fui muy afortunado, porque una de las primeras personas que grabé allí fue Dame Sybil Thorndike, que por entonces era una actriz muy famosa. Era como la versión femenina de Laurence Olivier, y la grabé para un show llamado “Son Et Lumiere”, que iba a tener lugar en mi próxima escuela, donde también conté con un grabador de cinta. Y en ese estudio -y esto es algo muy fascinante- estaba yo, y había sólo otro estudiante, un joven que no era más de dos meses mayor. Él era de la parte del East End londinense, y yo era del sur, y ambos íbamos a este estudio los sábados. Se llamaba Ray Staff… Bueno, Ray terminó convirtiéndose -y sigue siendo- en uno de los mejores ingenieros masterizadores del mundo. Está a cargo de Air Mastering. Así que acabó metiéndose en el negocio de la música. Empezó en los estudios Trident. Y entonces, estos dos chicos jóvenes se la pasaban grabando varias cosas. El profesor que estaba a cargo del programa, que era maestro en la escuela, y también músico de jazz, una tarde nos dijo “cuando terminemos, ¿se quedarían un rato? Porque quiero grabar a mi trío de jazz”. Y entonces me quedé.Por lo que eras básicamente “el chico de la música del colegio”

Porque eras “el chico del sonido”
A mis 14 años, yo era “el chico del sonido”. Y años después lo vi tocando con Elton John, ¡porque su nombre era Ray Cooper!

5

La flemática actriz Dame Sybil Thorndike, una de las primeras voces grabadas por Kimsey

¿Ray Cooper, el legendario baterista de Elton John?
Ni más ni menos. Después de eso, algunos años más tarde, cuando tenía 16 y medio, no quise tener ningún tipo de educación. Dejé la escuela, y me puse a buscar trabajo. Por entonces tenía una novia que vivía a la vuelta de la esquina de Olympic, así que, cada vez que venía a verla, me daba una vuelta por aquí, sin saber qué había dentro. Sabía que grababan algo. Y les pedí trabajo, y me dijeron “no, no hay puestos vacantes, andate”.  Y seguí volviendo, y eventualmente me dijeron “danos tu nombre, tu número de teléfono, y si aparece algo, te llamamos”.

Entonces todo aquel esfuerzo terminó rindiendo después de un tiempo.
Sí. No fui a otros estudios, no le escribí a nadie. Estaba a punto de comenzar a trabajar como repositor en un supermercado, lo que me iba a llevar a viajar por otros lugares de Inglaterra. Porque el novio de otra amiga que tenía era el dueño de una compañía de repositores de supermercados, y yo estaba por empezar a trabajar con él un lunes, pero afortunadamente Olympic me llamó el viernes anterior  y me preguntaron, “¿podés comenzar la semana próxima?. Son 11 libras por semana. Venite”.

¿Eso cuándo fue, en 1967?
Sí, en marzo del ’67.

¿Para entonces te considerabas fan de la música? ¿Te gustaba el rock and roll, o solías ir a ver shows?
No, no estaba para nada en el rock and roll. Estaba metido en los musicales, en la música de películas, totalmente orientado a lo orquestal. Ése era el tipo de sonido que adoraba. También escuchaba mucha radio, por lo que me gustaba la música popular. No iba a conciertos. No me interesaba ni Hendrix, ni Cream, ni los Stones (Risas)

6

McCartney, Glyn Johns y Jagger: pierna de ases

Lo que resulta muy interesante saber, ya que terminaste trabajando con ellos, aún cuando no era lo tuyo.
No, no era lo mío. De hecho, recuerdo mi primera sesión. Yo era asistente de Glyn Johns en una sesión de grabación de los Stones. Había estado con Glyn sólo una vez anteriormente, y nunca había conocido a los Stones. Estaba en el estudio armando las cosas. No recuerdo quién fue que llegó, pero llegaron uno o dos de ellos, y terminé llamando a la gente de seguridad, porque pensé que se trataba de alguien que se había metido en el estudio, o que quería robarse algo… (Risas). Tenían una apariencia muy dudosa. No eran como otros músicos. Yo estaba acostumbrado a trabajar con orquestas, etc. Pero todo eso cambió más tarde.

Ahí fue cuando te convertiste en productor de discos y mezclador de sonido.
No, fui asistente del ingeniero de sonido por alrededor de tres años. Y el mánager del estudio, Keith Grant, quien había construido Olympic Studios, el mismo que me había dado el puesto, me dijo, “cuánto más puedas aguantar ser asistente, más y más vas a poder aprender”. Lo que era muy real. Entonces fui asistente por 3 años y medio, y luego llegó mi golpe de suerte cuando me tocó trabajar en un disco de Johnny Hallyday. Los ingenieros de aquel momento eran todos de la casa, todos pagos por Olympic. No eran freelance, excepto Glyn. Él fue uno del los primeros ingenieros freelance.

7

1970: Keith Grant (sentado) con el cantautor Scott Walker dándole lo que parecen ser minuciosas instrucciones.

Lo que hacía que tuvieras que venir aquí casi a diario.
Sí, y trabajaba en sesiones de orquestas, de jingles, sesiones de jazz, de pop… Nada de rock and roll. Eso no ocurrió hasta después. Y entonces después de esos tres años y medio en los que fui asistente, en aquella sesión con Johnny Halliday, me puse a grabar el álbum. Pero al segundo día, el ingeniero de sonido de Olympic no apareció. No vino, porque no le gustaban los franceses. Fue algo bastante raro porque el productor del disco, el productor de Johnny, en realidad era norteamericano. Su nombre era Lee Halliday, de Oklahoma, y vivía en Francia. Y entonces estaban tratando de ver quién podía encargarse de ser ingeniero del disco, porque ya estaban llegando los músicos, y Lee dijo “¿Y Kimsey? ¿No puede hacerlo él?”. Y ellos contestaron, “bueno, él nunca trabajó como ingeniero, pero estamos seguros de que puede hacerlo”. Me senté en la silla de control… y nunca dejé esa silla. Y Johnny se enamoró de mí, quiero decir, le encantó el sonido. Después de aquella vez, siempre tuve una fuerte relación con Johnny. Debo haber hecho cinco álbumes con él.

8¿Recordás cuál fue ese primer disco?
El primero fue “Flagrant Delit”, el que tiene la canción “Jolie Sarah”. En la tapa hay una calle empedrada, con una especie de busto de bronce, con sus puños de lado. Mick Jones de Foreigner estaba en esa banda, era el guitarrista de Johnny por entonces, mucho antes de Foreigner. Mickey aprendió su arte escribiendo y tocando para Johnny.

La carrera de Johnny estaba pasando un gran momento… ¿Pero acaso era popular en Inglaterra?
No, nunca fue popular aquí, pero generalmente siempre estaba grabando en Londres. Y esas sesiones fueron fantásticas, porque estaba Ringo (N. Starr) en batería. Bueno, en algunas partes. Peter Frampton también estuvo en aquellas sesiones, Gary Wright de Spooky Tooth… Por lo que pude conocer a todos estos músicos haciendo el álbum, y además me hice muy amigo de Peter Frampton. Y eso me llevó a continuar y trabajar con él.

DELICIAS DE UN PRODUCTOR
Siempre me pregunté qué resulta más fácil, si ser un productor de discos, o un mezclador de sonido. Digo, si tuvieras que elegir una actividad…
Si tuviera que elegir una, me gusta el proceso de grabar. Crear climas, y trabajar con una banda discutiendo los arreglos. No lo de mezclar, preferiría estar grabando o produciendo. Digo, disfruto de mezclar también. Creo que elegiría mezclar cosas ahora, las que nunca grabé… Quiero decir, acabo de terminar un álbum con Peter Perrett, y desde el primer momento me dije “no quiero mezclar esto”. Prefiero que lo mezcle otra persona.

De hecho hiciste más grabaciones que mezclas a lo largo de tu carrera.
No tengo idea, no lo sé. Digo, generalmente mezclo lo que antes grabé.

¿Tenés la posibilidad de elegir al artista con el que vas a trabajar, ya sea como productor o mezclador? Quiero decir, ¿podés decirle que sí o no a alguien? ¿O tenés que seguir las órdenes de Olympic?
Sí, ahora puedo hacerlo. Con Olympic, no. Siempre se trató de trabajar con quienes ellos decían.

9El artista que fuera…
Sí, el que fuera. Pero lo que fue extraño es que no me quedé mucho tiempo trabajando para Olympic. Después de esa sesión con Johnny Halliday, hice algunos álbumes con Ten Years After. Todavía era ingeniero en Olympic.

¿El disco “Watt”?
No, el más grande, “A Space In Time”, que fue uno de mis discos favoritos. Creo que fui ingeniero en Olympic sólo por un año, y después de eso, tenía tanto trabajo que pensé “me voy a hacer freelance y trabajar a mi manera”. Y lo hice. ¡Pero aún seguía trabajando aquí todo el tiempo! (Risas) La gente me buscaba para que trabajase con ellos, y afortunadamente se acercaban los mejores, o bien eran buena gente.

¿Cómo te las arreglabas para tener tiempo de trabajar para Olympic, y también de modo freelance?
Como dije antes, habré estado trabajando como ingeniero en Olympic por un año, y después decidí irme. Pero de todas formas los artistas querían grabar aquí y Olympic no tenía problema con que un ingeniero de afuera trabajase en sus estudios. Y lo mismo sucedió con Glyn. El motivo por el que Glyn vino a Olympic, o uno de los motivos, era que Abbey Road no permitía ingenieros de afuera. Muchos de los estudios no lo permitían, tenías que ser un ingeniero que trabajase en el lugar. Y Olympic no tenía esa regla, por lo que fue uno de los primeros estudios en habilitar a ingenieros freelance.

Tu primer trabajo con bandas de rock fue recién en 1970, ¿verdad? Me refiero al álbum “Led Zeppelin III” y a “Watt” de Ten Years After, como ingeniero, y finalmente como operador de cinta para “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!” de los Stones. Siendo éste el lugar donde comenzaste tu carrera, ¿esos discos representaron un punto de partida fácil o difícil? Digo, te tocó trabajar con Zeppelin y los Stones en el mismo año…
Bueno, no fue nada difícil. Esos artistas no eran importantes para mí, teniendo en cuenta los antecedentes musicales que yo disfrutaba, o de dónde venía. Hubiera estado muy nervioso si me hubiera tocado trabajar con Nat King Cole o Frank Sinatra. Aún hoy en día, esos son mis ídolos. Pero respecto a los Stones, su música de aquel momento era algo así como decir “OK, está bien, interesante…”. ¿Zeppelin? “OK, es interesante…” Asimismo ese tipo de música era algo muy nuevo, material muy innovador, y realmente no te dabas cuenta que estabas trabajando en algo que iba a renovar la escena, si bien creo que es algo que podía sentirse así más con Zeppelin que con los Stones. La cuestión con Zeppelin era toda la mística que tenían alrededor, una cosa más grande que la mismísima banda.

¿Recordás con exactitud como fue ese primer momento en que te encontraste con los miembros de los Stones y Led Zeppelin, aquella primera vez en que los viste en persona? Supongo que estabas muy relajado, ya que no se trataba de Cole o de Sinatra.Bueno, no fue nada difícil. Esos artistas no eran importantes para mí, teniendo en cuenta los antecedentes musicales que yo disfrutaba, o de dónde venía. Hubiera estado muy nervioso si me hubiera tocado trabajar con Nat King Cole o Frank Sinatra. Aún hoy en día, esos son mis ídolos. Pero respecto a los Stones, su música de aquel momento era algo así como decir “OK, está bien, interesante…”. ¿Zeppelin? “OK, es interesante…” Asimismo ese tipo de música era algo muy nuevo, material muy innovador, y realmente no te dabas cuenta que estabas trabajando en algo que iba a renovar la escena, si bien creo que es algo que podía sentirse así más con Zeppelin que con los Stones. La cuestión con Zeppelin era toda la mística que tenían alrededor, una cosa más grande que la mismísima banda.

¿Recordás con exactitud como fue ese primer momento en que te encontraste con los miembros de los Stones y Led Zeppelin, aquella primera vez en que los viste en persona? Supongo que estabas muy relajado, ya que no se trataba de Cole o de Sinatra.
Sí, fue aquí. Estaba simplemente relajado y haciendo mi trabajo.

¿Te resultaron agradables?
No recuerdo que ninguno fuera… Ninguno se comportó como un idiota. Sí, eran agradables, ¡muy agradables!

Habrá sido una sensación natural, desde el momento en que no te sentías subordinado a los músicos.
Sí, uno se sentía parte del equipo. Es algo en equipo, así que… Podías llegar a ver alguna discusión entre la banda y el productor, o entre la banda y el ingeniero, pero era sólo eso. Pero peleas, lo que se dice “peleas”, realmente no.

11

1971, los estudios Olympic y una histórica postal con varios héroes: de la izquierda hacia el centro, los músicos distinguibles son el baterista Ringo Starr, el bajista Klaus Voormann, el guitarrista Peter Green de Fleetwood Mac y Steve Marriott en armónica, todos antes del mismísimo B.B.King, de camisa y corbata. B.B. King (de camisa y corbata, al centro)

LO MEJOR DE DOS MUNDOS
Al año siguiente, en 1971, hiciste el disco de B.B. King “In London”…
Sí, B.B. King haciendo sesiones en el Estudio Dos. Creo que no duró más de dos días. No lo recuerdo muy bien, es por eso que creo que no fuera algo que haya durado toda una semana. Fue un trabajo rápido. Definitivamente no era consciente de quién era B.B. King en aquel momento.

Pero ese mismo año trabajaste con los Stones en “Sticky Fingers”, a quienes ya habías conocido. El disco fue grabado aquí en Olympic, y después continuó en los estudios Trident, y también en Muscle Shoals, en Alabama. Siendo un álbum clave en la historia del rock and roll, ¿tenés algún recuerdo en especial de aquellos días? ¿Queda algo por decir?
No, creo que ya fue todo dicho. Pero recuerdo la sesión de cuerdas para la canción “Moonlight Mile” con Paul Buckmaster. Recuerdo que se hizo en los estudios Basing Street. No se hizo aquí. En verdad creo que esa fue la primera vez en que realmente sentí el poder de un arreglo orquestal en la música rock. ¡Porque su arreglo en la canción era absolutamente impresionante! Escuchar la orquesta de por sí fue algo muy hermoso. Si bien yo ya había grabado una orquesta con Del Newman para Ten Years After, que era mucho más chica, el arreglo en “Moonlight Mile” fue realmente grandioso.

12

Tony Visconti y Chris Kimsey: ahí donde los ven, con esas pintas, son dos leyendas de la música popular

Fue ahí entonces cuando la orquesta y el rock and roll se juntaron, y posiblemente cuando comenzaste a interesarte en el género.
Bueno, acabo de terminar un álbum que tiene orquesta por todas partes. No es rock’n’roll, es más rhythm and blues, R&B de la vieja escuela. Pero esta vez traje a Tony Visconti, lo saqué de la jubilación. Tampoco es que Tony se haya jubilado completamente. No mucha gente sabe que Tony es un excelente arreglador orquestal, y escritor, y director… Hace de todo. Y yo lo sabía. Nos conocimos hace tres años, poco antes de que David (N. Bowie) falleciera. Nos volvimos muy buenos amigos. Así que cuando le pedí orquestar este álbum, respondió como diciendo “¿De verdad? Bueno, ¡sí!”, e hizo un trabajo increíble. También volví a tener a Paul Buckmaster para trabajar en una canción, que fue muy bueno, pero lo de Tony fue absolutamente maravilloso.Fue ahí entonces cuando la orquesta y el rock and roll se juntaron, y posiblemente cuando comenzaste a interesarte en el género.

¿Fuiste vos quien los recomendó para las sesiones de “Sticky Fingers”?
¿Para los Stones? No. No sé quién pudo haber sido, realmente.

Paul Buckmaster también grabó en “Sway”
Sí, también en “Sway”. No sé de dónde provino la conexión. Estoy casi seguro que fue algo que vino por el lado de Mick(N. Jagger), no es algo que pudiera haber venido del lado de Keith (N. Richards)

A través de los años trabajaste con grandes nombres de la historia de Olympic, como George Chkiantz, Glyn Johns, Roger Savage, Eddie Kramer, Jimmy Miller… ¿Algún recuerdo de ellos?
Nunca trabajé con Eddie. Lo conocía, pero jamás trabajé con él. Jimmy Miller era un productor genial y un gran generador de climas, y tenía un oído maravilloso para la percusión. Jimmy hacía que todo el mundo se sintiese bien, y si había un problema, siempre sabía cómo resolverlo y lograr que la energía continuara fluyendo y manteniéndose. Fue un buen hombre.

Pasemos  a 1973, cuando estuviste junto a Emerson, Lake and Palmer en el disco “Brain Salad Surgery”, y también en “Camel” de Peter Frampton.
Con ELP, sí. Pero no hice el de Peter, ese fue Eddie Kramer. Pero en cuanto a la banda, fue un montón de diversión, disfruté haciéndolo. Quería trabajar con ellos, así que fue genial cuando me llamaron para hacerlo.

Y en 1974 fuiste productor e ingeniero de “Monkey Grip” de Bill Wyman, que fue el primer trabajo solista de un integrante de los Rolling Stones.
Es verdad, el de Bill fue el primero, sí. No creo que haya sido productor en ese disco, pienso que sólo mezclé algo, porque la mayor parte del disco se hizo en Estados Unidos, supongo. Bill siempre estaba en Olympic. Si no estaba haciendo un disco solista, estaba trabajando con una banda llamada The End, e hice de ingeniero en algo de eso. Entonces Bill venía aquí a hacer diferentes cosas fuera de los Stones. Y pidió trabajar conmigo, o con Keith Harwood, que era otro de los ingenieros en Olympic. Con Keith éramos amigos muy cercanos. Keith grabó muchísimo con Led Zeppelin, y también hizo “Black And Blue” con los Stones.

13De hecho hay unas palabras dedicadas a él en la contratapa del disco en vivo “Love You Live”…
Sí. Murió en un accidente de auto al regresar de Stargroves, la casa de Mick.

KIMSEY LLEGA VIVO!
En 1976 trabajaste en “Frampton Comes Alive”, el clásico de Peter Frampton, que es uno de los discos en vivo más vendidos de todos los tiempos. ¿Imaginabas, o lo hacía Peter, que iba a terminar convirtiéndose en semejante éxito?
No. Quiero decir, sabíamos que era bueno porque, al mezclarlo, podías tener esa sensación de euforia al escucharlo. Y eso es porque fue el público quien realmente hizo ese disco. Podés sentir la comunicación con la audiencia. Se comentaba que le habíamos agregado más sonido de audiencia a la grabación original, pero no hicimos nada de eso. Quedó exactamente como era. Nada de arreglos, nada de agregados. Grabé dos conciertos para el álbum, y Eddie también grabó algo, y hubo otros. Yo grabé menos que los demás, pero hice la mezcla de todo. ¡Y me divertí tanto mezclándolo! Me acuerdo del flanger, que acababa de inventarse. Lo usé en el piano Fender Rhodes, en la canción “Do You Feel”, en el solo de Bobby Mayo. Sí, fue todo muy divertido, pero cuando terminábamos de mezclar el álbum, ya que el presupuesto era bajo, -solamente mezclamos un solo disco-, luego apareció Jerry Moss junto a Dee Anthony, el manager de Peter, para agregar playback. Entonces hicimos playback de lo mezclado en uno solo de los álbumes, y Jerry dijo, “¿dónde está el resto?” Y le dijimos que el manager de Peter nos había dicho que solamente podíamos hacer un solo disco –“nadie quiere un disco doble”, nos dijo- y Jerry le contestó “no, tenés que hacer un álbum doble, el show completo”. Así que volvimos y mezclamos el resto del álbum.

14¡Y de repente se volvió un éxito descomunal!
Así fue. Casi terminó siendo un único disco. Es aún hoy día un gran álbum para escuchar. Sé que Peter lo remezcló hace algunos años. No he escuchado la remezcla, no veo que sea necesario hacerlo (Risas). Habíamos tenido una discusión sobre todos esos discos que son remezclados, álbumes clásicos que son remezclados una y otra vez, y me pregunto, ¿por qué? ¿Para qué remasterizarlos, cuando es algo que se puede hacer bien desde el principio?

Desde ya. Si está bien, ¿para qué tocarlo, no?
Exactamente. Muchas de las remasterizaciones se hacen porque las compañías discográficas creen que van a volver a venderlos, pero la mayoría de ellas, al remasterizarlas, las arruinan. No suenan tan bien como las originales.

15

La foto hay que verla con lupa, pero vale la pena: un joven Frampton vestido de blanco y un joven Kimsey toqueteando la consola producen el ultraexitoso “Frampton Comes Alive!”

De alguna forma, las compañías tienen que decirle al público “tenés que comprarte esta versión, porque está remasterizada”. Probablemente ese sea el truco para volver a vender el disco.
El tema con las remasterizaciones es que, la mayoría de las veces, ni siquiera se lo consultan al productor o al ingeniero, directamente van y lo hacen. Hay una remasterización del álbum “Some Girls” de los Stones que es horripilante. ¡Fue terrible, realmente terrible! Seis meses después de editarse, el público lo dijo en los comentarios en la página de Amazon, “ésta es la peor…”. Entonces contacté al management de los Stones, y me dijeron, “bueno, en la crítica de Rolling Stone le dieron 5 estrellas”. Realmente no les importa.

Por lo que recuerdo, es Mick Jagger quien suele ordenar que se remastericen de esa manera. A fin de cuentas, pienso que todo lo que él quiere es no volver al pasado. Porque Mick odia la nostalgia.
A Mick no le gusta volver atrás en lo más mínimo. Sí, ¡absolutamente! Si bien sinceramente tengo que decir que todo eso de seguir haciendo giras y conciertos es muy notable. Y el resto de las bandas también se mantiene bien. Volviendo a lo de los discos, hay solamente dos álbumes que fueron remasterizados y que suenan mejor. Uno es “Misplaced Childhood” de Marillion. El sonido original era muy bueno, pero el tipo que lo orquestó, Simon Wilson, que trabajaba para la EMI, y realmente amaba lo que estaba haciendo, apreciaba lo que podía salir mal. Así que estuvo atento a toda esa cosa de la remasterización. Y él también estuvo a cargo de remasterizar el álbum “Mama Africa” de Peter Tosh. Por lo que a veces puede resultar bien, pero aún pienso en cuál es el punto de hacerlo, si ya suena bien. Es más que nada un asunto de ventas de parte de la compañía grabadora.

Pareciera ser que sólo se trata de ponerle una calcomanía en la tapa anunciando eso de que es una “versión remasterizada”, sugiriendo que tenés que tenerlo.
Sí, deberían poner una diciendo, “ahora en mono” (Risas)

16COMO UN ROLLING STONE
Ya que estamos, hablando de los Stones y las versiones remasterizadas, antes de que co-produjeras algunos de sus discos, en 1978 fuiste ingeniero en la grabación original de “Some Girls”. Siempre se dijo que hubo muchos problemas con Keith durante la grabación del álbum, ya que nunca aparecía en el estudio cuando se suponía que debía hacerlo. ¿Cómo te arreglabas con la manera en que manejaba sus tiempos?
Bueno, de todas formas nos la pasábamos esperando que aparezcan todos, no sólo Keith… Keith terminaba viniendo, pero aún estaba con su problema de adicción, entonces se iba al baño y desaparecía por quizás una hora y nos quedábamos esperándolo. Mick realmente fue de mucho apoyo para con Keith en ese momento, sabía lo que Keith estaba pasando, conocía esa presión. También sabía que si no lo sobrellevaba, los Stones no podían continuar. Pienso que también existió un motivo ulterior. No lo desechaba, ni se quejaba de él. Realmente lo estaba ayudando. Fue bueno poder ser testigo de esa amistad.

17

Kimsey y Keith Richards en 1969, durante la mezcla de “Get Yer Ya-Ya´s Out!”

Bueno, ahora sí que finalmente estabas metido de lleno en el rock’n’roll. Y apenas dos años después trabajaste como productor asociado e ingeniero de mezcla en el álbum “Emotional Rescue” en el mismo estudio de París, en Pathé Marconi. Existen muchísimos outtakes (N.: Toma alternativa o no finalizada de una canción) de las sesiones de “Some Girls” y de “Emotional Rescue”…
Sí, mucho del material que no apareció en “Some Girls” terminó en “Emotional Rescue”, y otras cosas que sobraron fueron a parar a “Tattoo You”.

Bueno, ahora sí que finalmente estabas metido de lleno en el rock’n’roll.
Tal cual. En verdad, de alguna manera “Some Girls” fue uno de los álbumes más fáciles de grabar en el sentido de que, cuando yo entraba a la sala del estudio, sabía exactamente cómo ubicar a la banda y el sonido que quería obtener. Puse un pequeño amplificador arriba, así uno podía escuchar el tambor y el bombo de Charlie (N. Watts), porque no querían usar mucho los auriculares. Y también para amplificar la voz de Mick, porque yo sentía que eran una banda en vivo. En el estudio, uno no quiere restringirlos. Querés darle la posibilidad de que sientan que están tocando en un club, que están tocando en vivo. Así que el plan que ideé para el estudio funcionó bien. La consola anduvo perfectamente, y también la cabina de control, porque era muy chica, no entraban más de tres personas en ella. Fue algo bastante extraño, a decir verdad, porque fue la primera vez que me pedían que grabara un álbum entero, las sesiones completas. Mick y Keith raramente venían a la cabina de control, creo que vinieron un par de veces en los primeros dos o tres días, y sólo se ponían a escuchar, no dijeron nada sobre el sonido. Y así fue. Lo dejaron todo en mis manos. Continué haciendo lo que quería hacer dentro del estudio, y también afuera, ya que también di una mano con los sonidos de guitarra, principalmente en el volumen. O tal vez con un pedal.

Supongo que para entonces ya te habías ganado toda su confianza.
Sí. No me impresionaban como dioses del rock. Eran sólo un grupo de músicos. Y yo intentaba ayudarlos a capturar algo.

18

Kimsey & Wood: a pesar de los esfuerzos, fotogénico se nace, no se hace

De hecho lograste un gran sonido. Me refiero a la versión original, no a la remasterizada…
¡Sí! (Risas) El sonido de ese álbum es bastante único por la manera en que se armó el estudio, y también la consola. Fue un momento muy especial. De algún modo lo sabía. Keith también lo sabía, porque hubo un período en el cual… Se suponía que no podíamos estar en esa sala. Era la sala más barata de Pathé Marconi, con una consola EMI muy vieja. Se suponía que íbamos a usar el Estudio 2, que tenía una gran consola Neve nueva. El área de grabación era muy grande, había dos salas inmensas, pero yo amaba el sonido que obteníamos en el estudio con la consola vieja. Y Keith también. De hecho le dijimos a Mick, “no deberíamos movernos”. Porque Mick siempre estaba en eso de, ya sabés cómo es, “el futuro”.De hecho lograste un gran sonido. Me refiero a la versión original, no a la remasterizada…

Nuevamente, ¿para qué tocar las cosas cuando están bien?
No lo hicimos, gracias a Dios.

¿Contaban con tiempo ilimitado para trabajar en el estudio?
Sí, creo que lo habían reservado por dos meses, o algo así. El estudio en el que estábamos costaba la cuarta parte de lo que costaba el otro, así que funcionó bien en todo sentido.

¿Considerás que te resultó más simple trabajar en “Tattoo You”, ya que la mayor parte de las pistas originales databan de grabaciones antiguas?
Bueno, no grabamos nada en “Tattoo You”. Fue material que encontré, material que sabía que había grabado y que no había sido utilizado. Y había al menos unas cinco o seis buenas canciones. Y pensé que, si ya había encontrado buenas canciones dentro de lo que yo mismo había grabado, debía haber más material que haya quedado de otros discos. Entonces me puse a revisar el material de las sesiones de “Goats Head Soup” y de “Black And Blue”, y encontré otras gemas maravillosas.

¿Fuiste vos quien eligió las canciones que iban a integrar el disco , o fue decisión de Mick y Keith? ¿O lo decidieron entre los tres?
No, se trató más del hecho de lo que había disponible, o lo que estaba más completo, en lo referente a melodías y letras para Mick.

19¿Acaso “Heaven” no era una canción nueva?
No, fue grabada para “Some Girls”, o quizás para “Emotional Rescue”. No recuerdo para qué álbum, pero sí, eso fue en París.

Tal vez “Little T&A” sí lo era…
No logro recordar si el material que grabé venía de las sesiones de “Some Girls”, o de las de “Emotional Rescue”. Más probablemente es del primero, lo que resulta muy gracioso, porque “Emotional…” se grabó a paso más lento. No fue tan divertido como hacer “Some Girls”. La energía había cambiado. ¿Tal vez sea que Keith ya estaba “limpio” en aquel momento? Debe haberlo estado. Y se ve que de repente comenzaba a despertarse.

La más antigua de todas sea probablemente “Waiting On a Friend”…
Esa era de “Goats…”, al igual que “Tops”. Pero en “Tops” trabajó Glyn, creo. Eso fue cuando estaba en Rotterdam, con el camión móvil de grabación de los Stones.

Eventualmente estuviste allí en el momento del cambio completo que sufrió “Start Me Up”, de la versión reggae original a la final en estilo rock-pop…
Sí, una de sus más grandes canciones.

¿Entonces tu primera co-producción real con los Glimmer Twins fue en “Undercover”?
No recuerdo como salió en los créditos. “Undercover” es un álbum muy poco valorado, y pienso que es mejor que “Emotional…”. Quiero decir, lo disfruto más que al otro. Era un momento muy peligroso respecto al grupo. Porque no se daban entre ellos en absoluto. Me encantaría conseguir la versión multitrack de “Undercover”, la canción, podría usarla para enseñar, porque no se parecía a ninguna otra pista que hayamos grabado. Comenzaba con Charlie tocando el timpani y Mick en guitarra acústica, solamente ellos dos, y luego empezó a tomar forma a partir de eso. Tuve una idea muy loca a la hora de mezclarla. Me llevó dos o tres días mezclarla con todos esos sonidos grabados de fondo. Fue todo cinta, nada digital. Me encantó hacerlo, fue fabuloso.

¿También en París?
No, eso fue mezclado en New York. Fue grabado en París, y luego trabajamos en los estudios Compass Point de Bahamas, y en New York.

THE CULT & MARILLION & KILLING JOKE & ACE FREHLEY
Al año siguiente estabas trabajando en “Dreamtime”, el primer disco de The Cult.
Sí, eso fue en Berlín. Hice un montón de trabajo en Berlín. Allí hice dos de Killing Joke, en los estudios Hansa. También trabajé en uno de JoBoxer, en “Misplaced Childhood”, de Marillion, Spear Of Destiny, y con una banda llamada Eden. Creo que todo eso fue en Hansa. Adoro ese estudio.

20¿Cómo fue trabajar junto a Marillion?
Me encantó hacerlo. De hecho allí hicimos un documental, el “makingof” de “Misplaced…”. En el rodaje usamos la multitrack, la que fue fantástico escuchar en Hansa, en esa sala mágica. También estaban las notas originales de grabación que yo había escrito. Los detalles en esas hojas eran increíbles. Tenía que estar muy bien clasificado, porque era un álbum conceptual. “Canción-continuar con la canción-canción-continuar con la canción…”. Todo eso de manera continua en un rollo de cinta. Realmente tenías que planearlo con anticipación, así todo tenía correlación, y de esa forma no había cosas diferentes que terminaban estando en distintas pistas. Tenía que ser algo muy calculado. Y es muy asombroso ver lo que hice. Incluso la banda dijo, “bueno, esto es increíble, jamás supimos que fuiste vos quien había hecho eso, ¡suena realmente bien!”. Fue el álbum más barato que hice alguna vez, y el que más vendió de todos.

¿Trabajar con Marillion te resultó hacerlo más con el estilo de música que te gustaba? Algo así como “alejémonos un poco del rock’n’roll y trabajemos con gente realmente seria”…
(Risas) Sí, realmente lo fue. Bueno, los Stones son más blues que rock and roll, quiero decir, Zeppelin y los Stones, no son lo mismo para nada. A ambas se les dice “rock’n’roll”. Los Stones se acercaban a algo más suave. Bueno, no exactamente algo “más suave”, no son las palabras indicadas. Sí, es algo diferente, ¿o no? Pero Marillion era algo más teatral y cinemático. Me encantó muchísimo trabajar con ellos, y me gusto su música. También me gustaba Killing Joke, que es exactamente lo opuesto (Risas) Eso sí que es rock’n’roll para mí, es rock’n’roll pesado. Pero fijate como son las cosas, en Killing Joke había un elemento orquestal de composición en la manera de componer de Jaz Coleman, en el teclado, en sus composiciones… Eso permitía un gran tipo de sonido.

¿No fue Coleman quien también hizo los arreglos de “Symphonic Music Of The Rolling Stones”, el álbum con versiones sinfónicas de los Stones en el que trabajaste?
Sí, fue él. Lo hizo en cuatro o cinco canciones. La versión de “Angie” es extraordinaria. Amo ese álbum. Le dieron 5 estrellas en el sitio de Amazon. Un disco hermoso. La compañía grabadora realmente lo arruinó, no sabían cómo publicitarlo. Lo entendieron mejor con discos que salieron después.

¿Te preparás por adelantado de alguna manera según el estilo musical con el que vas a trabajar? Digo, pasaste de los Stones a Marillion a Killing Joke…
¡Y después al reggae!

¡Y después al reggae!
Bueno, realmente amo el reggae. Me encantan todos los tipos de música, si bien no me gusta Metallica. ¿Podría trabajar con Metallica? No, creo que no podría hacerlo. Eso me volvería loco. Pero hubo un caso con otra banda norteamericana muy heavy, ¿cómo se llamaban? Eran muy grandes. Tuve que decirles que “no”. Es un nombre de una sola palabra…

¿Slayer? ¿Anthrax?
¡Tool! Eran grandes. Una banda masiva. Recibí un llamado de ellos cuando estaba trabajando con los Gypsy Kings. (Risas) Y yo estaba así como… ¡intentando hacer mis observaciones como productor de Tool mientras trabajaba con los Gypsy Kings! Fue muy loco.

Ya que estamos, después de Marillion trabajaste con Ace Frehley en el álbum “Frehley’s Comet”. Eso sí que debe haber sido divertido.
Bueno, no hice mucho en ese disco. Se dio por mi amistad con Bill Aucoin. Ace estaba muy arruinado, y precisaba ayuda.

Parece que ya está “limpio” después de todos estos años…
A veces me llaman para trabajar con artistas que resultan ser imposibles, o que generalmente están hechos pelota. Pero si puedo abrirme paso y llegar a su corazón y a su alma, entonces lo hago. Si no tengo esa conexión, no puedo hacerlo, entonces.

¿Y cómo te las arreglás si no lográs esa conexión?
Bueno, entonces no trabajo con ellos. Como dije antes, acabo de terminar un álbum solista de Peter Perrett, de The Only Ones.

Sí, los recuerdo perfectamente, los de “Another Girl, Another Planet”…
Sí. Pero Peter tuvo una severa adicción a la heroína durante 25 años. No puedo creer que aún esté vivo. Está limpio desde hace siete años, pero en estos siete años hubo tantos demonios y problemas, porque sus hijos están en su grupo… Sufrieron todo tipo de abusos de sus padres, siendo éstos drogadictos durante toda su vida. Aunque fui muy feliz haciendo el álbum, y lo que fue realmente encantador –y esto es en lo que pienso que soy bueno, y lo que me recompensa- es que llegó un punto en que Peter dijo “no puedo creer que esté trabajando con vos, porque confío en absolutamente todo lo tuyo”. Y recibir algo así de un artista es algo maravilloso. No se trata de si pasaron una crisis en su vida, o si no. Es agradable cuando obtenés eso de un artista sano también. Es un álbum maravilloso, y estoy muy orgulloso de él.

22LAS AVENTURAS DE PETER TOSH
OK, volviendo a las preguntas…
¡De vuelta al futuro, o al pasado! (Risas)

Me encanta eso de “volver al pasado”. Trabajaste con Peter Tosh en el disco “Mama Africa”. ¿Cómo fue esa experiencia? ¿Disfrutaste haciéndolo?
No, era un idiota. Amaba su voz. Tuvimos una relación extraña en el estudio, porque Peter no tenía respeto por nadie, más que por él mismo. ¡Ni siquiera por los músicos! Entonces él llegaba al estudio, tocaba tres o cuatro canciones, todo muy simple. Todos las aprendían, y después él decía, “¡OK, voy a salir a comprar algo de pescado frito!”, y desaparecía, y regresaba al atardecer para ver si ya habíamos hecho lo nuestro. Terminábamos las canciones, y después él solo grababa la parte vocal encima. Adoraba su voz pero, como persona, no era un hombre muy agradable.

Sabía que era un tipo complicado, pero jamás imaginé que fuera tan difícil trabajar con él.
Bueno, no era realmente difícil, ¡porque nunca estaba! ¡Eso era lo mejor de todo! (Risas) En oposición a Jimmy Cliff, que era todo lo contrario. Trabajar con Jimmy era como trabajar con un ángel, siendo él un tipo tan maravilloso.

Bueno, supongo que Peter a veces estaba ahí, pero al mismo tiempo no estaba, digo, siempre estaba muy “colgado”…
Sí. Y hay una historia famosa con Donald Kinsey, el guitarrista del grupo Chicago, que estaba en el álbum. Ambos teníamos la idea de que Peter grabara una versión de “Johnny B. Goode”, la canción de Chuck Berry. Entonces, una mañana se la hice escuchar a Peter, y me dijo “me no sing no white man song” (N. “no canto canciones del hombre blanco”, con acento jamaiquino). Y al otro día le traje una foto de Chuck Berry, diciéndole “Este es el hombre que escribió ‘Johnny B. Goode’”.

¿Cómo, Tosh no conocía a Chuck?
No, no lo conocía. Y entonces me dijo, “him brother, me do the song!” (“él es un hermano, voy a hacer la canción”) (Risas) Y la hizo muy bien. Le cambió la letra, que es algo que me encantó.

Pero Tosh tenía una gran voz…
Una voz maravillosa, sí. Y también hubo canciones geniales en el disco. Todavía me encanta ese disco, me encantan canciones como “Glass House” (Se pone a cantarla) … fue un gran cantante. Y conocí un montón de músicos que trabajaron en ese álbum, como Sticky Thompson, o el tecladista Phil Ramacon, que vive en Londres. Sólo hice una sesión con él, y no lo veo desde entonces. Por lo que resultó algo maravilloso.

En 1989 realizaste otra co-producción con los Stones en el disco “Steel Wheels”, que marcó un tipo de sonido diferente dentro de la carrera del grupo.
Así es. Fue algo distinto en el sentido de que pude tener un control más amplio. No sé si esa es la palabra exacta. Había tenido una visión sobre un sonido para todo el álbum, que me decía que tenía que ser algo más rico, más suntuoso. No tan crudo como el de “Exile On Main Street”, y no tan sucio como el de “Some Girls”. Realmente quería un sonido gordo y cálido a lo largo de toda la producción.

Suena definitivamente limpio y pulido, más metálico.
Sí, limpio y pulido. Fue hecho para sonar así. Todo el asunto con los arreglos y los coros. Fue algo más similar a “un álbum producido”, y estuve realmente feliz con la manera en que resultó, porque antes de empezarlo ya sabía que quería que sonara así. Porque ya estaba pensando en el próximo álbum, tenía la idea de hacer otro “Exile…”. Quería que el próximo fuera completamente lo contrario. Pero pensé que, siendo así, antes tenía que haber un disco de los Stones con un nuevo sonido. No creo que haya otro álbum de los Stones que suene como “Steel Wheels”, pero de eso se trataba ese shock, porque después de ahí se iba a tratar de volver a sonar más sucios.

Y, ya que estamos, acabo de acordarme de “Let’s Go Steady”, la canción inédita de las sesiones de “Emotional Rescue” que…
(Interrumpe) ¡El dúo de Keith y mi esposa!

Siempre fue uno de mis outtakes favoritos. ¿Cómo es que eso sucedió?
Es algo muy dulce. ¡A ella le encantaría escuchar lo que estás diciendo! En realidad, fue grabada en los estudios Compass Point, en Nassau. Mi esposa Kristi viajaba conmigo a todas partes, al menos antes que nacieran mis hijos. Creo que eran como las 2 o 3 de la mañana, y Keith dijo, “hey, buscá a Kristi, decile que venga, quiero que cante en esta canción”.

Recuerdo haber leído que ella dijo “no”, porque le resultaba mejor cantarla de día.¿Dijo que no? No lo recuerdo (Risas). Al menos no en este momento. Pero de todas formas, lo hizo después. Creo que lo hicieron todo en una sola toma. ¡Los dos cantando en vivo juntos! Fue muy entretenido.

Y Mick, mientras tanto, estaba fuera de escena.
¡No creo que Mick haya estado siquiera en la isla! (Risas)

¡Y ella lo hizo muy bien!
¡Lo hizo realmente bien! ¡Muy pero muy bien! Digo, ella no tuvo tiempo para aprender la canción. Fue como si siempre hubieran cantado juntos. Resultó ser algo muy especial. También fue muy instrumental a la hora de ayudar a Keith a terminar “Slipping Away”. Keith había tenido en mente eso de “slipping away, slipping away, slipping away…” al menos por dos años. Solamente esa frase. Pero no tenía el resto. Y entonces una noche estábamos cenando en la casa de Keith en Montserrat, y él la estaba tocando, y Kristi comenzó a cantar algo diferente, lo que llevó a Keith a otra cosa, y así fue como pudo terminar la canción.

Adoro esa canción.
Sí, es una canción encantadora: “First the sun and then the moon…”

EL FINAL ES EN DONDE PARTÍ
Al principio de la entrevista hablábamos de Guy Bailey y de Thirsty. En 1992 ya habías trabajado con los Quireboys en el álbum “Bitter Sweet And Twisted”, que fue el segundo con la formación original, cuando Guy todavía estaba en el grupo.
¡Oh, eso fue una pesadilla! Heredé el disco, lo recibí de manos de Bob Rock, que justo estaba haciendo la producción de la canción “King Of New York”. Bob había comenzado a producir y grabar el disco, pero es como que un momento se apartó. Supongo que alguien le habrá ofrecido más dinero para otro proyecto, así que se alejó y lo abandonó, y me cayó a mí. Y lo que digo será horrible, pero sí es así, es porque Bob lo grabó. Fue en la época en que teníamos máquinas digitales Sony, y Bob había conectado tres máquinas de 48 canales cada una para la grabación. Entonces, una de las máquinas estaba repleta de solos de guitarra, lo que significaba que yo iba a tener que analizar 48 tomas diferentes de guitarra. Todo el álbum era así. Todo había sido reemplazado, y reemplazado, y reemplazado nuevamente, y me llevó toda una semana hacerlo, porque lo que yo quería hacer era encontrar la grabación original, o al menos dónde había comenzado, y me llevó todo ese tiempo lograrlo, lo que resultó una pesadilla.

Pero así y todo, te gustaba la banda.
Sí, me gustaba el grupo. Me gustaba Spike, y me gustaba Guy.

23Al año siguiente trabajaste en “Full Moon, Dirty Hearts” con INXS. No hace falta decir que Michael Hutchence era un cantante prominente, y toda una estrella. ¿Alguna anécdota de esos tiempos?
Sí, eso se hizo aquí. Michael era un hombre encantador. Fue uno de las personas más gentiles con las que trabajé alguna vez, realmente. En especial, le pedí que cantara en el álbum “Symphonic Stones”, yo quería que él haga “Under My Thumb”. Y Michael se subió al proyecto, estaba encantado de hacerlo. Aparte era muy divertido trabajar con él en el estudio, muy rápido y muy inteligente. Muy agradable, me llevaba realmente bien con él. Como anécdota extra, una noche, en la época que él todavía salía con la modelo Helena Christensen, me pidió, “¿podrías cuidar a Helena por mí?”. Por supuesto, ningún problema (Risas) Michael era un tipo dulce y encantador. Cuando trabajamos en ese álbum, fue algo bastante extraño, porque había conocido a la banda antes en París, cuando yo estaba haciendo un disco de los Stones, y entonces nos juntamos con INXS, y me hicieron escuchar algo así como la mitad del futuro disco. Pensé que eran todos demos, porque todo sonaba muy poco convincente. Sonaba áspero. Y yo les dije, “va a ser muy bueno el día que lo graben de manera correcta”. A lo que ellos me contestaron, “ya fue grabado de manera correcta” “Oh!” (Risas) Me dijeron, “¿pensás que deberíamos hacerlo de nuevo?” Entonces así fue que vinimos aquí, a Olympic, y lo grabamos. Hicimos ese dúo de Michael con Chrissie Hynde, lo que fue algo muy loco. Cuando ella llegó al estudio, ya estábamos grabando la parte vocal, el dúo mismo, y ella dijo “voy a salir un rato a hacer unas compras”, y se fue por 5 horas. Chrissie sufre de “miedo a los estudios”. Odia estar en un estudio de grabación. Así que vino, dio un vistazo, escuchó y se fue.

Tal vez esa sea la razón por la que siempre demora en grabar un disco.
Quizás. Cinco horas, eso fue toda una exageración, pero después fue una gran hora y media (Risas) Imaginate la situación, “¿adónde se fue Chrissie?”

En 1995 volviste a trabajar con los Stones en el álbum “Stripped”, y también con los Chieftains en “The Long Black Veil”.
Oh, sí. Ya había estado trabajando con los Chieftains, porque me había hecho muy buen amigo de su manager Steve Macklan, ya que antes había trabajado con el canadiense Colin James, produciendo dos de sus álbumes. Entonces conocí a Paddy Moloney a través de esa conexión. Y después, sí, trabajé en el álbum, que contó con muchos invitados. Los cuatro Stones, Sting en una canción, Bono en otra… Recuerdo ir a una reunión con Paddy y Mick Jagger en Irlanda, para que discutamos qué canción grabar para el disco. Fue en esa ocasión que Paddy quedó asombrado cuando Mick le dijo que conocía la canción “The Rocky Road To Dublin”. No se imaginaba que Mick pudiera ser así. Hice un par de cosas junto a The Chieftains. Y aparte, algo muy triste, el arpista de la banda, Derek Bell, muy talentoso, había fallecido, y ellos hicieron un álbum tributo en vivo que yo después mezclé junto a Paddy.

En 1996 habrá significado todo un cambio para vos cuando, después de ese llamado, finalmente trabajaste junto a los Gypsy Kings en su disco “Compas”
Eso fue entretenido. Lo disfruté mucho, porque mi espíritu para ese álbum era el de no incluir instrumentos de viento, o batería. Sólo quería a los Gypsy Kings. Pero incluí a Pino Palladino para que toque algo de bajo, y a Jon Carin en algunos teclados. Me divertí muchísmo haciendo ese disco. El problema fue que su mánager, Claude Martínez, es como que tenía más preponderancia sobre la banda que los mismos Gypsy Kings. Es un hombre de negocios muy perspicaz. Pero puso mucha atención en la manera que escribían, porque en eso eran muy malos. Ellos llegaban y tocaban una canción. Le cambiaban la velocidad original, después que se la habían robado de otra melodía que habían escuchado en la radio. Entonces la escuchaban y la querían hacer así, y él les decía, “no, no podés hacer eso, sea lo que sea”. Así que él era muy bueno. De otra forma, se la hubieran pasado en la Corte todo el tiempo.

Quisiera saber sobre tu trabajo junto a Ray Davies hace unos 10 años, en 2007, precisamente. Ya conocemos la fama que tiene Ray, pero ¿fue realmente difícil trabajar con él?
Sí, él fue muy difícil, ¡pero muy interesante! Tengo mucha empatía por Ray. Lo vi hace poco tiempo, porque estuve trabajando en el álbum de Peter Perrett en su estudio, Konk Studios. Es muy encantador, se acercó a decir “hola”, lo que fue muy agradable de su parte. Pero lo dominan sus demonios. Creo que llega un punto en la carrera solista de alguien, en la que siempre se vuelven temerosos de editar algo. Porque obviamente quieren que hagan lo que hagan resulte de modo exitoso, y pienso que eso es algo erróneo. Creo que deberían simplemente lanzarlo. Y una vez que empiezan a ponerse en guardia y preocuparse, se anticipan, y eso nunca es bueno. Entonces, respecto al álbum que hice con Ray, él después lo regrabó, creo, dos veces más. Siguió haciéndolo con gente diferente. Pero sí, es un tipo encantador. Lo que más me asombró, de hecho las que fueron las dos experiencias más increíbles que tuve con Ray, fue cuando me preguntó, “¿qué guitarra acústica debería usar? ¿Debería usar ésta, que es en la que escribí ‘Lola’?”. Y yo le contesté, “Sí, creo que deberías usarla”. Pero después de eso, en cuanto a la parte vocal, grabamos la pista correspondiente, y entonces él después grabó tres tomas más, y más tarde vino a la cabina de control para decirnos, “quiero el primer verso de la toma 3, la segunda línea del segundo verso de la toma 1, la primera línea de la toma 2…”. Y yo junté todo, como él lo quiso, y quedó perfecto. Tiene una memoria increíble. Impresionante. Ray era extraño y maravilloso.

Volviste a trabajar como empleado fijo en Olympic Studios en 2014. ¿Cómo es qué ocurrió?
Retorné a Olympic porque me hice muy amigo de los nuevos dueños, y ellos no saben mucho del negocio de la música. Lo suyo es la industria fílmica y el diseño gráfico. Estaban absolutamente encantados de conocerme, porque para ellos yo era el enlace a la historia musical de Olympic. Sabían de la herencia de Olympic como uno de los lugares con mejor sonido, y entonces también querían el mejor sonido para las salas de cine. Así que diseñé el sonido de los cines para ellos. La mayoría de los cines tienen una clase de sistema de sonido más común y disponible. Y aquí no hay nada de eso, éste es un sistema de sonido completamente único. Así que di una mano con eso, y luego se los presenté a Keith Grant, porque Keith aún vivía cuando los nuevos dueños compraron el edificio. Y también los ayudé con el libro del 50 aniversario que están haciendo. Seleccionamos 120 discos, de los 900 y pico que fueron grabados aquí, con sus tapas. Y todo eso va a ir a parar al libro. Estuve hablando con diferentes artistas, como Cat Stevens. Recibí una carta suya encantadora, y también cosas de aquí y de allá de diferentes artistas.

Debió haber resultado bastante complicado elegirlos…
Aún lo es, porque queríamos solo 100, pero no hay forma de que puedan ser menos de 120. Fue muy difícil. Cuando te ponés a pensar en todo lo que fue grabado en este edificio, es realmente ridículo. Comencé a apreciarlo y comprenderlo, te dicen dicen “¡oh, Olympic!”. Todo el mundo se excita porque sólo conocen una fracción de lo que sucedió aquí. Y entonces todo eso me llevó a discutir con los dueños lo de volver a construir un estudio aquí, que originalmente iba a ser una sala pequeña en uno de los sótanos hace un par de años, pero no pude hacerlo, porque eso no sería Olympic. Sería demasiado chico. Así que ahora estamos construyendo uno en el techo, el otro techo, no el que está sobre una de las salas de cine, que es tan grande como el de la sala 1. Ésta es una sala grande. Acabamos de terminar la primera pared a prueba de sonido, y lo próximo son los pisos flotantes, por lo que espero esté todo listo en algún momento del 2017. A eso estoy apuntando. Va a ser una tremenda alegría para mí. Y va a ser mi diseño, quiero decir, voy a estar aquí, voy a ser el mánager, y más que seguro también voy a estar trabajando en eso. Lo esperamos con muchas ansias.

¿Con qué músicos estás trabajando actualmente?
Estoy haciendo la mezcla de la última canción del álbum de Peter Perrett. Y también en un disco con Noah Johnson, otro artista con el que estuve trabajando. Ese sea tal vez uno de los mejores álbumes que alguna vez hice, estoy tan feliz con el disco… Es un álbum de soul, muy al estilo de Marvin Gaye. Noah es galés, y tiene una voz del carajo, y además es un gran escritor de canciones. Usé todo mi conocimiento. Ese es el disco que te comenté antes, en el que está Tony Visconti en cuerdas, y también Paul Buckmaster. Steve Jordan en algunas partes de batería, Jennifer Maidman en bajo, Jon Carin…Un álbum increíble. Todos mis amigos. Ahora mismo lo estamos remasterizando, debería salir a mediados del año próximo.

Aún no trabajaste con ningún artista latinoamericano, y por supuesto, sabés que tenemos mucha música ahí.
Sí, lo sé, hay mucha música y artistas increíbles. Justamente hace poco hablaba de eso, sería emocionante.

¿Existe algún artista o banda con el que nunca trabajaste, y con quien te gustaría hacerlo?
Adoro a Laura Mvula. Me encontré con ella en varias oportunidades. No creo que pudiera trabajar con ella, porque tiene su propio equipo, pero amo su trabajo. También me gustaría hacerlo con una banda llamada King King, una gran banda de blues… (piensa)

OK Chris, muchas gracias por un momento y una entrevista fantástica…
¡Oh! (interrumpe) Pete Townshend, me encantaría hacer el nuevo disco de Pete. Me encontré con él el otro día, actualmente está escribiendo las canciones. Estuvo trabajando en la parte de arriba del estudio, tuvimos una gran tarde. Fue muy divertido. Y además porque él también está en el libro de Olympic con su álbum solista “Who Came First”, y también con “Who’s Next”, que también fue hecho aquí. Pete tiene una consola que estoy pensando en poner en el estudio. Es una consola especial, y me la prestó. Es la única que hay en el Reino Unido. Eso estuvo muy bien de su parte.

24

El autor de esta nota junto a Chris Kimsey: tarea cumplida, felicidad y luces que se reflejan

Una vez más, muchísimas gracias. Si ésta no fue la mejor entrevista que hice alguna vez…
¡Oh, seguramente se lo dirás a todo el mundo! (Risas) Gracias a vos, ¡también la disfruté muchísimo!

Agradecimiento especial:  Martin Elliott

AN INTERVIEW WITH DANNY FURY: “TO ME, PUNK WAS LIKE A FIRST BREATH”

Estándar

Original article (in Spanish) published in Revista Madhouse on August 26, 2017

A few days ago we published an exclusive interview with Alan Clayton, the man behind the Dirty Strangers, which also featured Danny Fury, the band´s new drummer. Now it´s time to take a 180-degree turn and present one with Danny himself, with Alan´s participation, which also took place last November in London. How´s so? That day, both interviews were done almost at the same time, which explains why both Alan and Danny are commenting on their bandmates’ interviews. Danny Fury could be considered the quintessential drummer of the Post Punk scene.

1With an artistic background that led him to be part of a vast number of bands (mainly the last line-up of the Lords of the New Church), he now spends his time between the Tango Pirates, Danny´s last personal project, and as his role as drummer in the Dirty Strangers. But what better than him to tell his own story?

Somehow I’d thought that you’d been born in England, but I’ve just found out you were actually born in Switzerland. So how did you get to England in the first place? Were you already playing in bands in your home country?
Danny: I was already playing in bands all my life and, if you have a look at my record collection, you can see most of my favourite bands were from England.

When was that?
Danny: That was in 1984.

So what were your main influences at the time?
Danny: First bands were Hendrix, and stuff like The Sweet. All that glam stuff. Alice Cooper, you know. I also liked the Stooges and MC5, but that came a bit later, to be honest. And then came Punk, which to me was like a first breath or something, you know.

2

Danny, in the late ’80s

I remember some artists from Switzerland, but they all were mostly into Heavy Metal, like Krokus.
Danny: Well, Switzerland was always more about technical artist. There’s no inspiration coming from there. Everyone was just trying to be someone else, it seems, just like today, everybody’s trying to be someone else.

Why did you choose England and not Germany, as there was always a big rock scene there too.
Danny:
Yeah, but it’s still more or less the same, they just tried copying other things. There was After Punk for a while, where they tried to find their own stuff. Bands like Kraftwerk came out of that scene. But all in all the German or the Swiss bands were trying to copy the English bands.

Since you played with so many bands, I’d say you’re quite a quintessential drummer in relation to the Post Punk era. Starting with the Lords of the New Church.
Danny: I never thought of myself like that, but if that fits, in a way I’d say “yeah!” (laughs) But I guess there are others too. I just don’t wanna grab all the glory. But yeah, I’ve done a lot of work, that’s for sure. And I’m really passionate about doing so. Yes, people might have noticed that.

So you were in all these bands. Would you say you were just at the right time in the right place?
Danny: Well I guess I just got lucky about running into the right people. It was what it was, it could have been more too.

You were friends with the members of Hanoi Rocks. Am I wrong or you were moistly friends with Razzle?
Danny: No, I’ve actually met Razzle before he died. I was good friends with Nasty (Suicide), the main man. And we played together for a while in bands. Just before the Lords, he was gonna have a band with Stiv Bators and Dave Tregunna, you know.

Did that happen in Switzerland?
Danny: No, I was already here in London. I met Dave when he left the Lords. At the time, he was in a band called Cherry Bombz for a while, and he left them as well. And when I read that he left them, I wanted to start a whole new thing, and a friend of mine knew him, and then he introduces us. In fact, after we did a few sessions, Stiv called Dave one day and decided to do that band.

3

Rogue Male (Danny is second from left) That’s how the ’80s were like!

Which was the very first band in London you played with?
Danny: Well, the first band I was working on a professional level was Rogue Male, which was a bit more like Motörhead.

More heavy metal oriented…
Danny: Yes, quite a bit more heavy metal, you know, although it was more like rock than heavy metal. But they were supporting major bands on a major level, so I wanted to play a bit of that. And it was like going to school, you know. I learnt a lot, and then I met Dave and I was right on the track I wanted to be.

You did only one album with Rogue Male, and then came the Lords. How long did you stay in the band for?
Danny: Well, I’ve played with Dave for many years, but the actual time I was with the Lords…I thought it was longer, but now after they did some research about a film they’re doing on Stiv (“STIV: The Life and Times of A Dead Boy”), I think it’s close to 3 years.

4

Relaxing by the pool with Stiv Bators and friend (Danny on the right)

I cannot actually remember how many albums you recorded with the Lords…
Danny:
We did a live album (“Second Coming”) and then a 12” in studios, the one with a cover song, “Making Time”, which was a song by The Creation. Yeah, we covered that song.

But you sure did a lot of touring.
Danny:
Yes, and that was the main thing, it was pretty much non-stop in those days.

How was it being in a band with Stiv Bators? Was he really that wild, as always described?
Danny:
Well, as you can imagine, it was wild and crazy, never a dull moment, you know (laughs) It wasn’t definitely boring for a second.

How close you were to him? Was he friendly to be with?
Danny:
Yeah, we were in it together, because he was crazy enough, like staying up for days, you know, and I guess the others got tired. I joined the band, and they were already going for 4 or 5 years, or even 6. And I was the new boy! (laughs) But we were little brothers, you know, I think his birthday was a day after mine. So we were really close from the start. And he sort of took me under his wing, you know. He wanted to educate me into his style of rock and roll.

5So, in a way Stiv adopted you…
Danny:
Oh, I was his little brother or something, and he educated me on all sorts of things (Alan laughs)

Why are you laughing, Alan?
Alan: Because I’ve done Stiv’s last tour, the Dirty Strangers supported him. That’s how I met Danny first of all. We’ve been always friends of Brian’s and Stiv’s. And then Danny joined. We didn’t know it was Stiv’s last tour. I’m laughing because I know how it was, he was just a crazy man, a crazy lovely man.

It’s always nice to have a straight opinion about him from a bandmate.
Danny: He was very encouraging and very witty. And he just had this aura about him, you know, he was someone special, for sure. When he walked into a room he sort of commanded it without doing much. He just had that thing that some people have. Very interesting. He’s a special person in rock’n’roll.

And he’s still much loved after all these years.
Danny:
Yes, he is. Talking about Keith (Richards), I think they were friends as well. Yeah, because he was hanging around with all the punk guys when Stiv was in the Dead Boys, and Stiv told me he used to look after Marlon (Keith Richards’ son) apparently.

I believe Keith got onstage with the Dead Boys in a New York Club in 1981.
Danny:
Yeah!

6

Danny on Stiv Bators: “He was very encouraging, and very witty”

After the Lords of the New Church came Kill City Dragons, with your pal Dave Tregunna in the band as well. Do you think you got to a more professional level than what you did with the Lords?
Danny: When you say “professional”, what did you mean by all that?

I mean, maybe they were more your own kind of thing and you were more in control of all that.
Danny: No, not at all, in fact the Lords were actually my favourite band at the time, so they were exactly my thing, you know. I came to London to look for a band that was a bit like the Lords, and I ended up in the Lords so, you know.

Then why did you leave the Lords, or how else did it happen?
Danny:
Well, Stiv called it off, he broke it up.

So you never left the band, its actually the band came to an end.
Danny: Yes, Stiv told us onstage that that was it.

He did it during a show? I didn’t know that. Did you or the rest see it coming?
Danny: Yeah, that was actually our last gig, it just came out on YouTube. It’s actually cool to watch, but it’s that long story, if you don’t mind… Sort of what happened was, I was living off the gigs at the time, and they were suing everybody. There was no money coming in other than the live gigs. And then a tour was cancelled. And to cancel a tour you’ve got to have really good reasons, you know, as it costs a lot of money to set it up. And then the band needed a singer for the tour. And that made Stiv really upset, you know.

So the band was stopping, and you were looking for another singer.
Danny: Just for that tour, really. It’s not that we were thinking of replacing Stiv. But at the last minute they couldn’t do it. If he couldn’t do the tour, then we would lose a lot if cancelling it. It had nothing to do with me or Brian or all that, you know. Stiv agreed to have Dave Vanian (of The Damned ) replacing him, but I guess that was not fine with anybody. And Brian put it out in an ad, looking for someone else after Dave couldn’t do it. But he probably didn’t tell Stiv, you know. And then Stiv got really upset. And on the encore he wore a T-shirt with the ad on it. And that’s how it ended.

I know it’s a long story. I think what he was crazy about was having somebody else fronting the band after all those years.
Danny:
Yes, the communication didn’t go right, and people got upset, you know.

You were a fan of the Lords before you actually joined the band, which was your very kind of thing, and then you ended up joining the band you ever dreamt of being part of…
Danny: Yeah. I liked the while concept, the things they were saying. And their lyrics, which spoke to me, you know. Just the whole idea of what it was about, to use rock as a sort of atmosphere to a thing. All that information. And it really had that depth that sort of spoke to me. It was more profound than, say, a dance band. Something very unique as well. And a great image too. And Stiv was such a great performer, in a way like Iggy Pop, really wild.

Just like Ronnie Wood, who always thought “someday I’ll be in the Rolling Stones”
Danny:
There’s Ronnie Wood, and maybe a handful of others, but there’s not too many people in the world that would have imagined they’d end up playing in their favourite band. In fact I didn’t know if that was really happening, or if I was dreaming, you know.

Not many people get their dreams fulfilled.
Danny: It’s actually funny because I had supported the Lords at a gig before I joined them, and I talked to Stiv at the show and asked him if he knew a band in London I could join, and he said, “well, if Nicky dies, you can have his job” You know, just making fun. And it actually came true. He really liked that, he actually told the Press about that. He was really into the stars and things that aren’t meant to be, things like that. So that fit right into this.

Everything came into place.
Danny:
Yeah, he thought that was meant to be, you know.

So that’s when you thought to yourself, “ok, I’m staying in London”
Danny:
I was already here, but at the time coming to London was like coming home. It was a place where you could be yourself. Because it’s such a big place, so you can be more anonymous, you could really be yourself. Because I grew up in Switzerland.

7

Danny in his teen days

Where was that, Basel?
Danny:
Yeah. It’s one of the biggest cities in Switzerland, but it’s really a small town. So when you’re walking down the street, nobody cares, you just can be yourself. But at the time the English were kind of reserved, it was easier to meet foreigners, as English seemed to stick more to their own. Still I liked to grew up in London, everything seemed rock and roll, even riding a bus or going shopping. It was an inspiration that I found here.

Where did you live in London when you arrived?
Danny:
At first I lived in Hackney, ‘cause there used to be squats in those days, so you didn’t have to pay your rent. You just found am empty place. And that’s actually how many musicians managed in those days, living in squats and stuff. So that’s what I did.

Somehow it´s always thought that people coming from Switzerland are all rich.
Danny: Well, that’s a cliché. Everybody thinks that if you live in Switzerland, you live in a chalet.
Alan: Are you rich?
Danny: Of course I’m rich, I’m from Switzerland! (laughs) The thing is, they really do have a high-living standard, compared to everywhere else, they probably did a bit better than anywhere else. And there’s a lot of rich people too, that’s true. ‘Cause a lot of rich people moved there for tax reasons, or whatever.

Are you still in Hackney?
Danny
: No! Back then Hackney was a bit of a slum, actually.
Alan: Yeah, and it’s a trendy place now, isn’t it?
Danny: Yeah, everything’s changed. Now there are luxurious places everywhere.
Alan: It starts out just as anywhere. The artists move in, ‘cause it’s cheap. The artists make it trendy, and then the developers move in.
Danny: That’s it.

Well that’s how Chelsea was in the ‘60s, and who lives in Chelsea now?
Alan:
Yeah, rich people.

So Rogue male, the Lords of the New Church, then came Kill City Dragons, and then what was next? Was it Vain? If so, then you had to move to America.
Danny: Yes, that’s why I lived in San Francisco for 7 years, and I loved every minute of it.

8So how does a Swiss man that’s based in London starts working for an American band?
Danny:
Well, they played with Steven Adler of Guns N’ Roses at the time, and he still had a lot of drug problems. And in the end I guess he wasn’t reliable enough or something, and they heard that Kill City Dragons split up, and they called me up. I guess I just arrived on time. I had spent nine winters in London and the band just broke apart, and I had worked hard for the last 4 years so, and then when the guys in Vain called me, it was like “yeah, let’s go to California! Fuck this shit, I’m gonna get out of here!” (laughs)

That’s probably why many people from England move to California and never come back.
Danny: Here it’s so wet and cold, it really gets in your bones.
Alan: London is 2 degrees colder than anywhere in England.

And mostly wet.
Danny:
Yeah, it blows from the ocean.
Alan: I must say it’s not how I remember it was when I was younger.
Danny: It used to be worse.
Alan: Yeah, I think so. Before, it had never been warm till the end of October in this country.

9

Kill City Dragons (Danny, far right)

OK Danny, once again, you left the Dragons in 1994 and then moved to California to join Vain. How was to move from London to California? And how long you were in the band?
Danny: Oh absolutely, it was a different planet, a different culture. And I was with them for 4 years, and then Grunge happened and the audiences got smaller and smaller. W started playing stadiums and we ended up playing empty clubs, you know. And then the band members sort of drifted off and there was no work for a long time, unfortunately.

So that meant when Vain was over you had to move again.
Danny:
After 4 years I was kind of illegal there, you know. But then I stayed on for another 3 years and tried to get something together. There are a lot of great musicians in San Francisco but I couldn’t get anything together, nothing solid and after 3 years I decided to go back to Switzerland.

What happens to a musician when suddenly a band’s over and you have nothing coming? You’re kind of stranded…
Danny:
In my case, it was a big impact. First of all you have to get by, unless you have some money coming in from things you already did, the royalties. So you have to take little jobs and give lessons, or work in record stores. Anything that comes along.

And you managed to do it.
Danny: Yeah! Obviously I’m still here! (laughs)

10I needed to ask you that, you know. So then you went back to Switzerland.
Danny: Yes, and it’s hard to get something together if you don’t have any funds or resources. I ran out of funds and things then got a bit deppressive, and I had a big disillusion with the business part of it, you know. I still loved music. I realized in general no one cared about the real things I cared in music, and it really sort of get in my bones. And also the fact that if you’re someone’s drummer you’re supporting a guy with a vision, you know, and if that keeps falling apart and then you start over and over again, and after a while you run out of steam, and that’s what happened to me, so I sort of couldn’t see what I could do. Basically I had to stop playing music for a few years. And then when I had the urge again I bought a guitar and learn a few chords. But I was already writing lyrics since I ever came to England.  I was learning English, and that inspired me to write. So I said to myself, “let’s try something else from a different angle”, you know.

At the time you only played drums, or you were already singing as well?
Danny: Yes, I’d never sung, I just played drums. I tried writing songs and I’d never thought I could come up with anything I later realized it was good. I just thought I didn’t have that talent, and then after that break that lasted for about 3 years, I didn’t touch an instrument for that time, I bought the guitar, learnt a few chords, got my lyric book out and just started to see if I could put things together. Just for myself in the bedroom, you know.

So you didn’t waste your time.
Danny: No, I just got into songwriting, but basically I had to go way back and start over. Because I figured if I was gonna do something again had to be more in control. And if you’re a songwriter, people may leave, but you can keep going until other people arrive, you don’t have to find a new songwriter all the time. It’s not easy to find a really good songwriter, you know. But as time passed by my friends went “oh you sing really good, you have a good voice!” and stuff, and that really gave me confidence to put a new band together. And eventually we recorded an album.

11The Wild at Heart one?
Danny: Yes, that’s how I called it, and we recorded it in Switzerland, as I got back home as it made more sense ecologically, as I was really like burnt out, money-wise, and it was easier to start again there. I wasn’t even sure if I was gonna release it but I wanted to record it, but then many people came to the studio and I ended up calling Dave to play bass on it.

It’s strange because there’s like a scene of musicians that shift between bands. I mean, Dave Tregunna was once in the Dogs D’Amour, then you were in the Dogs for a while too.
Danny: Well, that’s because in a way we share the same musical taste, you know. And then it’s almost natural that you know people that way along that wavelength, then you call them, as you know they can do that kind of music.

So what happened to Wild at Heart?
Danny: So we recorded this album (“Chasing the Dragon”, 2007) with Dave and a really good guitar player who was a friend of mine and whom I’d been in bands before, but I knew they weren’t gonna be a permanent band. Dave lived in England, and this other guy had his own band, so for a while I was trying to get a line-up that could play live. So I did, but I wasn’t really happy with it, so eventually I thought that I should move back to London. I met a girl over there and she became my bass player, and then we ended up in a relationship, so it motivated me to come back here, as she really wanted to go to London. So I came back here in 2010 and found Timo (Kaltio) and Dave, who were not doing anything, just watching TV and not playing music, so I said to them “guys, I wanna start a band, and you’re just sitting around. Come and play with me” And they did. But I had my girlfriend who was already playing bass, and I wanted Dave. And I couldn’t have two bass players, you know. And I didn’t want to kick my girlfriend out of it as she had already played for a few years, and she’s done a good job, she was the best of the lot, so kicking her out would have been unfair. But Dave was playing acoustic guitar at home, as we lived together at the time, and I said to him “why don’t you try rhythm guitar?”, which was a challenge for him. So finally Dave joined the band as guitar player. And they called it Tango Pirates.

All this while you sang. And the first time you didn’t play drums.
Danny: Well, I had already done it a few years, so I had the biggest experience.

12Now that’s a great name for a band! I guess I read the story about the name somewhere, but can you explain it to me anyway?
Danny: Yes, the first blues and Chess guys that came to New York, they didn’t know what to make of themselves, so they called them the Tango Pirates. You can Google it, there’s some hilarious articles in the New York Times from the 1920’s where “they come to the cities to seduce your daughters with sex and drugs, the devil’s music!” and all that stuff, “beware of the tango pirates!” (laughs) And I thought it was amazing that no one actually had used it yet. It’s like part of rock’n’roll history and no one had actually got onto that, you know.

You know, tango is our music down in Argentina.
Danny: Tango was taking over in the 1940’s, they actually were going to jail for dancing the tango, can you imagine? I think that the Church and state were more together in those days, and I think the Church managed to outlaw tango, as it was really frivolous, you know. And then the sexiness of it, as it was too sexual. And you had like 3 months in jail for dancing it, if they caught you. Of course it was originated in South America.

Do you remember this band called Bang Tango? Which I never liked, but anyway those must be the two only rock bands with the word “tango” in their names.
Danny: I really didn’t like them too. However I think the name was catchy, just two easy words to remember.

13But the Tango Pirates are still going, aren’t they?
Danny: Well, actually I’m still working, but anyway there was this first line-up that went on for about 3 years, and then sort of that other members became too busy, so I just wanted to work more and find more people that could concentrate on that one band. Before I knew everyone was in five bands, and in the end I couldn’t get them together anymore, and I got bored waiting for them.

You still haven’t released an album with the Tango Pirates.
Danny: We never did an album, I couldn’t actually finance an album. So we did EPs. By now there are 3 EPs out.

Well, Chuck Berry used to release just singles and EPs for a long time, and compilations, and then he started putting out albums in the ‘70s.
Danny: I know, and the Sisters of Mercy also did EPs for a long time before they put an album. It’s just a financial thing, I have enough songs for three albums right now.

So you finally became a songwriter.
Danny: Yes, and that was something that really perplexed me, ‘cause I never saw or thought I’d have that in me, you know. And that really surprised me. I’m immensely happy because now I didn’t depend on other people so much anymore. I could do my own thing. And also, when you do your own stuff it’s more tailored to exactly who you are and where you wanna go and how you wanna express yourself. Of course now it gets difficult as you have to find people that like your vision.

People who are on the same wavelength.
Danny: It’s a problem, but still easier than finding songwriters. But again, it’s a great experience and it also lets me experience music from a different angle, which is completely different if you’re just a drummer.

Drummers usually don’t write songs.
Danny: Normally they don’t, but it helped my drumming ‘cause now I’m playing more for the songwriter than for the show .

Are you writing on your own, or you also do with somebody else?
Danny: I was writing on my own for a long time, because I didn’t have a songwriting partner, by then people started to co-write with me. I wrote a lot of songs with Dave, and some with my girlfriend. There was another great guitar played in the second line-up, who I was really close to, and in the same wavelength, so there are still some really good songs that haven’t been recorded yet and that are really good.

When was it that you’ve been part of the Dogs D’Amour?
Danny: That was sort of in between. I did a tour with them, but I wasn’t actually a full member. I don’t think they have a steady line-up these days, I think it’s just people that tour.

So that was before the original line-up got together again.
Danny: Yes, that’s how it was. The original band was great!

14

Alan Clayton, Danny, Brian James

Then how did you end playing with the Dirty Strangers?
Alan
: You want me to leave the room? (laughs)
Danny: You know, like Alan said before, we’ve known each other for a long time, and I saw a lot of their gigs, and I guess they needed a drummer and they just called me up.
Alan: Do you know how I got close together with Dave Tregunna? ‘Cause he played in my dad’s band. Dave and Danny were very close friends, and Danny came along to see some shows. And I hadn’t seen Danny for a long period of time.
Danny: And the tango Pirates and the Dirty Strangers, we did some gigs together, so we didn’t lose contact. And a couple of times George couldn’t play, so I filled in.

Is the band planning to a record a new album, now with Danny as a full member? But please this time don’t take another 4 years!
Alan: Yeah, oh no no no…
Danny: Hahaha!
Alan: I know, we’re famous for that. It was good timing, wasn’t it Danny? Danny filled for George a couple of times, and it was great. And Danny got the songs.
Danny: Well, I tried to progress.

15

With ex Lord of the New Church Dave Tregunna (left)

Danny, same question I asked Alan a while ago, what’s your take about the current music scene?
Danny: I do care a little bit. I’d like to be hopeful and see rock going strong but, to be honest, I don’t really see that right now. I see all the old people still doing great, and a lot of nostalgia, and then young kids trying to be something they’re not really, or just trying to be someone else. And I miss personality, string characters like there used to be. And the internet and the social networks have a lot to do with that. Social interaction has changed and that’s reflected on almost everything. But luckily there are still young guys rocking, so hopefully someday it’ll see the light.
Alan: It doesn’t have to be rock’n’roll for a message,if someone’s got something decent to say it can come across in any music.
Danny: I saw on TV kids being asked “what do you wanna be when you grow up?” And they asked “I wanna be famous” But they didn’t sat “I wanna be a singer” or “I wanna be a painter” Just being famous.

Well thanks so much to both of you!
Alan: Are you alright with it?

Sure, it was more than I expected. Come on, it’s gonna be a long one, if you have the time to read it.
Danny: Sweet!
Alan: Yes, and always interesting to see!

16

 

CON DANNY FURY, BATERO ICÓNICO DEL POST PUNK: “PARA MÍ, EL PUNK FUE COMO RESPIRAR POR PRIMERA VEZ”

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 26 de agosto de 2017

Hace unos días les ofrecíamos una entrevista exclusiva con Alan Clayton, miembro central de los Dirty Strangers, que también contaba con la participación de Danny Fury, el nuevo baterista del grupo. Ahora se trata de hacer un giro de 180 grados y entonces presentar una entrevista a Fury, con la participación de Alan, también realizada en Londres en noviembre del año pasado ¿Pero cómo es esto? Tal como se dieron los acontecimientos durante aquella jornada ambas entrevistas se realizaron casi al mismo tiempo, por lo que hubo aportes de cada uno de ellos en los reportajes a sus respectivos compañeros de banda. Pero nunca es tarde para apuntar que, coyunturalmente hablando, el protagonista principal de esta entrevista podría ser considerado tranquilamente el baterista por excelencia del post punk. Y no hay mucho más que agregar al respecto.
1
Con un currículum artístico que lo llevó a pasearse por una buena cantidad de proyectos y, principalmente, la última formación de los recordados Lords of the New Church, Danny ahora reparte su tiempo entre seguir dándole forma a su última aventura personal, los Tango Pirates, mientras sigue ocupando el rol de baterista de los Dirty Strangers, a quienes se sumó el año pasado como miembro estable. Pero mejor que lo explique él mismo.

De alguna manera pensaba que habías nacido en Inglaterra, pero acabo de enterarme que en verdad naciste en Suiza. ¿Cómo es que llegaste a Inglaterra, entonces? ¿Participaste antes de bandas de tu propio país?
Danny: Había tocado en grupos toda mi vida y, si mirás mi colección de discos, vas a ver que muchas de mis bandas favoritas eran inglesas.

Y eso fue en…
Danny: En 1984.

¿Cuáles eran tus principales influencias en aquel momento?
Danny:
Las primeras fueron Hendrix, y cosas como The Sweet. Y todas esas bandas del glam. Alice Cooper…También me gustaban los Stooges y MC5, pero para serte honesto eso vino algo después. Y después llegó el Punk. Para mí, el Punk fue como respirar por primera vez, o algo así, sabés.

2

Danny, allá por fines de los dorados ’80

Puedo recordar algunos artistas suizos, pero la mayoría son de la escena del heavy metal, como Krokus…
Danny:
Bueno, Suiza siempre fue más que nada sobre artistas “técnicos” No hay inspiración que venga de allí. Todo el mundo quería ser otra persona, que es lo mismo que está sucediendo ahora.

¿Cómo fue que elegiste Inglaterra, y no Alemania? Digo, allí también siempre hubo una escena grande…
Danny:
Sí, pero es más o menos lo mismo, solamente intentaban copiar otras cosas. Por un momento estuvo lo del after punk, donde intentaban encontrar su propia cosa. Bandas como Kraftwerk salieron de ahí. Pero después de todo, las bandas alemanas o las suizas trataban de copiar a las británicas.

Diría que, al haber formado parte de muchas bandas del post punk, tranquilamente podrías ser considerado un baterista por antonomasia de esa era. Comenzando con los Lords of the New Church.
Danny: Nunca pensé eso de mí, pero si es que es título encaja, de alguna forma diría, “yeah!” (risas) Pero pienso que también hay otros, no quiero llevarme todos los laureles. Pero sí, hice mucho trabajo, sin dudas. Y soy muy apasionado al hacerlo. Y la gente tal vez haya notado eso.

Al haber estado en todas esas bandas, ¿considerarías que estuviste en el momento y en el lugar justos?
Danny: Bueno, creo que simplemente tuve la suerte de conocer a la gente indicada. Fue lo que fue, y también podría haber sido más.

Sé que eras amigo de los miembros de Hanoi Rocks, y principalmente de Razzle. ¿Es correcto?
Danny: No,en verdad conocí a Razzle antes que muriera. Era muy amigo de Nasty (Suicide), con quien tocamos juntos en algunas bandas. Antes de los Lords él estaba por formar una banda con Stiv Bators y Dave Tregunna, ¿sabías?

No, en absoluto. ¿Eso sucedió en Suiza?
Danny: No, yo ya estaba aquí en Londres. Conocí a Dave cuando se fue de los Lords. En aquel momento él estaba en Cherry Bombz, y también los dejó más tarde. Y cuando leí que se había ido del grupo, justo cuando yo quería hacer algo nuevo, un amigo mío que lo conocía nos presentó. De hecho, después que hicimos algunas sesiones, un día Steve llamó a Dave y decidieron hacer esa banda.

3

Rogue Male en pleno: Danny es el segundo desde la izquierda. Créase o no, este look hacía furor en los 80

¿Cuál fue el primer grupo en Londres con el que tocaste?
Danny:
La primera banda con la que trabajé a niver profesional fue Rogue Male, que era un poco como Motörhead.

Algo más pesado, ¿o se acercaba más al heavy metal?
Danny:
Sí, algo mucho más heavy metal, si bien era más rock que metal. Pero siempre estaban teloneando bandas de mayor nivel, así que yo quería tocar algo de eso. Y fue como ir a la escuela, sabés. Aprendí muchísimo, y entonces después conocí a Dave, y estaba en el camino en que siempre quise estar.

Después de Rough Male, entonces, entraste en los Lords of the New Church. ¿Por cuánto tiempo estuviste en el grupo?
Danny:
Bueno, toque con Dave durante muchos años, pero en cuanto a cuánto estuve en los Lords…Pensé que había sido mucho más, pero ahora, después de una investigación para una película que se hizo sobre Stiv (N. de la R.: “STIV: The Life And Times Of A Dead Boy”, aún sin estrenarse), creo que fueron cerca de 3 años.

4

Momento de relax piscinero a fines de los ’80; en el agua está Stiv Bators, sentadito en el borde está Danny.

¿Entonces cuáles fueron los álbumes de los Lords en los que estuviste?
Danny:
Hicimos un disco en vivo (“Second Coming”) y después un 12 pulgadas en estudio, que es el que tenía el cover de “Making Time”, la canción de The Creation.

Pero sí en cambio giraron mucho…
Danny
: Así es, y eso fue lo principal, en aquellos días casi no parábamos.

Mucho se ha dicho sobre los días salvajes de Stiv Bators, ¿pero cómo eran realmente según la opinión de alguien que los compartió junto á él?
Danny:
Bueno, como podrás imaginarte, era algo salvaje y loco, nunca un momento aburrido, sabés (risas) Definitivamente no hubo ni  un segundo de aburrimiento.

¿Cuán cercano eras a él? ¿Stiv era amigable con vos?
Danny:
Sí, estábamos en eso juntos, porque él era suficientemente loco. A veces Stiv estaba despierto durante días, sabés, y pienso que los demás se cansaron de eso. Para cuando me uní al grupo, ya hacía 4 o 5 años que ellos estaban tocando juntos, o incluso 6. ¡Y yo era el chico nuevo! Pero éramos como hermanos pequeños, sabés.  Creo que su cumpleaños caía 1 día después del mío. Así que fuimos muy unidos desde el vamos. Y es como que él siempre me protegió. Siempre quiso educarme en su estilo de rock and roll.

5Entonces vendría a ser como que Stiv te adoptó…
Danny:
Oh, yo era como su hermano menor, o algo así, y él me educó respecto a un montón de cosas (Alan se ríe fuertemente)

¿Por qué te reís, Alan?
Alan: Porque yo trabajé en lo que fue la útima gira de Stiv. Los Dirty Strangers fuimos soportes de los Lords. Así es como conocí a Danny por primera vez. Siempre habíamos sido amigos de Brian (James) y de Steve. Y después llegó Danny. Me río porque sé cómo fue. Stiv era un tipo muy loco, un loco encantador.

Siempre es bueno tener una opinión sobre él directamente de un compañero de banda.
Danny:
Stiv era alguien muy alentador, y también muy ingenioso. Y tenía todo ese aura a su alrededor. Era alguien especial, sin dudas. Cuando entraba en una habitación, se imponía entre todos sin hacer mucho esfuerzo. Tenía eso que algunas personas tienen. Muy interesante. Es una persona especial en la historia del rock’n’roll.

Y alguien que continúa siendo adorado, a pesar de que ya pasaron muchos años desde que murió.
Danny:
Hace un rato hablabas con Alan sobre Keith (Richards), y creo que ellos eran amigos. Porque en esos días Keith andaba mucho con los punks, en la época en que Stiv estaba en los Dead Boys, y Stiv me contó que a veces cuidaba a Marlon (N. de la R.: Marlon Richards, el hijo de Keith), aparentemente.

Lo que sí sé es que Keith se subió a tocar con los Dead Boys en un club en New York en 1981.
Danny:
¡Sí!

6

Stiv Bators, “alguien muy alentador y también muy ingenioso”, según Danny

Después que se terminaron los Lords of the New Church formaste Kill City Dragons, nuevamente junto a Dave Tregunna. ¿Pensás que eso los elevó a un nivel más profesional del que habían llegado con los Lords?
Danny:
Cuando decís “profesional”, ¿a qué te referís exactamente?

Quise decir, si era algo más personal, y que al mismo tiempo lograbas manejar mejor.
Danny:
No, para nada, de hecho los Lords eran mi banda favorita de aquel momento, por lo que eso era exactamente lo mío, sabés. Llegué a Londres buscando una banda que se asemejara a los Lords, y terminé en los Lords.

¿Entonces cuál fue la razón por la que te fuiste de los Lords? ¿Qué terminó sucediendo?
Danny:
Bueno, Stiv lo canceló, disolvió al grupo. Y nos lo dijo cuando estábamos en el escenario.

¿Se los dijo en vivo, durante un show? No lo sabía. Supongo que nadie se lo veía venir…
Danny: Sí, y ese fue nuestro último show. Apareció hace poco en YouTube. Es muy lindo para ver pero…Es una larga historia. Lo que sucedió fue más o menos que, en aquel momento yo vivía de los shows, y todo el mundo estaba demandando a todo el mundo. No tenía ningún otro ingreso, salvo el de los conciertos. Y entonces cancelaron un tour. Y tienen que existir muy buenos motivos para hacer algo así, sabés, porque montarlo cuesta mucho dinero. Y la banda estaba buscando cantante para esa gira. Y eso enojó mucho a Stiv, sabés.

¿Estaban buscando a un vocalista para reemplazar a Stiv en la gira?
Danny: Sólo para ese tour, en verdad. Nunca pensamos en reemplazar a Stiv. Pero a último momento no se pudo hacer. Si él no podía hacer la gira, eso significaba que íbamos a perder mucho dinero cancelándolo. No tuvo nada que ver conmigo, ni con Brian, ni nada de eso. Stiv había estado de acuerdo con que lo reemplace Dave Vanian (N. de la R.: el cantante de The Damned), pero creo que nadie quería eso. Y Brian puso un aviso en un diario, buscando a otro cantante. Pero probablemente no se lo haya comentado a Stiv, sabés. Y entonces Stiv se enojó muchísimo. De hecho en los bises del concierto Stiv usa una remera con el aviso impreso en ella. Y así fue como terminó todo.

Sin dudas le molestó que alguien ocupara su lugar de frontman después de todos esos años.
Danny: Sí, la comunicación no funcionó, y la gente terminó enojada, sabés.

Eras fan de los Lords, que también tu tipo de música, y terminaste convirtiéndote en miembro del grupo del que siempre soñaste en formar parte.
Danny:
Sí. Me gustaba el concepto general, las cosas que decían. Y sus letras, que era como si me me hablaran a mí, sabés.  La idea completa de lo que se trataba la banda, eso de usar el rock como un tipo de atmósfera para algo. Toda esa información. Y que tenían esa profundidad que parecían hablarme. Era algo mucho más profundo que, digamos, un grupo bailable. Y también algo muy único, y con una gran imagen. Y Stiv era un performer genial. Como Iggy Pop, de alguna manera. Realmente salvaje.

Como el caso de Ronnie Wood, que alguna vez se dijo a sí mismo  “algún día voy a estar en los Rolling Stones”
Danny:
Como el caso de Ronnie Wood, y tal vez algunos pocos más, pero no existe mucha gente en el mundo que podría haber imaginado acabar tocando en su grupo favorito. En realidad, no sabía si estaba sucediendo, o si lo estaba soñando.

Hay sueños que son muy difíciles de cumplir.
Danny:
Es algo muy divertido, realmente, porque yo había sido telonero de los Lords con otra banda antes de ingresar, y en es show hablé con Stiv y le pregunté si conocía alguna banda en Londres en la cual pudiera entrar, y él me dijo, “bueno, si Nicky (N. de la R.: Turner, el baterista original de los Lords of the New Church) se muere, podés tener su puesto” Lo dijo en joda, sabés. Nicky no murió, pero después terminó haciéndose algo real. A Stiv le encantaba esa historia, siempre se la contaba a los periodistas. Stiv estaba muy metido en eso de las estrellas, y cosas así. Y esa historia encaja mucho en todo eso.

Todo cayó en el lugar justo.
Danny:
Sí, y él pensó que era algo que tenía que suceder de esa manera, sabés.

Y seguramente fue ahí cuando dijiste, “ok, me quedo en Londres”
Danny:
Ya estaba aquí, y en aquel momento llegar a Londres era como llegar a casa. Era un lugar donde podías ser vos mismo. Porque es una ciudad tan grande, que podés sentirte más anónimo, realmente podés ser vos mismo. Porque yo crecí en Suiza.

7

Danny en su temprana juventud, suponemos que en Suiza, aunque la alfombra parezca persa

¿En Basilea?
Danny:
Sí. Es una de las ciudades más grandes del país, pero en realidad es como un pueblo pequeño. Y entonces, en Londres, cuando vas caminando por la calle, a nadie le importa, podés ser vos mismo. Pero al principio los ingleses eran algo así como reservados, más apegados a sí mismos. Aún así me gustaba crecer en Londres, todo parecía más rock and roll, ya sea viajar en bus, o salir de compras. Aquí encontré una inspiración.

¿Tenías donde vivir al llegar a la ciudad?
Danny:
  Al principio viví en el barrio de Hackney, porque en aquel momento existían los squats , entonces no tenías que pagar alquiler. Uno encontraba un lugar que estuviera vacío, y listo. Y así fue como muchos músicos se la arreglaban en aquellos días. Así que eso fue lo que hice.

De alguna forma, siempre se pensó que la gente que viene de Suiza es rica.
Danny:
Bueno, es un cliché. Todo el mundo piensa que si vivís en Suiza, vivís en un chalet.
Alan: ¿Sos rico, Danny?
Danny: ¡Por supuesto que soy rico, soy de Suiza! (risas) En verdad lo que sucede es que tienen un estándar de vida alto, en comparación con otros lugares. Probablemente les haya ido mejor que a otros. Y también hay muchísima gente rica, eso es verdad. Porque mucha gente se mudó allí por temas impositivos, o lo que sea.

¿Y ahora seguís viviendo en Hackney?
Danny:
Ya no. En aquel tiempo, Hackney era como un tugurio, realmente.
Alan: Sí, y ahora es un lugar de moda, ¿no?
Danny: Sí, todo cambió. Ahora está lleno de lugares lujosos.
Alan: Es como en todas partes. Los artistas se mudan ahí, porque es barato, pero después hacen que se ponga de moda, y llegan los desarrolladores.
Danny: Es así.

Es lo mismo que ocurrió en Chelsea en los ’60. ¿Y ahora quién puede vivir en Chelsea?
Alan:
Sí, la gente rica.

OK Danny, volvamos a las bandas en las que estuviste. Rogue Male, después vinieron los Lords of the New Church, luego Kill City Dragons…¿Y después que vino? ¿Vain? Ahí fue cuando tuviste que mudarte a los EE. UU.
Danny:
Sí, fue por so que viví en San Francisco durante 7 años. Y amé cada instante estando allí.
8
¿Cómo hace un suizo que vive en Londres para llegar a formar parte de una banda estadounidense?
Danny:
Bueno, por entonces Vain tenía a Steven Adler de Guns N’Roses como baterista. Y Steve todavía tenía muchos problemas con las drogas. Y al final supongo que él ya no les resultaba más alguien creíble, y al mismo tiempo habían escuchado que los Kill City Dragons se habían separado, y me llamaron. Creo que llegué justo a  tiempo.  Había pasado nueve inviernos en Londres y la banda se había disuelto después de trabajar duramente durante 4 años, y cuando me llamaron de Vain fue algo así como “sí, ¡vayamos a California! ¡A la mierda con todo esto, voy a escaparme de aquí!” (risas)

Ese sea tal vez el motivo por el que muchos ingleses que se mudan a California, jamás regresan.
Danny:
Aquí es tan frío y húmedo, que se te mete en los huesos.
Alan: Londres es 2 grados más frío que cualquier otro lugar de Inglaterra.

9

Kill City Dragons: dale duro con el look

Ok Danny, retomemos. Entonces te fuiste de Kill City Dragons en 1994, y luego te mudaste a California para unirte a Vain. Reitero. ¿Cómo fue el cambio de estilo de vida para un suizo que vivía en Londres? ¿Y cuánto tiempo estuviste en la banda?
Danny:
¡Oh, absolutamente! Era como estar en otro planeta, una cultura diferente. Y estuve con ellos durante 4 años, y entonces llegó el grunge, y con eso las audiencias eran cada vez más chicas. Comenzamos tocando en estadios y terminamos tocando en clubes vacíos, sabés. Y luego es como que los miembros de la banda se fueron yendo a la deriva, y casi no hubo trabajo durante un largo tiempo, lamentablemente.

Entiendo que eso significó que tengas que mudarte de lugar nuevamente.
Danny:
Después de estar ahí durante 4 años, ya era como estar ilegal. Pero me quedé 3 años más intentando general alguna otra cosa. Hay muchos grandes músicos en San Francisco, pero no lograba formar nada, nada sólido, y después de esos 3 años decidí retornar a Suiza.

¿Qué es lo que siente un músico cuando su banda se acaba y no tenés ningún proyecto en mente? La sensación debe ser la de estar varado…
Danny:
En mi caso, fue algo de gran impacto. Primero que todo, tenés que arreglártelas para sobrevivir, a menos que obtengas dinero de cosas que ya habías hecho, como los derechos de autor. Entonces tenés que agarrar todo tipo de empleos chicos, o dar clases, o trabajar en disquerías. Lo que sea que aparezca.

10¿Y te las arreglaste para lograr eso?
Danny:
Sí, obviamente. ¡Aún estoy aquí! (risas)

Necesitaba preguntártelo. Y entonces después volviste a Suiza.
Danny:
Sí, y es muy difícil poder organizar algo si no tenés fondos o fuentes para hacerlo. Me había quedado sin dinero, y todo se volvió bastante depresivo, y tuve una gran desilusión con la parte del negocio de la música, sabés. Aún amaba a la música. Me di cuenta que, en general, a nadie le importaban las cosas verdaderas de la música que a mí sí me importaban, y es como que eso caló en mis huesos. Y después también está el hecho de que, si sos el baterista de alguien, estás apoyando a alguien que tiene cierta visión, y si eso sigue yéndose abajo, y después que lo intentaste otra y otra vez, después de un tiempo te quedás sin vapor. Y eso es exactamente lo que me sucedió a mí, no lograba ver lo que podía hacer. Básicamente tuve que parar de tocar música por unos años. Y más tarde, cuando volví a tener la necesidad de hacerlo, me compré una guitarra y aprendí unos pocos acordes. Pero ya venía escribiendo letras de mucho antes, desde cundo había llegado a Inglaterra por primera vez. Al mismo tiempo aprendía a hablar inglés, y eso me inspiró a ponerme a escribirlas. Así que me dije, “probemos con algo que sea desde un ángulo diferente”, sabés.

¿Por aquel entonces solamente tocabas la batería, o también cantabas?
Danny:
Sí. Nunca había cantado, solo tocaba batería. Intenté escribir canciones, y nunca pensé que podía salirme algo, hasta que más tarde me di cuenta que podía hacer buenas cosas. Nunca pensé que tenía ese talento, y entonces, después de esa pausa que duró cerca de 3 años, sin haberme siquiera acercado a un instrumento, me compré la guitarra, aprendí unos acordes, saqué mi libro con las letras de canciones que tenía escritas, y me puse a ver si lograba poner algo en marcha. Tocaba solamente para mí, en mi cuarto.

Bueno, eso significa que no perdiste tu tiempo.
Danny:
No, para nada, me puse a escribir canciones, pero esencialmente tuve que volver al comienzo, y empezar de vuelta. Porque pensé que, si iba a volver a hacer algo, tenía que ser algo que estuviera más bajo mi control. Y si escribís canciones, los otros músicos podrán irse, pero vos podés seguir adelante hasta que aparezcan otros, y de esa forma no tenés que andar encontrando alguien que escriba las canciones todo el tiempo. No es fácil encontrar un buen escritor de canciones, sabés. Pero a medida que pasaba el tiempo, mis amigos me decían, “¡oh cantás realmente bien, tenés una buena voz!”, y cosas así, y eso me dio la confianza necesaria para formar una nueva banda. Y eventualmente, después grabamos un álbum.

11¿El de “Wild at Heart”?
Danny
: Sí, así es como nombré al proyecto, y lo grabamos en Suiza, ya que al volver a casa todo tuvo más sentido a nivel ecológía, ya que yo tenía la cabeza quemada, monetariamente hablando, y fue mucho más fácil volver a empezar estando ahí. Ni siquiera estaba seguro si alguna vez se iba editar, pero yo quería grabarlo. Mucha gente comenzó a acercarse al estudio, y terminé llamando a Dave (Tregunna) para que toque el bajo en el álbum.

Siempre pienso que es como que existió una escena paralela en el rock inglés cuyos músicos pasaron, casi todos, por las bandas de los otros que también al componían. Digo, Dave Tregunna estuvo en los primeros tiempos de los Dogs D’Amour, después junto a vos en los Lords of the New Church, y años más tarde vos mismo pasaste un tiempo por los Dogs.
Danny: Bueno, eso se da porque de alguna manera todos tenemos los mismos gustos musicales, sabés. Y entonces es casi natural que conozcas gente que esté en tu misma onda, y después los llames, porque sabés que pueden hacer ese tipo de música.

Ok, continuemos con Wild at Heart entonces…
Danny:
OK, entonces grabamos el álbum con Dave y con un gran guitarrista que era amigo mío, y con quien también había estado en bandas anteriormente, pero siempre supe que no iba a ser una banda permanente. Dave vivía aquí en Inglaterra, y el otro tipo tenía su propio grupo, así que por un tiempo estuve buscando una banda que pudiera tocar en vivo. Y lo hice, pero no estaba muy feliz con ella, así que eventualmente pensé que debería mudarme de vuelta a Londres. Allí conocí a una chica que luego fue mi bajista, y con quien terminé relacionándome, lo que me motivó a volver aquí, ya que ella realmente quería ir a Londres. Entonces volví  en el 2010 y me encontré con Timo (Kaltio) y con Dave, que no estaban haciendo nada. Se la pasaban mirando TV, no estaban haciendo nada de música, y les dije, “chicos, quiero poner en marcha una banda, y Uds. Se la pasan sentados. Vengan a tocar conmigo” Y lo hicieron. Pero estaba mi novia, que ya tocaba el el bajo en el grupo, y al mismo tiempo yo quería que Dave esté en la banda. Y no podía tener dos bajistas, sabés. Ni tampoco quería echar a mi novia, que hacía rato estaba en la banda,  y que además venía haciendo un muy buen trabajo, era la mejor de todos, por lo que echarla hubiera sido muy injusto.  Pero Dave hacía tiempo que estaba tocando guitarra acústica en casa, ya que por entonces vivíamos juntos, y entonces le dije, “¿por qué no probás tocar guitarra rítmica?”, lo que era todo un desafío para él. Y así fue como finalmente Dave se unió al grupo como guitarrista. Y lo llamamos Tango Pirates.

Y a todo esto, finalmente vos estabas cantando en una banda. Y también era la primera vez en que no tocabas batería.
Danny: Bueno, ya había hecho lo mismo durante unos años, pero igualmente esa fue fue la gran experiencia.
12
Tango Pirates es un gran nombre para un grupo. Creo haber leído al historia en algún lugar, ¿pero me la podrías contar de todas formas?
Danny:
Desde ya. Los primeros músicos de blues de Chicago, al llegar a New York, no sabían muy bien para dónde ir, y entonces alguien comenzó a llamarlos Tango Pirates (“Piratas del Tango”) Podés buscarlo en Google, y aparte también hay algunas notas muy graciosas publicadas en el New York Times en los años ’20, donde dice que “habían llegado a las ciudades para seducir a tus hijas mediante el sexo y las drogas, ¡la música del diablo!”, y todo este tipo de cosas. “¡Cuidado con los tango pirates!” (risas) Y pensé que era increíble que nadie haya usado ese nombre hasta aquel momento. Es algo que es parte de la historia del rock and roll y nadie lo utilizó, sabés.

Supongo que estarás al tanto de que es uno de los estilos musicales por excelencia de mi país, Argentina.
Danny:
El tango era algo muy bandido en los años ’40, de hecho iban a la cárcel por bailarlo, ¿podés creerlo? Pienso que la Iglesia y el Estado estaban muy relacionados en aquellos tiempos, y supongo que la Iglesia se las ingenió para marginar al tango, ya que era algo que resultaba realmente frívolo, sabés.  Y después está todo eso de la sexualidad del tango, porque era algo muy sexual. Y si lo bailabas, te llevaban preso por 3 meses, si es que te agarraban. Desde ya, se originó en Sudamérica.

Ya que estamos, ¿recordás al grupo Bang Tango? Nunca me gustaron, pero como fuera, deben ser las dos únicas bandas del rock de la historia con la palabra “tango” en sus nombres.
Danny:
Tampoco me gustaban, para nada. Igualmente pienso que el nombre es muy pegadizo, se trata de recordar sólo dos palabras.

13Pero fuera de tu trabajo con los Dirty Strangers, los Tango Pirates siguen activos, ¿verdad?
Danny:
Bueno, en verdad sigo trabajando con ellos, pero de todas maneras, hubo una primera formación que duró por alrededor de 3 años, y después es como que los miembros del grupo estaban muy ocupados…Y yo quería trabajar más, y con gente que pudiera concentrarse en la banda. Antes que me diera cuenta, cada uno de ellos estaba en al menos cinco bandas, y al final no pude volver a juntarlos, y me aburrí de esperarlos.

Los Tango Pirates no editaron ningún álbum hasta el momento.
Danny:
Nunca hicimos un álbum, realmente nunca pude financiarlo. Así que hicimos EPs. Hasta el momento se editaron tres.

Bueno, Chuck Berry se la pasó editando singles y EPs durante muchos años. Salvo las recopilaciones, recién comenzó a lanzar LPs en los años 70.
Danny:
Lo sé. Y los Sisters of Mercy también hicieron sólo EPs durante un largo tiempo, antes de lanzar un disco. Es algo financiero, de hecho tengo canciones como para tres álbumes.

Y fuera de todo eso, finalmente te convertiste en compositor de canciones.
Danny:
Sí, y eso es algo que realmente me dejó perplejo, porque nunca pensé, o vi, que podía tener eso en mí, sabés. Y me sorprendió muchísimo. Ahora soy inmensamente feliz, ya que no necesito tanto de depender de otra gente. Puedo hacer lo mío. Y aparte, cuando hacés tu propio material, es algo que se ajusta más a quién sos realmente, hacia dónde querés ir, y cómo querés expresarte. Por supuesto, por otro lado se hace difícil encontrar gente que comparta tu manera de ver las cosas.

Gente que esté en tu misma frecuencia.
Danny:
Es todo un problema, pero aún así, resulta más fácil que el de encontrar gente que escriba canciones. Pero reitero, es una gran experiencia , y también me permite experimentar la música desde un ángulo diferente, lo cual, si sos un baterista, es algo totalmente distinto.

Los bateristas no son de escribir canciones…
Danny:
Normalmente no lo hacen, pero ayudó mucho a mi forma de tocar batería, porque ahora me centro más en eso, que en el show en sí.

¿Estás componiendo canciones exclusivamente por las tuyas, o también con alguien más?
Danny:
Escribí solo durante mucho tiempo, porque no tenía un colega para hacerlo, pero después algunos empezaron a co-escribir conmigo. Escribí muchas canciones con Dave, y algunas con mi chica. Hubo otro gran guitarrista en la segunda formación del grupo de quien estaba muy cerca, y en la misma onda, por lo que hay muchas grandes canciones que aún no fueron grabadas, y que son muy buenas.

Sé que, si bien fue de forma muy breve, alguna vez pasaste por los Dogs D’Amour…
Danny:
Eso fue algo, digamos, intermedio. Hice una gira con ellos, pero nunca fui integrante estable. Creo que hoy día no tienen formación fija, son sólo cuatro personas que salen de gira.

Entonces eso sucedió antes que la formación original vuelva a juntarse, que igual terminó siendo algo muy efímero.
Danny:
Exactamente, fue así. ¡La banda original era grandiosa!

14

Alan Clayton, Danny y Brian James: la actualidad les sienta bien

Ok, yendo al presente, ¿cómo fue que terminaste tocando en los Dirty Strangers?
Alan:
¿Querés que salga de la habitación? (risas)
Danny:
Sabés, como dijo Alan, nos conocíamos desde hacía mucho tiempo. Vi muchísimos de sus shows. Y supongo que estaban precisando un baterista, y entonces me llamaron.
Alan: ¿Querés saber cómo me hice amigo de Dave Tregunna? Eso se dio porque Dave tocó en la banda de mi padre. Dave y Danny eran íntimos amigos, y entonces Danny era de venir a ver mis shows. Y de hecho hacía mucho que no lo veía…
Danny: Los Tango Pirates y los Dirty Strangers hicieron juntos algunos conciertos, así que nunca perdimos contacto. Y también hubo un par de ocasiones en las que el baterista anterior, George, no pudo tocar con ellos, y yo lo reemplacé.

¿Planean granar un nuevo disco con Danny como miembro fijo? Eso sí, por favor que esta vez no les vuelva a llevar 4 años hacerlo…
Alan:
(Risas) Sí, oh no no no…
Danny: ¡Jajaja!
Alan: Lo sé, somos famosos por eso. Fue un buen timing, ¿no Danny? Danny reemplazó a George en un par de shows, y fue genial. Y Danny también captó todas nuestras canciones.
Danny: Bueno, intentaba progresar…

15

Dave Tregunna y Danny: la combinazione vincente

Te formulo la misma pregunta que le hice a Alan en su entrevista, y en la que también participaste. ¿Cuál es tu opinión sobre la actualidad de la escena musical?
Danny:
Algo me importa. Me gustaría ser esperanzado y ver que el rock vuelve a hacerse algo fuerte pero, honestamente, no veo que eso esté ocurriendo ahora. Veo que los músicos de antes aún lo hacen bien, y que hay mucha nostalgia, y después chicos jóvenes intentando ser algo que en realidad no son, o tratando de ser otras personas. Y extraño eso de la personalidad, personajes fuertes, como solía haber. Y tanto la internet como las redes sociales tienen mucho que ver con eso. La interacción social ha cambiado, y eso se refleja en casi todo. Pero con suerte todavía hay chicos jóvenes rockeando, así que espero que algún día eso vea la luz.
Alan: No tiene que ser necesariamente rock´n´roll para que tenga un mensaje, si alguien tiene algo decente para decir lo puede hacer con cualquier tipo de música.
Danny: Veo en TV a chicos  que les preguntan, “¿qué querés ser cuando seas grande?” Y ellos contestan, “quiero ser famoso” Pero no dicen “quiero ser cantante”, o “quiero ser pintor de cuadros” Sólo quieren ser famosos.

Bueno, ahora sí, ¡muchas gracias a ambos!
Alan:
¿Todo bien con la entrevista?

Desde ya, ¡fue más de lo que esperaba! Y aparte fueron suficientemente extensas, como para que no quede nada afuera.
Danny:
¡Genial!
Alan: Sí, ¡y es algo que siempre va a resultar interesante leer!

16

ROBERT JOHNSON, EL GUITARRISTA CON UN TALENTO DE LOS MIL DIABLOS… O QUIZÁ DE UNO SOLO

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 16 de agosto de 2017

“FUI HASTA LA ENCRUCIJADA Y CAÍ DE RODILLAS, LE PEDÍ PIEDAD AL SEÑOR, POR FAVOR, SALVA AL POBRE BOB” (“CROSS ROAD BLUES”, 1936)

La mitología cristiana se ha ocupado largamente de esta leyenda. Pudimos contemplarla a través de los relatos más disparatados, en libros, cuentos y películas. La historia del hombre que pacta con el diablo es uno de los relatos más recurrentes que han aparecido a lo largo de las efemérides y, casualidad o no, muy asiduamente ha estado relacionada con la música. Dos siglos atrás, la gente solía creer que el violinista italiano Nicolo Paganini tenía poderes demoníacos. Y ni hablar de los cientos de leyendas urbanas. Pero ningún relato faustiano ha perdurado tanto en el imaginario popular como el del músico de blues Robert Johnson. Según reza la leyenda, un principiante Johnson tomó su guitarra y se dirigió a la intersección de las carreteras 49 y 61 de la ciudad de Clarksdale, estado de Mississippi, donde el diablo le devolvió su instrumento a cambio de su alma… Tras haberlo dado por muerto por quienes lo conocían, Johnson, que hasta aquel momento había pasado por la escena musical sin pena ni gloria, reapareció al tiempo demostrando una técnica y maestría formidables a la hora de ejecutar el blues… a 79 años del día de su fallecimiento (curiosamente, el mismo día de la muerte de Elvis Presley), recordamos a esta figura y al supuestamente tenebroso origen de su incomparable talento.

2

La encrucijada del diablo tiene su monumento guitarrístico

Así, los rumores sobre la historia del bluesman que logró conjurar riffs pentatónicos y sonidos de guitarra slide, acompañados por un ronco tono vocal soberbio, se extendieron por todo el estado sureño. Aquellos que lo habían escuchado tocar antes del insigne episodio también sabían lo que se rumoreaba sobre el hombre que había hecho un pacto con Satán para terminar dominando el género en el cual ahora descollaba con una excelencia sublime, creando su leyenda individual y asimismo liberándolo de su propio infierno, los de los sofocantes campos de algodón del crudo sur estadounidense donde se ganaba el pan de cada día. Sin embargo, los historiadores no la han pasado nada bien a la hora de rastrear los auténticos detalles sobre su vida. Supuestamente, Robert Leroy Johnson había nacido en Hazlehurst, estado de Mississippi, un 8 de mayo de 1911, producto de un affaire extramarital entre su madre (que previamente había sido abandonada por su esposo) y un campesino local. A los dieciséis años, Johnson ya se encontraba trabajando en los campos de algodón y, para evitar terminar siendo asociado con acusaciones infundadas -era muy común que un negro pobre termine siendo utilizado como chivo expiatorio- se paseaba por la vida tras haber adoptado una serie de alias, como el de Robert Spenser o el de Robert Sax. Los historiadores indican que Johnson se casó al menos en dos oportunidades, y fue durante su segundo matrimonio, en 1931, que comenzó con el blues. Originalmente tocaba armónica, para luego pasarse a la guitarra, el instrumento que terminó convirtiéndolo no sólo en un auténtico innovador del género en cuestión, sino también en el padre original del rock and roll moderno.

3

Johnson, en algún momento de gloria de su fugaz carrera

GUITARRAS, CAMINOS Y HUESOS DE GATO NEGRO. Hasta entonces Johnson era un simple aprendiz con delirios de estrella, por lo que los músicos de blues más experimentados de aquellos años como Charlie Patton, Willie Brown o Son House, terminaban aceptando de mala gana que se suba al escenario para tocar junto a ellos. Todo esto hasta que llegó el día en que el novato Johnson desapareció por seis meses; en este lapso, solamente munido de su guitarra y un hueso de gato negro, esperó en la histórica intersección de caminos (sitio que tradicionalmente era utilizado para darle sepultura a todos aquellos que no eran considerados dignos de ser enterrados en un cementerio), para acabar vendiéndole su alma al diablo. Al retornar, su indiscutible talento para tocar la guitarra terminó impresionando a los bluesmen más expertos, lo que significó el verdadero comienzo de la leyenda. ¿De qué otra manera Johnson pudo haber logrado semejante maestría al ejecutar su instrumento? Según el folklore africano, una deidad conocida con el nombre de Esú, el guardián histórico de las encrucijadas, era la figura encargada de obrar de intermediaria entre los dioses y el hombre. Habiendo sido los misioneros cristianos quienes impartieron las enseñanzas de la cristiandad a las tribus africanas, muchos de los dioses paganos terminaron siendo asociados con el concepto del diablo, por lo que una encrucijada representaba el punto geográfico por excelencia en el cual un hombre podía encontrarse con Satán. Lo que explica por qué la brujería, o cualquier tópico relativo a un probable acercamiento al maligno, se hayan mantenido prominentes en muchas de las letras de blues a través de los tiempos.

4EL DIABLO SABE POR DIABLO… PERO MÁS SABE POR BLUESMAN. Curiosamente, el relato original del pacto de Johnson se vio modificado según la “visión” que tuvo el músico de blues Henry Goodman, que no trastabilló a la hora de sugerir su propia versión de lo ocurrido aquella fría noche: “Robert Johnson había estado tocando en Yazoo City y en Beulah, intentando retornar a Helena, y en plena carretera se topó con un camino vecino a un dique. Llevaba la guitarra sobre su hombro. Era una noche fresca de octubre, y la luna llena iluminaba el cielo oscuro. Johnson no lograba dejar de recordar a Son House cuando éste le decía ‘Bajá la guitarra, muchacho, estás enloqueciendo a la gente’. Como siempre, Johnson estaba buscando mujeres y whisky. Había árboles muy altos por todo el lugar, el camino era oscuro y solitario. Un perro loco y envenenado aullaba y gemía desde una zanja al costado. Johnson sentía escalofríos por todo el cuerpo, mientras se iba acercando a una encrucijada al sur de Rosedale. Robert Johnson, sintiéndose mal y solo, conocía a gente que vivía en Gunnison. Allí podía conseguir whisky, y mucho más. Un hombre que estaba sentado sobre un tronco al costado de la carretera va y le dice ‘Llegaste tarde, Robert Johnson’. Johnson cae sobre sus rodillas y le contesta ‘Tal vez no’. El hombre, muy alto, con el pecho del tamaño de un barril y negro como los ojos cerrados de Johnson, se pone de pie y se acerca al medio del cruce de caminos en el que Johnson se arrodillaba, y le dice ‘De pie, Robert Johnson. ¿Querés tirar esa guitarra en la zanja con ese perro sin pelo y volver a Robinsonville y tocar la armónica con Willie Brown y Son y seguir siendo uno más del montón, o querés tocarla como nunca nadie lo hizo? ¿Con un sonido que nadie jamás escuchó? ¿Querés ser el rey del blues del Delta y tener todo el whisky y las mujeres que quieras?’ ‘Eso es mucho whisky y mujeres, Hombre-Diablo’, le contestó Johnson. ‘Te conozco, Robert Johnson’, le replicó el hombre. Johnson sintió que la luz de la luna caía sobre su cabeza y la parte trasera de su cuello, mientras la luna parecía crecer más y más, cada vez más brillante. La sentía como si fuera el calor del mediodía, y el aullido y gemido del perro en la zanja le penetraban el alma, subiéndole por sus pies y las puntas de los dedos a lo largo de sus piernas y brazos, hasta terminar en ese espacio vacío detrás del esternón, haciendo que se sacuda y se estremezca, como si fuera paralítico.

5

El cruce de las rutas 49 y 161 hoy, donde Johnson acordó su supuesto pacto con el diablo. Ahí, donde está el árbol y el monumento con guitarras.

Robert Johnson dice ‘Ese perro se volvió loco’. El hombre se ríe. ‘Ese sabueso es mío. No está loco, tiene el Blues. Tengo su alma en mi mano’. El perro esboza un gemido bajo y sentimental, un aullido jamás escuchado, rítmico, y gruñidos, chillidos y ladridos sincopados, convulsionando a Johnson, y haciendo que las cuerdas de su guitarra vibren y zumben un sonido triste y oscuro, acordes y notas, poseyendo a Robert Johnson, dominándolo, haciendo que se pierda dentro de sí mismo, dando vueltas, levantándolo por los aires. Robert Johnson enfoca su mirada hacia la zanja y ve que los ojos del perro reflejan la luz de la luna brillante, fulgurantes, con un brillo violeta penetrante, y Robert Johnson sabe lo que está pasando, y siente que está mirando los ojos de un Perro del Infierno, y le tiembla todo el cuerpo. El hombre dice ‘El perro no está en venta, Robert Johnson, pero el sonido puede ser tuyo. Es el sonido del Blues del Delta’ ‘Tengo que tener ese sonido, Hombre-Diablo. Ese sonido es para mí. ¿Dónde tengo que firmar?’ El hombre le contesta, ‘No tenés ningún lápiz, Robert Johnson. Tu palabra es suficiente. Todo lo que tenés que hacer es seguir caminando en dirección al norte. ¡Pero mejor preparate! Hay consecuencias’¿Preparado para qué, Hombre-Diablo?’ ‘¿Sabés dónde estás, Robert Johnson? Estás parado en el medio de una encrucijada de caminos. A la medianoche, esa luna llena caerá directamente sobre tu cabeza. Un paso más, y estarás en Rosedale. Si vas por este camino hacia el este, volverás a la carretera 61 en Cleveland, o podés retornar y volver a Beulah, o dirigirte hacia el oeste, sentarte en el dique y mirar el río. Pero si seguís en la dirección que habías tomado, vas a llegar a Rosedale a la medianoche, bajo la luna llena de octubre, y vas a tener el Blues como nadie lo tuvo en este mundo. Mi mano izquierda envolverá tu alma por siempre, y tu música poseerá a todos los que la escuchen. Eso es lo que va a suceder. Eso es para lo que tenés que estar preparado. Tu alma me pertenecerá. Esta no es una encrucijada cualquiera. No por nada la marqué con una equis, y te estuve esperando’… Robert Johnson movió su cabeza, con la cuenca de sus ojos mirando hacia la luz cegadora de la luna, que para entonces ya había llenado la oscurísima noche del Delta, perforando su ojo derecho como si fuera una descarga de relámpagos al filo de la medianoche. Miró al inmenso hombre directamente a los ojos y le dijo, ‘¡Atrás, Hombre-Diablo, estoy yendo a Rosedale. ¡Soy el Blues!’ El hombre se hizo a un lado y le dijo, ‘Seguí adelante, Robert Johnson. Sos el Rey del Blues del Delta. Volvé a tu hogar en Rosedale. Y cuando llegues a la ciudad, buscá un plato de tamales calientes, vas a necesitar tener algo en tu estómago’

EL SECRETO DE MI ÉXITO. Eventualmente, gracias a su nuevo nivel de excelencia musical, Johnson logró cumplir cada uno de sus sueños, más precisamente los de sumergirse de lleno en el mundo del whisky, las apuestas, y las mujeres fáciles. Una vez que logró notoriedad como guitarrista de primera línea, viajó por todo el sur de los Estados Unidos, desbordando de público todos y cada uno de los lugares en los que se presentaba. Su inusual apariencia, mientras tanto, basada en la suposición que indicaba que tenía un “ojo malo” (en verdad, una catarata que se había formado sobre el cristalino), logró que se le agregue más combustible a su de por sí muy incendiaria apariencia, por lo que el público creía que una mirada de Johnson era todo lo necesario para mandar a uno al infierno.robertjohnson-album Johnson también acostumbraba a tocar de espaldas a la audiencia, lo que era interpretado como señal de que siempre tenía algo que ocultar. Pero en verdad lo que Johnson buscaba reservarse eran los yeites que le permitían tocar la guitarra tan magistralmente, y que no quería que nadie le robe.

6Así, el Rey del Blues del Delta grabó sólo 29 canciones, las cuales llegaron a sumar un total de 41 pistas (incluyendo las tomas alternativas), todas ellas registradas entre 1936 y 1937 -editadas por entonces en once discos de pasta individuales de 78 revoluciones- tarea por la que cobró la por entonces no tan moderada suma de cien dólares, plasmando así un legado único que más tarde lo consagraría como uno de las principales influencias de los artistas de blues y rock más reputados (sus canciones fueron versionadas por discípulos de la talla de Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, Elmore James o Cream, entre otros) y que no verían la luz en conjunto hasta 1991, cuando la compañía Columbia editó “The Complete Recordings”, un álbum doble conteniendo todo lo que Johnson alguna vez registró, y que le valió la certificación de Mejor Álbum Histórico.

ANTES QUE EL DIABLO SEPA QUE ESTÁS MUERTO. Las circunstancias que rodearon a su muerte sólo lograron reforzar la leyenda y, lejos de la versión que indicaba, obviamente, que el diablo se había llevado su alma, los biógrafos coincidieron en señalar que fue apuñalado o, como se creyó más popularmente, que recibió un tiro certero de manos de una novia celosa, o bien del esposo de una de su tantas amantes. O tal vez envenenado con estricnina.

7

Uno de los tantos lugares en el sur de EE.UU. donde -se dice, se cree, se supone- puede estar enterrado el cuerpo de Robert Johnson.

Otras interpretaciones de los hechos citan la posibilidad de haber sufrido una sífilis alocada que lo tuvo angustiado durante tres años, hasta que terminó cayendo de rodillas y, aullando y ladrando como un perro agonizante, exhaló por última vez el 16 de agosto de 1938, a los 27 años de edad… Su tumba más recordada -en rigor una de las tres existentes, lo que acabó aportando aún más pimienta a la leyenda- puede ser visitada en el cementerio de la iglesia Misionaria Bautista Mount Zion, situada cerca de la carretera 7 de Morgan City, en su Mississippi natal, y no tan lejos del lugar donde, mito o verdad, y con tan sólo ellos dos como únicos testigos, Robert Johnson negoció con el mismísimo diablo.

 

 

WITH ALAN CLAYTON OF THE DIRTY STRANGERS: “I WRITE BETTER WITH MY BACK AGAINST THE WALL”

Estándar

Original article (in Spanish) published in Revista Madhouse on August 13, 2017

And on the eight day God created The Dirty Strangers. Or something. Because the story of one of the most particular London cult bands of the last three-odd decades actually had to do with earthlier facts. No eighth day of creation, then. God has never taken up the work again, he just had to settle for seven days to do what he could do. Instead came Alan Clayton, singer, guitarist and, most of it all, main man behind the songs of the Shepherd´s Bush band, one of the most cosmopolitan areas of the British capital city.

1..

The Dirty Strangers in the ’80s: Ray King, Dirty Alan Clayton, Mark Harrison, Scotty Mulvey, Paul Fox

Like in a theater programme, to get to know about the days and the times of the Dirtys suggests a brief description of the cast. The first name on the list is irrevocably (again) Clayton, the band´s heart and soul, or as clearly described in the group´s website: “The band were on a mission: carrying a torch for rootsy rock’n’roll as invented by Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent and Chuck Berry but laced with a little bit of Otis Redding soul and a side order of punk attitude” Oh yes. The original cast that spawned the early days of the Dirty Strangers’ biography continues with Jim Callaghan, most remembered as the Rolling Stones’ touring security chief  for at least 30 years, currently retired, who Clayton used to work for when he still hadn´t picked up the music path. Next is former boxer Joe Seabrook, Alan´s close friend, who also did Security for Callaghan before becoming Keith Richards’ (yes, that Keith Richards) personal bodyguard, till he passed away in 2000. There´s also Stash Klossowski De Rola (better known as Prince Stash), an aristocratic dandy all the way from the London ‘60s bohemian scene, one of Brian Jones’ closest mates, whom he was busted with on a historic drug raid in 1967. Last but not least is the very Keith Richards himself (yes, that Keith once again) as prime eventual catalyst, who thanks to all the aforementioned characters ended up being not only the band´s unofficial godfather, but also a very close friend of, of course, Alan Clayton’s. One thing lead to another and, 30 years and four albums later (“The Dirty Strangers”, “West 12 To Wittering (Another West Side Story)”, “Crime And A Woman”, and “Diamonds”, a compilation), the nowadays four-member group (Clayton on vocals and guitar, Scott Mulvey on piano, Cliff Wright on bass and drummer Danny Fury) prepare to record a new album early next year. As they’ve been doing since their early days, in the meantime they´ll keep doing the odd club circuit in England, with 3 gigs in Spain by late September (in Barcelona, Zaragoza and Reus) recently added.

2..

A promo poster of the Dirtys’ self-titled first album, with Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood as guests

NO SLEEP TILL HAMMERSMITH
REVISTA MADHOUSE visited Clayton´s place last November to interview him and go over the band´s history. In order to get to Dirty Alan´s headquarters (which backyard includes an intimate and tiny personal recording studio) one needs to reach the Hammersmith and Fulham Borough, in West London, not far from the legendary Wormwood Scrubs prison, which involved a truly funny question after asking a local lady about the right directions in order to get there by mentioning the traditional jail (“Oh, your friend lives there?”) Along with Alan was bandmate Danny Fury (once drummer of the Lords of the New Church, among other great bands he was in), whom we´ll soon feature an exclusive interview with too. So here´s a smooth (and sometimes also wild) ride about the lives and times of the Dirty Strangers in the very own words of its creator, a rock’n’roll task that took him longer than, rather more than, seven days.

3..

Clayton, Wright and Mulvey, on a recent show

The Dirtys were born in the mid-80’s but what before that, I mean, personally, as a musician?Alan: The band formed in ’78. I mean, I started playing guitar I suppose in ’76, something about that I used to write songs and poetry. Because most of the people think that when I met Keith, that’s where the band started. And the reason why I met Keith is because we were very successful. The Lords of the New Church were a big band, and the Dirtys had their own scene playing the Marquee. Your career moves very fast when you´re young.  And about three years before I met Keith, I met him in ’81, we had already headlined the Marquee.

So what´s the story behind you getting to meet Keith? How did that really happen?
Alan: I was the Jack of all trades, and one of my jobs was, like, Security. Joe Seabrook was one of my best mates, I knew Joe before he met Keith. My first day with Keith was in Big Joe´s pub.

4..

The Verulam Arms, Joe Seabrook´s former pub in Warford

Joe had a pub?
Alan: Yeah, in Watford, called The Verulam Arms.

Watford? That’s Elton John’s hometown, isn’t it? That’s close to where I’m staying now, in Hemel Hempstead.
Alan: Right, very close. In fact Joe had a place in Hemel Hempstead as well.

So Joe was doing Security at the time.
Alan: Yeah, he had a pub, and he was doing Security, and we became good friends. He was the Stranglers’ bodyguard, Big Country’s bodyguard…

Then how did you meet Jim Callaghan?
Alan: Jim and Paddy was the one I worked for, it was a firm called Call A Hand.  So I worked for Paddy and Jim, and Joe came to work for Paddy and Jim as well. Because of Joe’s immense stature and presence, he became a bodyguard as well.

5..

Keith Richards and Alan in the early ’80s: friendship and guitars

He was a boxer, wasn’t he?Alan: Yeah, he was.

So you were doing Security on your own.
Alan: Yeah, working for Jimmy, for Jimmy Callaghan.

And then I guess you met Keith through Joe…
Alan: Yeah. And because I had this musical connection with Joe, when Joe started working for Keith, he wanted Keith to hear our music, ‘cause he knew Keith would like it. Carlton Towers in Knightsbridge. He took me out to meet Keith. And it was funny because he brought me into his bedroom. I arrived at the hotel 11 in the evening, so I was working during the day.  And I said “when are we going to see him?”, and Joe said, “he doesn’t get up until 2 in the morning”. Fuck it! I’d been at work all day!

How did you feel about that at the time? Were you somehow excited? I guess you’ve always liked Keith as a guitar player…
Alan: Of course I was excited! I had other people I preferred but I liked the stuff he likes, Otis Redding, Motown…The Stones were always a band I liked, but I liked The Who more, as they were always more of a London band for me. So that’s how I met him. I remember I went into his bedroom in the Carlton Towers, and Joe said “this is Alan, he plays in a band that sounds like the Stones used to sound” And Keith said “look forward to that, it’s been a while” And two days later he’d say to me “I’m off to Paris now”, and I said “oh I’d never been to Paris”, so he sent his chauffeur around asked me to take a guitar and swordstick and said “come and stay with me in Paris”. And I’d only known him for 2 days, you know.

Just like that.
Alan: His chauffeur turned up in Keith’s Bentley. Picked me up and drove to Paris. His dad Bert was still living in Dartford, where Keith came from, so on our way to Dover, he picks up Bert. So that’s me and Bert in the Bentley, we went to Paris.

6..

Keith and Alan in recent times: friendship and sofas

The three of you.
Alan: Well, Keith was flying there. Just me, Bert and the chauffeur.

That must have been a great ride!
Alan: Oh it was good!

Great story, and great way to start as well!
Alan: But I’d already been in the studio with Ronnie (Wood). We’d done “Baby” and “Here She Comes”, and “Easy To Please”.

And that’s on your first album.
Alan: Yeah, right. And then “Thrill Of A Thrill” So I’d already been recording with Ronnie, and Keith helped set up shows in Paris. We still never had a record deal, and it was only a couple of years later when Mick (Jagger) was doing his solo album, and all sort of fell into place.

And all because of Joe, right?
Alan: Yeah yeah. Joe was a major part of my career, because the first live shows we’ve ever done was in his pub. But before that I was working for Jimmy Callaghan doing Security. I worked at the Stones’ concerts Earl’s Court in ’76. I had lots of strange jobs from Jimmy. I used to clear out brothels. That’s a house with prostitutes.

Where was that?
Alan: In Soho. And then I used to work for Jimmy, and clear out those brothels.

Yes, Jim used to be very nice with me in the USA in ’94 while I followed the tour, very helpful.
Alan: He’s a lovely man. It was through Joe that I met Keith, but Jimmy was my first friend.

7..

The Ruts. Paul Fox is holding a beer can.

STRANGERS IN AMERICA
Alan, I want to ask you about Paul Fox, who was formerly with the Ruts, but he was an early member of the Dirty Strangers, in the first line-up, wasn´t he?
Alan: Not in the first line-up of the band, but in the first one who went to America. And he also played on the first album, but it was Alistair Simmons, who also played in the Lords of the New Church. He wrote “Baby”, “Running Slow”…There are still songs I’m doing that I wrote with him. And when Alistair left the Dirty Strangers, he joined the Lords of the New Church. Lovely and fantastic bloke, but couldn’t keep it together all the time, you know. As for Paul Fox, it was funny, because when Malcolm Owen, the singer…You know about The Ruts, don’t you?

A little bit…
Alan: The Ruts were gonna tour with The Who, but Malcolm was a junkie, and he fuckin’ had to cancel a tour with The Who. It was a real unfortunate ending for him. When I used to work doing Security, I’d seen The Ruts and I thought “I could be a singer in this band” They came from West London as well, so there was a bit of a connection there. And 3 or 4 years later I’m in the back of this cinema in Kensal Rise in London, trying to get a gig in this old cinema, it’s not there anymore. And Paul Fox was there and he said “you really remind me of my old singer” And I said “you know what, when your singer died, I was gonna fuckin’ apply for the job” And then he said “I wish you had”, ‘cause after Malcolm died, The Ruts went in a complete different direction. And I got to know him. He had got on stage with us for a couple of gigs. He was a new friend I had found I really liked. And two weeks before we were gonna tour America Alistair fucked up. We had just got a manager and this tour would cost him a lot of money. And Alistair was always on that edge of being brilliant or fuckin’ terrible. The last gig for the Hells Angels, you know.  He was so out of it he couldn’t play his guitar. And my manager said “I’m not paying the money to take him to America” All the temptations he would be offered over there…

Huty21393 021

Oh yeah: More Dirtys, early days

So he wasn’t part of it.
Alan: No. it was a big decision. He was my best friend. We sacked him two weeks before they toured America. It was one of our goals. So I rang Paul Fox up and asked him to do the tour. And then he joined the band.

How was that American tour?
Alan: We only toured the East Coast. It wasn’t actually a tour, it lasted for seven days or something.

All small venues?
Alan: Well, we played the Cat Club in New York, which is a big one. And places around New York, you know. Boston, etc.

So that was the first time the Dirtys played there.
Alan: Yeah. We didn’t have a record deal then either.

And that was before you met Ronnie.
Alan: No, I’d met Ronnie! A couple of years before.

Ok you had already recorded the songs, but you didn’t have a record deal yet.
Alan: Yeah. We recorded with Ronnie, and then we recorded with Keith. Mick had bought his solo album out. That’s how Keith had the time.

9..

And then one day the Dirtys met Ronnie Wood…

The album was produced by Prince Stash, but how did he get into the scene?
Alan: You know, Stash got busted with Brian Jones. When Keith came to the studio to record with us, Stash was with him. If you see that photograph…There´s a photo with all of us in the studio with Keith and Stash. And afterwards Stash said “who is bringing the record out?” So he formed Thrill Records after “Thrill of a Thrill”, the first song on the album. So he formed the label and dedicated a year of his life. I mean, it got released worldwide, and it done well. It all seemed so easy at the time, but now you say “fuck I would love to have that now”, you know. And he put money into it, he was great. I have some great stories about him. Do you remember Pinnacle, the distribution company for independent record companies. When you went down there you had 20 minutes to state your case, 45 minutes later Stash is still telling them what a fantastic album it was…

So everything just clicked.
Alan: It did, but when we were in America it all started to go wrong. What happened was that in Britain we sold a lot of albums, and when Stash took it to America they used Keith’s name as an advertisement. Keith played with us before he did his first solo album. And when he started his first solo album, which was a big deal at the time, it was in his contract that he wasn’t on any other albums, and Jane Rose (Keith´s manager) always said “when Keith records with friends, it’s best to let the people find out about Keith playing on it otherwise it could go wrong”. So in America Stash added a sticker on the cover of the album saying “The Dirty Strangers featuring Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood” And Keith was just about to release his solo album exclusive, and so our album got banned in America. And I understand why it wasn’t smart how they advertised it in America. So everyone just fucking used his name as if it was an advertising tool.

10..Was it Stash the one who came up with the idea of putting on the sticker on the album?
Alan: Oh yeah, that must have been Stash, yeah. Keith played on that as a friend.

Changing the subject now…A few years ago you worked with John Sinclair, who used to manage the MC5, and also an activist.
Alan: Not just the manager, he was the inspiration, he was a lot more to it.

That´s right, in fact he was one of the founders of the White Panther Party. But hen again, you worked with him in his “Beatnik Youth album in 2012. I saw that video on YouTube that…
Alan:
Oh but that’s different to “Beatnik Youth” Well, you know, John Sinclair and the MC5. I didn’t come across him, really. My knowledge of MC5 came from Brian James. And I got a phone call from George Butler, the drummer before Danny in the band, and he went “I got a friend of mine, Tim, from Brighton, who would like to do recording with John Sinclair. Can we do some recording in the studio” And I said “yeah, of course” So John Sinclair came over. I found out about him, I was intrigued about him…And he came over and, like when I met Keith, it was almost the same, I instantly bonded with John. I thought “another kindred spirit!”

11..

John Sinclair, a legend in b&w

Yeah, he came a long way.
Alan: Yeah, he’s been around. And at the time of “West 12 to Wittering”, Youth produced some of it. You know “She’s a Real Boticelli”, the single…

Oh I love that song! That’s one of my favourites.
Alan: If you asked me how I wrote that…Youth produced the single, A Youth mix. You know Youth, he produced The Verve. He was the bass player in Killing Joke. He’s fine when producing. He’d done The Verve, he’s got a band with Paul McCartney. He’s a really great bloke. Told him that I had met John Sinclair, and he produced “Lock and Key”, and he said “why don’t we do an album?” So we wrote an album.
Danny: That’s cool.
Alan: Yeah. It’s waiting to come out as well. Fuck it, it’s a fantastic album! The sort of music I’ve never really been involved into, ‘cause Youth comes from different areas. We’ve known each other for a long time. And John Sinclair, that was it. ‘Cause John was going around Europe playing, he lives in Amsterdam now, and he’d be picking up these generic bar bands that would be in a bar, and they would just played blues, and he’d do his bit of poetry over it. What me and Youth wanted to do was taking it to song level, so he had an album with actual songs, not just generic blues with beat of poetry. So we used his beat poetry as the verses, and we got choruses. So he turned them into songs.

Would you say you were part of the London punk scene, or was it general rock’n’roll?
Alan:
No, I came after with the Dirty Strangers. When Punk was going, I loved Punk, it was fuckin’ great, ‘cause it took me from being a bloke that only got to play in his bedroom to someone that believed that could form a band. And I really did. And I could always write songs. I could always write poetry and stuff like that, so I loved the punk scene. At the time in 1976, I was 22, and all the punks were pretending to be 16, 17…All the punks like Mick Jones, Tony James, they were my age. 22 or 23. So even when I wasn’t in a band, I knew Mick Jones before he was in The Clash, because I used to work in Shepherd’s Bush’s Hammersmith College of Art’s building, and he was an art student there. His first gig supporting The Kursaal Flyers at the Roundhouse. So I felt connected to the Punk scene because I knew Mick. It was a heavily West London-influenced scene, so I was right in the middle of it anyway. And they were all my age. And about that time I was doing Security at all the concerts, so I’d see all the bands. And I’d say it definitely inspired me to form a rock’n’roll band. All the punk bands I liked were really rock’n’roll bands with a new energy.

You always seemed to me to be deep into ‘50s and ‘60s stuff.
Alan:
Oh I just love rock’n’roll, you know.  What I love more than anything? Seeing women dance when we’re playing…

12..WITTERING HEIGHTS
I’d like to talk a bit about the “West 12 to Wittering” album. Once again, we know that Keith played piano there, and he actually plays in a several songs. So does Ronnie Wood. Plus it’s not only my favourite Dirtys’ album, but one of the few albums that I’m always playing at home ever since I got it. That’s how much I love it.
Alan:
Thank you, thank you very much.

And just a few days ago I was walking down the streets here in London playing it on my iPod, and it’s an album that gives you that perfect London atmosphere…
Alan:
Of course, it’s about London, definitely.

I mean, you don’t play Madonna when you’re walking down in London.
Alan: Hahaha! Yeah, the Dirty Strangers is a good choice. And the story about it is, I’d just done the ‘A Bigger Bang’ tour with the Stones, and the Dirty Strangers hadn’t been going for about 8 years.  I’ve done the ‘A Bigger Bang’ tour for about 2 and a half years, and while I was away I wrote a lot of songs, and when I came back I decided I wanted to get the band back together, but at the time it was only me, John Proctor, and George Butler, just a 3-piece, and we were called Monkey Seed.

You changed the name of the band?
Alan: No. What happened was, the Dirty Strangers were sort of dissolved, we never split up. We’d hadn’t played for too long, not earning any money and, you know people get demotivated. So when I decided to get the band back together, I wanted it to be a fresh start. So I wanted a new name. I wasn’t gonna do any Dirty Strangers songs, only new songs. But I wrote all the Dirty Strangers’ songs anyway. So I went to Ian Grant, which just got Track Records, and I said to him, “I’ve got this album of songs. Do you fancy signing me to Track Records?” He said ye. He likes the stuff I’m doing.  And he said “why are you changing the name?” I said “well, because I want a fresh start” And he said “Alan you’re 50-odd” (laughs) “You’re not twenty anymore!” And he was right! He said “listen, you’ve got all this reputation as the Dirty Strangers, basically you are  the Dirty Strangers. Why would you change the name? It never gone wrong for the Dirty Strangers” So he said, “I advise you to call the band the Dirty Strangers”. And I went “all right” Sometimes you’re happy for people to tell you this stuff, ‘cause you don’t realize it sometimes. You think, “yeah I have a new band, I’m gonna call it this, I’m not gonna do The Dirty Strangers” So we got that together, I told Keith, and he said “do you want me to play guitar on it?”, and I went “no, I’m playing guitar on this one” And I said “can you play piano on it?” And he went “yeah, fuckin’ of course!”, you know. And that’s why it’s called “West 12 to Wittering”, because he lives in Wittering, and I took my recording gear from here (W12), and we set up camp.

13..

Alan Clayton, ex-bass player John Proctor and drummer Danny Fury

Where did you record it?
Alan: In Redlands. His stuff, the piano, was recorded in Redlands.

So you stayed with him at the time there?
Alan: Oh, I stayed with him lots of different times.

It’s beautiful in there, isn’t it?
Alan: Yeah, lovely. So much so, if I moved from London, that’s a part of the world I’m gonna move to.

Small world, two days ago I saw Ian Hunter in Shepherd’s Bush and, as I left, I met this couple who live there.
Alan: Ian Hunter? Did he play Shepherd’s Bush?

Oh yeah. Just 3 days ago. He never played in South America, and he’s not likely to play soon, so I couldn’t miss it. With Graham Parker as support act.
Alan: Oh I love Graham Parker!
Danny: Do they advertise it these days?
Alan: It’s like if it’s sold out, there’s no advertising.

I’m sorry, now I’m starting to feel guilty!
Alan: I didn’t know that he was playing some time.
Danny: If you go to the websites, usually they’re there.
Alan: Usually there would be an ad in the Evening Standard, or in Time-Out.
Danny: In the past it used to be Melody maker, you found all the gigs in there.
Alan: Time-Out for me. Growing up in a band, was the place where they put all the gigs in, and now it’s selected gigs.

DIRTY, STRANGE AND CONCEPTUAL
What about “Crime and a Woman”, the new album? I know it’s a concept album.
Alan:  It’s a story that goes from start to the end, if you want it to be a story. If you want it to be a collection of rock’n’roll songs, it’s a collection of rock’n’roll songs. But there is a story within it probably for my own benefit, more than anybody else’s. It’s a story that goes for it.14..

Yes, you told me it’s an album you wanted to do in a more personal way, after I asked you why Keith isn’t in the album, and you said you wanted it to be “your” album.
Alan: Yeah yeah. Because the thing is, it is great having Keith as one of your best mates, but the downside is once you play your own stuff, whenever anyone comes to see you some are disappointed I’m always getting this continuous question, “Would Keith be playing with you?” or “Would he be turning up?” I understand why more people say that, but it’s not his band. It’s my band that he happens to play in now and then, it is  the Dirty Strangers. And this one, I wanted it to be representative of us live, what we’ve recorded.

Well, I still love the album a lot.
Alan: I love it as well, because it sounds great. “Keith, can you come and play on this?” And he’s great, but he’s not playing live with us.

You’re always writing on your own, you’re the only one that writes the songs for the Dirtys, isn´t it?
Alan: And now I’ve been playing with Danny for a little while. Danny writes songs, and sure he’ll contribute down the line.

But basically all the songs on the new album are yours.
Alan: Yeah, but there’s a couple like “Running Slow” and “Are You Satisfied”, which was co-written with Alistair… He’s been dead for 10 years. He was a good mate of mine. And “One Good Reason” was co-written by Tam Nightingale. And Scotty co-wrote “Short and Sweet” But really, it was my album.

What inspires you to writes songs? Is it everyday life?
Alan: Definitely, everyday life. If I have a lull in my life, like a lot of people I write better with my back against the wall. When I’m comfortable, when everything’s alright, I find it very hard to write songs, ‘cause my life is at peace. Don’t you find that Danny, if there is turmoil in your life, then  you write better songs?
Danny: Yeah!

Then there wouldn’t be any blues players.
Alan: Yeah, exactly.  It’s the hard time that make you dig in and dig deep.

And I believe it’s the same with writers.
Alan: Yeah. Well how many tortured writers and comedians we know? People that are manic depressive, they put this beautiful work out.
Danny: They focus on their inner turmoil.

Somehow you’re exorcising your problems, you know what I mean. It’s therapy.
Alan: That’s definitely right. If I have something strong my mind, I’ll definitely write a song about it.

15..

The Dirty Strangers today. From L-R: Danny Fury, Alan Clayton, Cliff Wright and Scott Mulvey

Out of the lyrics, you don’t find bands like the Dirty Strangers around these days. I mean, all that bluesy lowdown rock’n’roll with a punky edge….And now Danny’s welcome, so that means some fresh new blood.
Alan: Yeah, right!

MAYBE IT´S BECAUSE I´M A LONDONER
What’s your take on the current London music scene?
Alan: You know, can I be honest to you? I don’t give a fuck about the music scene, I only care about the Dirty Strangers. When you’re in a rock and roll band, you can’t care about anybody else. Really, because you fuckin’ love rock’n’roll. Don’t you think that’s right, Danny?
Danny: Yeah, you´re sort of caught up in your own thing, you know. But if I can maybe answer that thing, I’ve got a little different impression anyway, as I’m still a little bit interested in what’s going on. You put new stuff in the context of old so, in a way, if you want to release it to the world, you work. That’s what my interest comes from. It’s actually, like Alan said, it’s a limited customer, you know. But I think there’s a lack of personalities, a lack of true expression, everybody seems to copy something that’s already been done before.

Well, that’s because they’re only after the money.
Alan: Yeah yeah.
Danny: Either it’s music you just make for money, but there’s not much that really reaches and touches, you know what I mean, a genuine expression of a personality.
Alan: Also, I’m still discovering music from the ‘50s, you know how I mean, there is such a body of music out there.
Danny: So much music out there…
Alan: I’d like to know if there’s still music going on, with youngsters. It’s not for me to comment what 15 year olds like, ‘cause I’m not 15 years old, right? But at my own age I know what I do, I play rock’n’roll.  I see many bands compromise, but we never compromise, we just play what we play. During my career I have been really trendy, then forgotten, then trendy again. You just do what you do.

Yes, it’s just like you said, it’s always about going back to the past, there’s so much in there.
Alan:  I listen to the radio a lot, so I don’t shut myself from the outside world. But there’s still people writing great songs. With rock and roll I am very protective, you’ve got bands who toy with rock and roll.
16..As it was just a word…
Alan: Yeah, and I live my life for it. I know I’ve done it for a long time.

So, if I may ask, what do you do for a living out of the Dirty Strangers?
Alan: I’m Danny’s butler! (laughs heavily)

You know, I was just curious…
Alan: He’s from Switzerland. He has loads of money.

You know, people from Switzerland, they’re the rich ones…
Alan:
Of course they are! (laughs) They’re employing us all.
Danny: I have to change his name to James or something… (laughs)

18.. BOB & MARLEY & ALAN & JOHNNY
Alan, there’s a funny story involving you and Bob Marley I’d really like you to tell me about.
Alan:  Of course I’ll do! When I was working for Jimmy Callaghan, in the late ‘70s, and we were working at Crystal Palace’s Bowl, which was an outdoor concert in South London. And at the time the backstage area didn’t have dressing rooms, it was big tents. And it was my job to look after Bob Marley’s tent. Big Joe was there. And what happened, back then, security wasn’t like it is now. The backstage area had low fences all the way round, not a lot of security, so every Jamaican seemed to think it was their right to meet Bob Marley.  So they were jumping over the fence, trying to get in his tent, and I was the only one stopping them.

He was the big thing.
Alan: Of course he was, the big thing for Jamaicans. It was the spiritual man for them, and everything. And the people that were trying getting into his tent didn’t like the fact I might be in the way to stop them, as that was my job, and what happened was there was always commotion going on. And someone tapped me on the shoulder and said, “come in”, pulled me into Bob Marley’s tent. Bob Marley’s sitting on an amp playing guitar, and he rolled this big spliff. And all the time Bob Marley was just playing guitar they got me stoned to calm me down. I was 20 or 25 minutes in there. And then they sent me outside, ‘cause I had calmed down.

Come on, 20 minutes with Bob Marley, that’s a great story!
Alan: Yeah!

Were you into Jamaican music at the time?
Alan: You know, when I was young, my first music was ska. Johnny, my dad, was a teddy boy, so he loved rock and roll. He’s a singer, you know, I’ve done an album with him.

Yeah, I’ve read about that.
Alan:
And Keith’s playing on it, and Bobby Keys. That’s my dad’s album, Johnny Clayton.

Was it released? Or is a personal recording?
Alan:
No it’s not, but it’s gonna be released. Brian James, Keith Richards, Bobby Keys, Jim Jones (of the Jim Jones Revue) and Tyla, all playing with my dad.

19..All studio sessions?
Alan:
Yeah.  But this record, “Crime and a Woman”, we finished recording it at a place called The Convent who ran out of money but had already pressed the CD. Cargo distributed them, which we sell from the Facebook site, from the shop site. That’s the next release, my Dad’s album. The John Sinclair one was already out on another label, and the Dirty Strangers are about to record another album. But before that we’re gonna re-release the first one with all new stuff, outtakes… I think that my dad’s album is gonna be released at the same time of that. There’s only great people on that.


Yeah, great line-up! Can’t wait for that. So are there any new songs, or is it all cover versions?
Alan:
  No, all Dean Martin songs, and Frank Sinatra. So the band is Mallet on drums, Dave Tregunna, he’s bass player on it, Scott Mulvey of the Dirtys is playing piano, and I’m playing acoustic on it, and then we’ve got guest guitarists and a guest saxophone player as well.

Are the Dirtys going to play in other countries, or you’re more London-based?
Alan:
Oh listen, we wanna play everywhere! We have played in Europe. We’re at a new stage with Danny now. We really needed someone to be a bit more at ground level managing us, and Paul my son is doing all that.

He’s very enthusiastic.
Alan: Yes he is, he is his father’s son. So yeah, we want to play everywhere.

As a musician, is there anybody in special you would have liked to play or record with?
Danny:
He really wanted to play with me.
Alan: My dreams are true now, my dreams have come true! I tell you, if it wasn’t Danny (laughs) it would be someone like Otis Redding, he’s my favourite singer of all time. Yes, my favourite singer, end of story.

Oh you’re a soul man.
Alan: Yeah, but my daddy was a teddy boy, so I’d come out this weird mixture.

It’s all the same, it’s all great music, whether it’s soul, rock’n’roll, rhythm and blues. And then all those black guys!
Alan: They can’t speak like me, but I can speak like them! Hahaha!
Danny: They feel it from the heart, I mean, they’ve got that feel. And Alan’s got such a great voice on top of that.
Alan: Thank you! We should stop on a high now… (laughs)

20..y

The article´s author along  Clayton and Fury: The Dirty Three

Just like you said, it’s mostly about going back to the past, that’s when the greatest music was done. Just yesterday I was playing my all-time favourite live album, ‘Jerry Lee Lewis at the Star Club’ in 1964, which is like the wildest album ever. Now that’s real heavy metal. Someone even referred to it saying “it’s not an album, it’s a crime scene”
Alan:  Yeah! I’ll tell you a funny story that Ronnie told me, when he was on tour with Jerry Lee, he’d done a tour with him.  They were both walking through the hotel lobby, and this woman came up and she threw her arms around Jerry Lee, and she went “Jerry Lee, you smell lovely, what you got on?” And he said “I’ve got a hard-on, honey. I didn’t know you could smell it from there!”
Danny:
That’s awesome!
Alan: That’s a great one, isn’t it?

I love those stories! Any other stories you want to tell me?
Alan:
Do you want to know how “She’s a Real Boticelli” got written?

21..I’d love to. So when somebody’s a real Boticelli?
Alan: Well, I’ll tell you what it was, right? I was down at Redlands, and me and Keith were in the kitchen, cooking. I was peeling potatoes and Keith is preparing the meat. In England when you grow up there’s a set of books called “Just William” And the character is a boy about 13, lives in the country, he’s got parents and he’s got a sister, and he’s always having adventures. And everybody who’s English would know about these books. I’m sure every country’s got its own books, but it’s a boy, and he’s in a gang called The Outlaws who have a rival gang. There are all these strange characters who pass through his village. Musicians, tramps, fairground people…And they’re written by a woman. And all my life I was growing up thinking it was a bloke, and it’s a woman, Richmal Compton. So this woman has written all these fantastic boy’s adventures from the perspective of a boy. So we found out that me and Keith liked them, we found out a mutual love when we were growing up. And when the Stones’ office found out our love for the books they sent the books in CD form, so we used to listen to them while we were cooking. And one of them starts “she’s a real Boticelli!”, and actually someone says she’s got a real bottle of cherry, and we misunderstood that, right? I looked to Keith and he said “that’s a fuckin’ Chuck Berry title, isn’t it?” So it’s all from when we were cooking, from his CD, from his book. So we just nicked the first line out, and wrote the whole song “She’s a Real Boticelli”

Great story, and also coming from Redlands, just like “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and the gardener story. Oh you know that…
Alan:
Right!

All right, you know we could be talking for hours, but I think it´s time to leave, you’ve got to do a show, so let´s go there! Thanks so much!
Danny: Let´s go!
Alan: Oh thanks so much to you! And don´t forget your bag!

www.dirtystrangers.com
https://www.facebook.com/thedirtystrangers

 

CON ALAN CLAYTON DE DIRTY STRANGERS EN LONDRES: “SOY MEJOR ESCRIBIENDO SI ESTOY ENTRE LA ESPADA Y LA PARED”

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 13 de agosto de 2017

Y en el octavo día Dios creó a los Dirty Strangers. O algo así, porque, a decir verdad, la historia de una de los grupos londinenses de culto más particulares de las tres últimas décadas, y algo más, tuvo que ver con situaciones más terrenales. No hubo ningún día octavo de creación, entonces, y aquel Creador tuvo que conformarse con siete días para hacer lo que podía. Su lugar fue ocupado por Alan Clayton, cantante, guitarrista y, sobre todo, compositor de las canciones de la banda surgida en Shepherd´s Bush, una de las áreas más cosmopolitas de la capital británica.

1..

The Dirty Strangers en algún momento de los 80: Ray King, Dirty Alan Clayton, Mark Harrison, Scotty Mulvey, Paul Fox

Como en un programa de una obra de teatro, entender la crónica de los Dirtys sugiere una breve descripción de buena parte del elenco que la integra. Encabezándolo aparece nueva e inevitablemente el nombre de Clayton, corazón y alma del grupo, el encargado principal del cometido, o como aparece acertadamente descripto en la página oficial del clan: “La banda tenía una misión: cargar la antorcha del rock’n’roll de raíz, tal como lo inventaron Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent y Chuck Berry, pero con un chorrito del soul de Otis Redding, y una guarnición de actitud punk” El reparto que gestó los primeros tiempos en la biografía de los Dirty Strangers continúa con Jim Callaghan, el más recordado de los jefes de Seguridad en las giras de los Rolling Stones por más de tres décadas, hoy retirado, bajo cuya órdenes Clayton supo trabajar cuando aún no había tomado el camino de la música. También está el ex boxeador Joe Seabrook, amigo de Alan, que también era empleado de la empresa de Seguridad de Callaghan, antes de convertirse en el guardaespaldas personal de Keith Richards, hasta su muerte en el año 2000. La nómina se completa con Stash Klossowski De Rola (más conocido como Prince Stash), un dandy aristocrático de la escena bohemia de Londres de mediados los ‘60s, que supo ser uno de los colegas más cercanos de Brian Jones, y con quien hasta compartió una detención policial histórica en 1967. Completando la historia, casi inevitablemente, aparece el mismísimo Keith Richards en su rol de catalizador casual, que gracias a los roles de todos los personajes antes mencionados acabó convirtiéndose no sólo en el padrino extraoficial del grupo, sino también en íntimo amigo de, claro, Alan Clayton. Una cosa llevó a la otra y, con más de 30 años de carrera y cuatro álbumes editados (“The Dirty Strangers”, “West 12 To Wittering (Another West Side Story)”, “Crime And A Woman”, y la recopilación “Diamonds”), el ahora cuarteto (Clayton en voz y guitarra, Scott Mulvey en piano, Cliff Wright en bajo y Danny Fury en batería) se apresta a grabar un nuevo trabajo a comienzos del año próximo. Tal como lo vienen haciendo desde sus inicios, antes continuarán recorriendo su habitual circuito de clubes de Inglaterra, a los que ahora se agregan 3 fechas en España a fines de septiembre (en Barcelona, Zaragoza y Reus)

2..

Afiche promocional del primer disco de la banda, con la presencia de Keith Richards y Ron Wood

NO TE DUERMAS HASTA HAMMERSMITH
MADHOUSE
estuvo en casa de Clayton en noviembre pasado para entrevistarlo y repasar el historial de su banda. Para llegar a la vivienda de “Dirty Alan” (donde en su parte trasera se ubica un estudio personal de dimensiones muy modestas, en el cual se registró buena parte del recetario musical de los Dirty Strangers) hay que acercarse al área de Hammersmith and Fulham, al oeste de Londres, muy cerca de la legendaria prisión local de Wormwood Scrubs, lo que implicó, al consultarle a una lugareña por la calle solicitada, tras citarle el nombre de la penitenciaría para llegar a destino cierto, una pregunta inapelablemente divertida (“oh, ¿es que tu amigo vive allí?”) La charla también contó con la participación de Danny Fury (ex integrante de los Lords of the New Church, entre otras aventuras, y nuevo miembro de los Dirtys), de quien en breve también estaremos presentando una entrevista exclusiva. Por el resto, he aquí un delicado repaso sobre la vida y obra de los Dirty Strangers en las propias palabras de su creador, una tarea que le llevó más, bastante más, de siete días.

3..

Clayton, Wright y Mulvey, en una reciente actuación

Los Dirtys nacieron a mediados de los ’80, pero antes de eso, ¿qué hacías como músico?
Alan: La banda se formó en 1978. Quiero decir, supongo que empecé a tocar guitar en el ’76, o algo así. Yo era de escribir música y poesía. Porque la mayoría de la gente piensa que la banda comenzó después que conocí a Keith (Richards) Y el verdadero motivo por el cual lo conocí fue que teníamos éxito. En aquel momento, bandas como los Lords of the New Church eran muy grandes, pero los Dirtys ya tenían su propia escena tocando en el Marquee. Cuando sos joven, tu carrera se mueve velozmente. Entonces, tres años antes que conociera a Keith, en 1981, nosotros ya habíamos encabezado el Marquee.

¿Cómo es que se dio aquel encuentro? ¿Qué es lo que sucedió, en verdad?
Alan: Yo hacía todo tipo de cosas, y uno de mis trabajos era el de Seguridad. Joe Seabrook era uno de mis mejores amigos, y lo conocía de antes de conocer a Keith. De hecho, esa primera vez, si bien fue por un instante, se dio en el pub de Big Joe.

4..

The Verulam Arms, el pub de Joe Seabrook, en sus días de gloria

¿Joe Seabrook tenía un pub?
Alan: Sí, en Watford. Se llamaba The Verulam Arms.

¿Watford?
Esa es la ciudad natal de Elton John, ¿no? Queda muy cerca de Hemel Hempstead, donde estoy parando actualmente.
Alan:
Correcto, queda muy cerca. De hecho Joe también era dueño de un pub en Hemel Hempstead.

Entonces, Joe no sólo tenía el pub, sino que además hacía Seguridad, al igual que vos.
Alan: Así es, se dedicaba a ambas cosas, y nos volvimos buenos amigos. Joe era guardaespaldas de los Stranglers, y también de Big Country.

¿Cómo fue que entonces conociste a Jim Callaghan?
Alan: Yo trabajaba en Seguridad para Jim y su socio Paddy, y su empresa se llamaba Call A Hand. Y Joe también empezó a trabajar para ellos. Y ya que Joe tenía una estatura y una presencia inmensa, también se convirtió en guardaespaldas.

5..

Keith Richards y Alan, en algún momento de principios de los 80: amistad y guitarras

¿Antes había sido boxeador, verdad?
Alan:
Sí, se había dedicado a eso.

Y mientras tanto vos hacías Seguridad por las tuyas.
Alan: Sí, pero trabajando para Jimmy, para Jimmy Callaghan.

OK entonces, una cosa llevó a  la otra, y así terminaste conociendo a Keith Richards, de quien Joe era su guardaespaldas personal. ¿Es así?
Alan: Sí. Y debido a que Joe y yo teníamos una gran conexión musical, cuando Joe comenzó a trabajar para Keith, quiso que escuchara nuestra música, porque sabía que a Keith iba a gustarle. Fue en Carlton Towers, en Knightsbridge. Me llevó a conocer a Keith. Y fue algo muy divertido, porque fuimos a su habitación a las 11 de la noche, ya que yo trabajaba durante el día. Entonces le pregunté a Joe, “¿y, a qué hora vamos a verlo?”, y Joe me contestó “Keith no se levanta antes de las 2 de la mañana” ¡Carajo! ¡Y yo que había estado trabajando todo el día!

¿Cómo te sentiste en aquel momento? ¿Te sentías excitado? Supongo que siempre te había gustado Keith como guitarrista…
Alan: ¡Claro que estaba excitado de conocerlo! A decir verdad, yo prefería a otra gente, pero a mí siempre me había gustado el mismo material que le gustaba a él. Otis Redding, Motown…Siempre me gustaron los Stones, pero más me gustaban los Who, ya que eran más londinenses. Entonces, así fue como lo conocí. Recuerdo cuando entramos en su cuarto en las Carlton Towers, y Joe dijo, “éste es Alan, toca en una banda que suena como acostumbraban a sonar los Stones…” Y Keith dijo, “Ojalá vuelva a suceder, ya ha pasado un tiempo de eso…”

Y ésa es finalmente la historia de la primera vez que conociste al hombre que luego terminaría siendo muy importante en la carrera de los Dirty Strangers.
Alan:
Sí, tal cual. Y dos días más tarde Keith me dice “me estoy yendo a París ahora mismo”, y yo le dije “oh, nunca estuve en París”, entonces me mandó a su chofer, con la orden de que vayamos a buscar una guitarra para él, y un bastón, y me dijo “venite para París, y te quedás conmigo” Y yo lo había conocido apenas 2 días antes, sabés…

Y así fueron las cosas…Puedo entender lo de la guitarra, ¿pero para qué te pidió un bastón?
Alan:  El bastón era para Bert. El chofer llegó manejando el Bentley de Keith, me recogió y nos fuimos para París. Pero Bert, su padre, todavía vivía en Dartford, donde Keith nació, entonces, camino a Dover, pasamos a buscarlo. Y así fue el viaje. Bert y yo en el Bentley de Keith, más el chofer, rumbo a París.

6..

Keith y Alan, en tiempos más actuales: amistad y sofás

¿Y Keith?
Alan:
No, él fue en avión.

¡Debe haber sido un gran viaje!
Alan: ¡Oh, fue buenísmo!

¡Gran anécdota, y también gran forma de comenzar una amistad con Keith Richards!
Alan:
Sí, pero antes ya había estado en el estudio con Ronnie Wood. Habíamos grabado “Baby”, “Here She Comes” y “Easy To Please”…

Para el primer álbum de los Dirtys.
Alan: Así es. Correcto. Y también tocó en “Thrill Of A Thrill” Entonces, yo ya había trabajado con Ronnie, y Keith nos ayudó a conseguir algunos shows en París. Todavía no teníamos contrato discográfico, y sucedió al mismo tiempo en que Mick (Jagger) estaba grabando su primer álbum solista, y por lo tanto Keith no estaba ocupado. Así que todo sucedió en el momento justo.

Y todo gracias a Joe Seabrook.
Alan:¡Sí! Joe representa una parte importante de mi carrera, porque nuestros primeros shows fueron en su pub. Pero como te dije, antes yo ya había trabajado en Seguridad para Jimmy Callaghan. Trabajé en los shows de los Stones en Earl’s Court en 1976. Conseguía todo tipo de empleos de parte de Jimmy, como el de “despejar” prostíbulos en el Soho de Londres. Casas de prostitutas…

Sí, Jim fue muy bueno conmigo. Fue de gran ayuda en mucha soportunidades  cuando seguí el tour de los Stones en USA en el ’94.
Alan: Es un hombre adorable. Y, si bien conocí a Keith a través de Joe, Jimmy fue mi primer amigo.

7..

The Ruts, con Paul Fox al frente, lata de cerveza en mano

EXTRAÑOS EN AMÉRICA
Quisiera preguntarte sobre Paul Fox, fallecido en el 2007, que si bien era integrante de los Ruts, también fue guitarrista de la primera formación de los Dirty Strangers, ¿verdad?
Alan: No, no estuvo en la primera formación del grupo, pero sí en la primera que fue a tocar a los EE. UU. Y también tocó en nuestro primer disco. El de la primera formación fue Alistair Simmons, que también tocaba en los Lords of the New Church. Él es quien escribió “Baby”, “Running Slow”…Todavía canto canciones que escribí con él. Y cuando Alistair dejó a los Dirty Strangers, se unió a los Lords. Era un tipo encantador y fantástico, pero, sabés, no podía sobrellevar la situación. Y en cuanto a Paul Fox, fue muy divertido, porque cuando Malcolm Owen, el cantante…Conocés la historia de los Ruts, ¿no?

A decir verdad, muy poco…
Alan:
Los Ruts iban a salir de gira con The Who, pero Malcolm era un junkie y, carajo, tuvieron que cancelar esa gira. Tuvo un final muy desafortunado. Cuando yo trabajaba en Seguridad, veía a los Ruts y me decía, “yo podría cantar en esta banda” Y también eran de West London, por lo que también existía esa conexión. Y 3 o 4 años después de eso, yo me encontraba en la parte de atrás de un cine en Kensal Rise, en Londres, que ya no existe, tratando de conseguir una fecha. Y Paul Fox también estaba ahí, y viene y me dice, “realmente me hacés acordar a nuestro viejo cantante” Y yo le contesté, “sabés qué, cuando tu cantante murió, yo estuve a punto de postularme para el puesto” Y Paul me dijo, “deseo que lo hubieras hecho” Porque después que Malcolm murió, los Ruts cambiaron completamente de rumbo.  Y llegué a conocerlo, había subido a tocar con nosotros un par de veces. Yo ya lo consideraba un nuevo amigo, y me agradaba mucho. Y 2 semanas antes de que comenzáramos nuestro tour en USA, Alistair pudrió todo. Teníamos un mánager nuevo, y todo esto le iba a costar un montón de dinero. Alistair siempre estaba al borde de ser brillante, o fuckin’ desastroso. Estaba tan colgado que no podía tocar la guitarra. Y entonces mi mánager dijo, “no pienso poner un centavo para llevarlo a los Estados Unidos” Imaginate todas las tentaciones que podrían haberle ofrecido estando allí…

Huty21393 021

Oh yeah: otra toma de los Dirtys en sus primeros tiempos

Y así fue como Alistair no participó de la gira.
Alan: No. Fue toda una decisión, ya que era mi mejor amigo. Lo echamos 2 semanas antes de la gira por USA. Ese tour era uno de nuestros objetivos principales, así que lo llamé a Paul Fox y le pedí que forme parte. Y entonces se unió a la banda.

¿Cómo resultó la gira por los EE. UU. de una banda chica del circuito londinense que iba allí por primera vez?
Alan: Solamente tocamos en la costa este. No fue realmente un tour, duró algo así como 7 u 8 días.

¿Tocaron sólo en lugares chicos?
Alan: Bueno, tocamos en el Cat Club de New York, que es un lugar grande. Y después en lugares cerca de la ciudad, sabés…Boston, etc.

La primera vez que los Dirtys tocaban en USA…
Alan: Sí, y todavía no teníamos contrato discográfico.

¿Pero cómo? ¿No era que 2 años antes habían grabado con Ronnie?
Alan:  Sí, habíamos grabado con Ronnie, y después con Keith. Mick había editado su disco solista, así que Keith estaba con tiempo de sobra. Pero seguíamos sin contrato.

9..

Los Dirtys y Ron Wood: amistad y fotos tomadas de un video

¿Cómo fue que Prince Stash terminó produciendo el disco? Pareciera ser que siempre todo termina orbitando a los Stones…
Alan:  OK, veo que recordás eso. Stash había sido detenido con Brian Jones en los ‘60. Y cuando Keith vino al estudio a grabar con nosotros, Stash estaba con él. Si ves esa fotografía…Hay una foto  de todos nosotros en el estudio con Keith y Stash. Y momentos después Stash preguntó, “¿quién les está editando el disco?” Y así fue como formó Thrill Records, por el título de la canción que abre nuestro el primer álbum, “Thrill Of A Thrill”. Así que entonces puso en marcha el sello, y le dedicó 1 año completo de su vida. Quiero decir, se lanzó mundialmente, y anduvo muy bien. Todo parecía tan fácil en aquel momento, pero ahora uno dice, “carajo, me gustaría que ahora sea igual” Y Stash invirtió mucha plata en el álbum, fue genial. Tengo grandes historias sobre él. ¿Te acordás de Pinnacle, la distribuidora de las compañías grabadoras independientes? Cuando uno se dirigía allí, tenía solamente 20 minutos para convencerlos de que te contraten, y 45 minutos más tarde Stash les estaba diciendo que había sido un gran disco pero…

Entonces coincidió todo.
Alan: Coincidió, pero en lo que respecta a USA, todo empezó a andar mal. Lo que sucedió fue que, vendimos muchos discos en Gran Bretaña, y cuando Stash lo llevó a USA, usaron el nombre de Keith para promoverlo. Recordemos que antes de lanzar su primer disco solista, “Talk Is Cheap”, Keith ya había grabado con nosotros. Y cuando empezó a  trabajar en su primer álbum, que en aquel momento era todo un acontecimiento, en su contrato estaba especificado que no podía trabajar en discos de otros. Como siempre decía su mánager, “cuando Keith Richards graba con amigos, lo mejor es que la gente lo descubra. De otra forma, puede salir mal” Y en la edición americana del disco, Stash le había agregado una calcomanía a la tapa que decía “The Dirty Strangers con la participación de Keith Richards y Ronnie Wood” Eso fue justo cuando Keith estaba por lanzar un adelanto de su álbum solista. Y entonces nuestro disco se canceló en USA. No fue nada astuto al promoverlo allí. Todo el mundo usaba el fuckin’ nombre de Keith, como si fuera una herramienta publicitaria.

10..¿Fue Stash el que tuvo la idea de poner eso en la tapa del disco?
Alan: Oh sí, debe haber sido Stash, sí. Keith tocó en el disco como amigo.

Cambiando de tema, hace unos años trabajaste junto a John Sinclair, quien fuera mánager de los MC5, y también un recordado activista político.
Alan: No sólo el mánager de la banda, sino también la inspiración, entre tantas cosas…

Es verdad, de hecho fue uno de los fundadores del White Panther Party (N. de la R.: facción política de extrema izquierda anti-rascista fundada en los EE. UU. en 1968) Pero tu trabajo con él fue en “Beatnik Youth”, su álbum de 2012. Vi el video en YouTube en el que…
Alan: ¡Oh, pero eso fue otra cosa, diferente a lo de “Beatnik Youth”! Bueno, ya sabés la historia de John Sinclair y los MC5…En verdad no me crucé con él. Mi conocimiento de los MC5 fue a través de Brian James (N. de la R.: ex miembro de The Damned y Lords of the New Church) Y una vez recibí un llamado de George Butler, que fue baterista en los Dirtys antes de Danny, diciéndome, “hay un amigo mío de Brighton, Tim, que quiere grabar algo con John Sinclair. ¿Te parece que hagamos algo en el estudio?” Y yo le dije, “sí, por supuesto” Entonces vino Sinclair. Pero yo seguía intrigado sobre él. Y cuando llegó, fue casi lo mismo que cuando conocí a Keith, me conecté con él instantáneamente. Pensé, “oh, ¡otro espíritu afín!”

11..

John Sinclair, una leyenda en blanco y negro

Desde ya, hace rato que venía haciendo cosas…
Alan: Sí, anduvo por ahí…Y cuando editamos el álbum “West 12 to Wittering”, Youth, que había tyrabajado con Sinclair, produjo parte del disco, como fue el caso de la canción “She´s A Real Boticelli”, el single de difusión…

¡Amo esa canción! Es una de mis favoritas.
Alan:  Si me preguntás cómo fue que la escribí…Youth la produjo, fue una mezcla de él. Youth había sido productor de The Verve, y bajista en Killing Joke. Es muy bueno produciendo. Y también tuvo una banda con Paul McCartney (N. de la R.: The Fireman) Es un tipo genial. Le dije que había conocido a John Sinclair, y él había producido “Lock And Key”, la canción que John había grabado con los Dirty Strangers, y entonces me dijo “¿por qué no hacemos un álbum?” Y escribimos un álbum, que tiene que salir en algún momento. ¡Carajo, es un disco fantástico! Del tipo de música que nunca fue mi estilo. Porque Youth viene de diferentes áreas. Nos conocíamos desde hacía mucho tiempo. Y después estaba John Sinclair. Porque John daba vueltas por Europa tocando. Ahora vive en Amsterdam. Y siempre se metía en bares chicos, bares genéricos, donde tocaban blues, y él les agregaba algo de poesía. Lo que Youth y yo quisimos hacer era llevar eso a otro nivel, así podía tener un álbum con canciones auténticas, no solamente blues con pedazos de poesía. Entonces terminamos usando su poesía como versos de las canciones, y les agregamos coros, y así fue que terminaron convirtiéndose en canciones.

¿Podrías decir que fuiste parte de la escena del punk londinense, o fue más que nada de la del rock and roll en general?
Alan: No, yo empecé con los Dirty Strangers. Cuando se dio lo del Punk, que es algo que yo adoraba, fue fuckin’ grandioso, porque me llevó de ser alguien que tocaba en su cuarto, a alguien que creía que podía formar un grupo. Y realmente lo hice. Y siempre podía ponerme a escribir canciones, o poesía, así que amaba la escena del punk. En aquel momento, en 1976, yo tenía 22 años, y todos los punks simulaban tener 16 o 17. Todos los punks como Mick Jones o Tony James tenían mi edad, 22 o 23 años. Entonces, si bien todavía no estaba en ninguna banda, conocía a Mick Jones antes de que fuera parte de los Clash, porque yo acostumbraba a trabajar en el edificio del Colegio de Arte de Hammersmith en Shepherd´s Bush, y Mick estudiaba ahí. Su primer show fue como telonero de los Kursaal Flyers en el Roundhouse, así que me sentía conectado a la escena del punk por conocer a Mick. Era una escena fuertemente influenciada por la parte oeste de Londres, por lo que de todas maneras, yo estaba ahí. Y todos ellos tenían mi edad. Al mismo tiempo yo ya estaba trabajando como Seguridad en muchos conciertos, lo que me permitía ver a todas las bandas. Y puedo decir que eso me inspiró definitivamente a formar un grupo de rock’n’roll. Todas las bandas punk que me gustaban eran realmente bandas de rock´n´roll, pero con una nueva energía.

Siempre tuve la impresión de que que lo tuyo es más que nada el material de los 50s y los ’60.
Alan: Oh, ¡yo amo el rock´n´roll!, sabés… ¿Qué puede haber que ame más que nada en el mundo? Tal vez ver a las mujeres bailar cuando estamos tocando…

12..WITTERING HEIGHTS
Lo mencionaste hace un rato, pero quisiera que hablemos más en profundidad sobre el álbum “West 12 to Wittering” Sabemos que Keith tocó piano en el disco, de hecho aparece en varias canciones. Y también Ronnie Wood. Y fuera de eso, es sin dudas no solo mi álbum favorito de los Dirty Strangers, pero también uno de los discos en general aque más suelo escuchar. Imaginate lo que me gusta ese disco…
Alan: Gracias, muchísimas gracias.

Y de hecho hace unos días estaba caminando por aquí, en Londres, mientras lo escuchaba, y es sin dudas un álbum que tiene una atmósfera absolutamente londinense.
Alan: Por supuesto, es sobre Londres, definitivamente.

A lo que voy es, uno no escucha a Madonna cuando camina por Londres…
Alan: ¡Jajaja! Sí, los Dirty Strangers resultan una buena elección a la hora de hacerlo. Y la historia del disco es que…Yo venía de trabajar en la gira de los Stones de “A Bigger Bang”, que duró alrededor de 2 años y medio, y los Dirtys habían estado parados por cerca de 8 años. Y mientras viajaba escribí un montón de canciones. Entonces, al volver, decidí volver a juntar al grupo, pero en aquel momento éramos solamente yo, John Proctor y George Butler, un trío, y decidimos llamarnos Monkey Seed.

¿Le cambiaste el nombre al grupo?
Alan: No, lo que sucedió fue que los Dirty Strangers estaban algo así como disueltos, si bien nunca nos habíamos separado. No habíamos tocado por mucho tiempo, ni tampoco ganado dinero y, ya sabés, eso desmotiva a la gente. Así que cuando decidí volver a juntar al grupo, quise que empezara de cero. Entonces quería que tenga un nombre nuevo. No pensaba hacer canciones de los Dirty Strangers, solamente canciones nuevas. Pero como de todas maneras yo había escrito todas las canciones de la banda, me dirigí a Ian Grant, que acababa de formar el sello Track Records, y le dije, “tengo un álbum de canciones, ¿te gustaría contratarme para Track Records?” Dijo que sí, ya que le gustaba lo que estaba haciendo. Y entonces me preguntó, “¿por qué le cambiaste el nombre a la banda?” Y le contesté, “bueno, es que quiero un nuevo comienzo” Y Ian me dijo, “Alan, ¡tenés más de 50, ya no tenés 20 años!” (risas) ¡Y tenía razón! Después me dijo, “escuchame, tenés la reputación de los Dirty Strangers, porque básicamente vos sos los Dirty Strangers. ¿Porqué habrías de cambiarle el nombre? Siempre les funcionó. Te sugiero que la sigas llamando The Dirty Strangers”. Y yo accedí. A veces te hace feliz que exista gente que te digas cosas así, porque generalmente uno no se da cuenta. Uno piensa, “sí, tengo una nueva banda, la voy a llamar tal y tal…” Así que lo pusimos en marcha, y cuando se lo comenté a Keith, me preguntó, “¿querés que toque guitarra en el disco?” Y yo le contesté, “no, quiero encargarme yo de las guitarras”, pero le dije, “¿podés tocar algo de piano?” Y Keith me contestó, “claro, fuckin’ por supuesto!” Y es por eso que se llama “West 12 to Wittering”, porque cuando está en Inglaterra, Keith vive en Wittering, y yo llevé todo el equipo desde mi lugar aquí en el área W12 de Londres para grabar su parte, y es como que “acampamos” en su casa.

13..

Clayton, Proctor (hoy ex bajista del grupo) y Danny Fury

¿Lo grabaron en la casa de Keith?
Alan: Sí, en Redlands. Solamente su parte, la del piano, que fue grabada allí.

¿O sea que paraste en su casa exclusivamente para grabar la parte del piano que se usó en el álbum?
Alan: Bueno, en verdad paré en su casa en muchas oportunidades.

Wittering es una zona muy hermosa.
Alan:  Sí, encantadora. Tanto me resulta así que, si alguna vez me mudara de Londres, ese es el lugar donde me iría a vivir.

Pequeño mundo. Justamente hace días fui a ver a Ian Hunter en Shepherd’s Bush, y de casualidad, me puse a hablar con un matrimonio que vive allí.
Alan:¡Ian Hunter? ¿Tocó en Shepherd’s Bush?

Desde ya, fue hace 3 días. Jamás tocó en Sudamérica, y sería muy raro que alguna vez lo haga, así que no podía perdérmelo. Y con Graham Parker de telonero.
Alan:
¡Oh, amo a Graham Parker!
Danny: ¿Acaso salió el aviso en algún lugar?
Alan: Si el show está sold-out, no lo publicitan.

Perdón, ¡ahora me hacen sentir culpa!
Alan: ¡No sabía que iba a tocar en Londres!
Danny: Si te fijás en internet, generalmente aparece ahí.
Alan: En general aparece un aviso en el diario Evening Standard, o en la revista Time-Out.
Danny: Antes uno podía ver los avisos en el Melody Maker. Todos los anuncios de shows aparecían ahí.
Alan: Time-Out, para mí, habiendo tenido una banda, era el lugar donde aparecían todos los avisos, y ahora sólo están los que fueron seleccionados.

SUCIOS., EXTRAÑOS Y CONCEPTUALES
¿Qué me podés decir sobre “Crime And A Woman”, el disco más reciente de los Dirtys? Sé que se trata de un álbum conceptual.
Alan: Es una historia narrada desde el principio hasta el final, si es que querés que sea una historia. Si querés que sea una colección de canciones de rock´n´roll, es una colección de canciones de rock´n´roll. Pero hay toda una historia dentro del disco, que probablemente resulte para mi propio beneficio, más que el de cualquier otra persona.

14..Sí, cuando el otro día te pregunté por qué Keith esta vez no estaba esta vez en el disco, me dijiste que es un álbum que quisiste resultara más personal, y me explicaste que querías que sea “tu” álbum.
Alan: Sí. Porque lo que sucede es que, si bien es genial que Keith sea uno de tus mejores amigos, la parte mala es que, cada vez que tocás tu propio material, o que alguien va a verte tocar, permanentemente me hacen la misma pregunta: “¿Keith va a estar en el disco?”, o “¿Keith va a estar en el show?” Entiendo que la gente pregunte esas cosas, pero no es su banda. Es mi banda, que toca de vez en cuando, y se llama The Dirty Strangers. Y quiero que el grupo represente en vivo todo lo que grabamos.

Bueno, como sea, es otro disco que no deja de encantarme.
Alan: A mí también me encanta, porque suena genial. “Keith, “¿podrías venir y tocar en el disco?” Keith es genial, pero no toca en vivo con nosotros.

Siempre escribís solo. De hecho sos el único que escribe las canciones de los Dirtys.
Alan:
Y ahora que estuve tocando con Danny desde hace un tiempo…Danny escribe canciones, y sin dudas va a colaborar de aquí en adelante.

Pero básicamente todas las canciones del último disco son tuyas.
Alan: Sí, pero hay un par de canciones, como en el caso de “Running Slow” y “Are You Satisfied”, que fueron co-escritas con Alistair…Pero Alistair murió hace 10 años. Fue un gran compañero. Y después está “One Good Reason”, que escribí junto a Tam Nightingale, y además Scotty co-escribió “Short & Sweet”. Pero en verdad, sí, fue mi álbum.

¿Qué cosas te inspiran a la hora de escribir canciones? ¿La vida cotidiana?
Alan: Definitivamente, la vida diaria. Si tengo una pausa, o un momento de calma, al igual que la mayoría de la gente, soy mejor escribiendo cuando estoy entre la espada y la pared. Cuando estoy cómodo, cuando todo funciona bien, me resulta muy difícil escribir canciones, porque hay paz en mi vida. ¿No creés, que es así, Danny? ¿Que se escriben mejores canciones cuando se está alborotado?
Danny: Sí, por supuesto.

Si no fuera así, no existirían los músicos ni las canciones de blues.
Alan:
Sí, exactamente. Los momentos difíciles son los que te llevan a escarbar profundo.

Y supongo que lo mismo le sucede a los escritores.
Alan: Sí. Bueno, ¿cuántos escritores y comediantes torturados conocemos? Gente que es maníaca-depresiva, y que hacen hermosos trabajos.
Danny: Y se enfocan en su desorden interior.

Es como que de alguna manera lográs exorcizar tus pesares. Resulta toda una terapia, finalmente.
Alan: Eso es definitivamente correcto. Si tengo algo muy fuerte dentro de mi cabeza, sin dudas voy a escribir una canción sobre eso.

15..

Los Dirtys hoy: Danny Fury, Alan Clayton, Cliff Wright y Scott Mulvey

Y, más allá de las letras, no es fácil encontrar bandas cono los Dirty Strangers hoy en día, con toda esa cosa blusera y de rock´n´roll badass, con un filo de punk rock. Y ahora, ¡bienvenido Danny y la sangre nueva en el grupo!
Alan: ¡Así es!

MAYBE IT´S BECAUSE I´M A LONDONER
¿Qué piensan de la escena musical actual londinense?
Alan: ¿Puedo ser totalmente honesto con vos? La escena musical me importa un carajo, solo me importan los Dirty Strangers. Cuando estás en una banda de rock and roll, no te pueden importar los demás. Realmente, porque fuckin’ amás el rock and roll. ¿Lo ves así, Danny?
Danny: Sí, es como que estás atrapado en tu propia cosa. Pero si es que tal vez puedo responder a esa pregunta, de todas formas tengo una pequeña impresión al respecto, ya que aún estoy algo interesado en lo que sucede. Una saca nuevo material en ese contexto, y si querés que el mundo lo conozca, tenés que ponerte a trabajar. De ahí es que viene mi interés. Es realmente como dijo Alan, es como si fuera un cliente limitado. Pero creo que existe una gran falta de personalidades, una falta de expresión auténtica. Pareciera que todo el mundo copiara algo que ya había sido hecho antes.

Bueno, eso sucede porque mayormente lo hacen porque sólo están interesados en ganar dinero.
Alan: Sí, sí…
Danny: Es verdad que se hace música por dinero, pero no hay mucha música que realmente te alcance y te toque de cerca, quiero decir, algo que represente una expresión genuina de personalidad.
Alan: Además, todavía sigo descubriendo música de los ’50, hay toda una estructura musical de esos años.
Danny: Existe tanta música…
Alan: Me gustaría saber si eso de la música en sí sigue sucediendo con los más jóvenes. Yo no soy quién para comentar sobre lo que les gusta a los quinceañeros, porque no tengo 15 años. ¿De acuerdo? Pero sé lo que hago a mi edad. Y hago rock’n’roll. Veo que muchas bandas se comprometen, pero nosotros nunca nos compremetemos, sólo tocamos lo que tocamos. A lo largo de mi carrera, siempre me fijé en las modas, después me olvidé de eso, y más tarde le presté atención a la moda nuevamente. Uno simplemente hace lo que hace.

Es exactamente como lo dijiste, siempre se trata de mirar al pasado, porque hay tanta música buena ahí…
Alan: Yo escucho mucha radio, por lo que no me cierro al mundo exterior. Todavía hay gente que escribe grandes canciones. Y soy muy protector con el rock’n’roll, mientras hay bandas que juegan con él.
16..Como si sólo fuera una palabra suelta…
Alan:
Sí, y vivo mi vida para eso. Y sé que lo vengo haciendo desde hace mucho tiempo.

Entonces, si es que puedo preguntártelo, ¿de qué vivís fuera de los Dirty Strangers?
Alan: ¡Soy el mayordomo de Danny! (se ríe fuertemente)

Bueno, es que me resultaba curioso saberlo…
Alan:
Él es de Suiza, entonces tiene mucho dinero… (risas)

Sin dudas, Suiza está llena de millonarios.
Alan:
¡Claro que los hay! (risas) Y nosotros somos sus empleados.
Danny: Debería pedirle que se cambie el nombre por el de James, o algo así… (risas)

BOB & MARLEY & ALAN & JOHNNY
Alan, recuerdo haber leído una historia tuya junto a Bob Marley que me resultó muy divertida…
Alan:
¡Con mucho gusto! Cuando trabajaba para Jimmy Callaghan, a fines de los ‘70, una vez estábamos trabajando en el Crystal Palace’s Bowl, que era un lugar abierto para shows en el sur de Londres, y en aquel momento el área de backstage no tenía camarines. En su lugar se usaban carpas grandes. Y mi trabajo consistía en cuidar la carpa en la que estaba Bob Marley. Big Joe también estaba ahí. Y lo que ocurrió fue que, en esa época, lo de la Seguridad no era como es ahora. La zona del backstage tenía vallas muy bajas alrededor del lugar, y no había mucha Seguridad, y parecía ser que todos los jamaiquinos que habían ido al show pensaban que tenían el derecho de conocer a Marley. Entonces lo que hacían era saltar esas vallas, tratando de meterse en su carpa, y yo era el único que estaba ahí para pararlos.

18..Bob Marley era realmente “la gran cosa” en aquellos años…
Alan: ¡Claro que lo era! La “gran cosa” para los jamaiquinos. Era su hombre espiritual, y demás. Y la gente que intentaba meterse en su carpa, no le gustaba que yo los parara, si bien ése era mi trabajo, y lo que sucedió es que siempre había conmoción. Y de repente alguien me tocó el hombre y me dijo, “vení, entrá”, y me metió en la carpa de Bob Marley. Marley estaba sentado sobre un amplificador tocando la guitarra, y de repente se puso a liar un porro enorme. Y mientras Bob seguía tocando la guitarra, ¡me hicieron fumar y me drogaron, para calmarme! (risas) Estuve ahí unos 20 o 25 minutos. Y recién me enviaron de vuelta afuera una vez que me calmé.

¡20 minutos con Bob Marley! No es una historia muy común…
Alan:
¡Sí!

¿Te gustaba la música jamaiquina en ese momento?
Alan:
Sabés, cuando era joven, mi primera música fue el ska. Johnny, mi padre, era un “teddy boy”, por lo que amaba el rock and roll. Él es cantante, hice un álbum con él.

Sí, leí algo sobre eso.
Alan: Y Keith toca en el álbum, y Bobby Keys también. Ese es el disco de mi papá, Johnny Clayton.

¿El disco fue ya fue editado? ¿ O se trata de una grabación privada?
Alan:
No, aún no, pero ya va a editarse. Brian James, Keith Richards, Bobby Keys, Jim Jones (de la Jim Jones Revue) y Tyla, de los Dogs D’Amour. Todos tocando con mi padre.

19..¿Todas sesiones de estudio?
Alan: Sí. Ése va a ser el próximo disco que se edite, el de mi padre. El de John Sinclair ya había sido editado a través de otro sello, y de hecho también vamos a grabar otro álbum con los Dirty Strangers. Pero antes que todo eso vamos a reeditar el primer disco de la banda, “The Dirty Strangers”, pero con nuevo material, inéditos, etc. Supongo que el disco de mi papá va a ser lanzado al mismo tiempo. Hay gente grandiosa en el disco.

Es verdad, es una gran formación. ¿Va a incluir nuevas canciones o son todos covers?
Alan:
No, son todas canciones de Dean Martin, y de Frank Sinatra. Y la banda básica en el disco es Mallet en batería, Dave Tregunna en bajo, Scott Mulvey de los Dirtys en piano, y yo tocando acústica, y después están los guitarristas y los saxofonistas invitados.

¿Tienen la idea de salir a hacer shows en otros países, o son más una banda local que suele tocar en Londres, o en otras ciudades inglesas?
Alan: ¡Queremos tocar en todas partes! Ya tocamos en Europa, y ahora, con Danny en la banda, iniciamos una nueva etapa. Necesitábamos realmente que nos maneje alguien que esté más al nivel de la tierra, y mi hijo Paul está haciendo todo eso.

Se lo ve muy entusiasta.
Alan: Lo es, ¡es el hijo de su padre! Entonces, sí, queremos tocar en donde sea.

Como músico, ¿existe alguien con quien te hubiera gustado grabar o tocar?
Danny:
En verdad quería tocar conmigo… (risas)
Alan: ¡Oh, mis sueños finalmente se hicieron realidad! Te lo digo así, si no fuera con Danny (risas) sería con alguien como Otis Redding, mi cantante favorito de todos los tiempos. Sí, es mi cantante favorito. Fin de la historia.

Sos un “soul man”.
Alan: Sí, pero mi papá era un “teddy boy”, así que soy una mezcla extraña.

Es todo lo mismo, es música maravillosa, después de todo, ya sea soul, rock and roll, rhythm and blues…¡Todos esos grandes músicos negros!
Alan: No pueden hablar como yo, ¡pero yo sí puedo hablar como ellos! ¡Jajaja!
Danny: Lo sienten en el corazón, digo, tienen ese sentimiento. Y encima de todo, Alan tiene una gran voz.
Alan: ¡Gracias! Deberíamos parar aquí… (risas)

20..y

El autor de esta nota junto a los protagonistas de la misma: el negro es el nuevo negro

RECUERDOS DEL FUTURO
Es tal como dijiste, se trata mayormente de volver al pasado, que es cuando se hizo la mejor música. Justamente ayer estaba escuchando mi disco en vivo favorito de todos los tiempos, el de Jerry Lee Lewis en vivo en el Star Club de Hamburgo en 1964, que vendría a ser…¡el disco más salvaje que alguna vez se grabó! Eso sí que es heavy metal. Alguien incluso lo describió como “no un álbum, sino una escena del crimen”
Alan:
¡Sí! Te voy a contar una historia muy divertida que Ronnie Wood me contó, de cuando estuvo de gira con Jerry Lee. Estaban los dos caminando juntos en el lobby de un hotel, y apareció una mujer, que abrazó a Jerry, diciéndole “Jerry, olés maravillosamente, ¿qué te pusiste?” Y él le contestó, “lo que pasa es que se me paró, honey. ¡No sabía que podías olerlo desde ahí!”
Danny: ¡Es increíble!
Alan: ¡Esa es genial! ¿O no?

Me encantan las historias así. ¿Alguna más que quieras contarme?
Alan:
¿Querés saber cómo es que escribí la canción “She´s A Real Boticelli”?

21..Me encantaría saberlo. Siempre me pregunté qué es eso de ser “una Boticelli auténtica”…
Alan:
Bueno, te voy a decir cómo ocurrieron las cosas. Yo estaba en Redlands, y estábamos con Keith en la cocina de la casa, cocinando. Yo estaba pelando papas, y Keith preparaba la carne. En Inglaterra, cuando sos chico, es muy común que leas una colección de libros llamada “Just William” El personaje principal de las historias es un chico de 13 años, que vive en el campo con sus padres y una hermana, y que siempre está teniendo aventuras. Cualquier persona que sea de nacionalidad inglesa conoce esos libros. Supongo que cada país tendrá los suyos. Y este chico forma parte de un gang llamado The Outlaws (Los Bandidos) que tienen una banda rival. Y están todos esos personajes que pasan por el lugar donde vive. Músicos, vagabundos, viajeros…Y todos esos libros fueron escritos por una mujer, Richmal Compton. Y yo me pasé toda mi infancia creyendo que los había escrito un tipo. O sea que esta mujer escribió tosas esas aventuras fantásticas desde la perspectiva de un chico. Y nos dimos cuenta que tanto a Keith como a mí nos encantaban, que habíamos tenido un amor mutuo por esas historias a medida que íbamos creciendo. Y cuando la oficina de los Stones se enteró de nuestro amor por esos libros, nos los enviaron en formato CD, y solíamos escucharlos cuando nos poníamos a cocinar. Y uno empezaba con la frase “she´s a real Boticelli!”, pero en verdad lo que está diciendo es “she´s got a real bottle of cherry” (“tiene una botella real de cherry”) Lo habíamos entendido mal. Miré a Keith y me dijo “parece un fuckin´ título de una canción de Chuck Berry, ¿o no?” Así que viene de ahí, de cuando cocinábamos, del CD del libro. Entonces nos robamos la primera estrofa, y escribimos la canción “She’s a Real Boticelli”

¡Gran anécdota! Y agreguemos que su nombre nació en Redlands, al igual que la historia del jardinero, que se usó para el título de “Jumpin´Jack Flash”. Ya conocés la historia…
Alan:
¡Así es!

OK, saben que podríamos quedarnos hablando horas, pero creo que deberíamos salir para el show de esta noche, y no quiero ser el culpable de que lleguen tarde. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Danny:
¡Ya mismo!
Alan:
¡Muchas gracias a vos! Y no olvides tu bolso.

www.dirtystrangers.com
https://www.facebook.com/thedirtystrangers

 

CON LEANDRO DONOZO, DIRECTOR DE LA EDITORIAL GOURMET MUSICAL: “HAGO LIBROS QUE QUIERO LEER”

Estándar

“Querramos o no, la música es una compañía constante a lo largo de nuestras vidas. Aún desde antes de nacer, todo lo que escuchamos, cómo, con quiénes y cuándo la escuchamos, nos moldea y nos define de mil maneras. Nuestras formas de pensar, de ser, de relacionarnos, de entender, percibir y estar en el mundo están demasiado influenciadas por los sonidos que nos rodean como para ignorarlos o tratarlos con ingenuidad. Los libros de Gourmet Musical Ediciones quieren ser una herramienta para estar más conscientes de la importancia de la música y los sonidos, a partir de la producción y divulgación de textos que aporten nuevos conocimientos sobre su historia, presente y futuro desde los más diversos puntos de vista. Un posible camino intelectual para estimular los sentidos, el placer, la pasión.”

El texto que corona el catálogo del emprendimiento que una vez puso en marcha no permite dejar detalle librado al azar. Leandro Donozo, que comenzó recopilando libros y revistas del género para su propia información, terminó logrando de manera no deliberada lo que nadie había hecho en la historia argentina: fundar una editorial exclusivamente dedicada a libros musicales. Con más de 1 década de existencia, Gourmet Musical lleva publicados hasta el momento más de cuarenta títulos, a los que ahora se agregan algunos más, que verán la luz en el transcurso del corriente año. MADHOUSE estuvo charlando con el factótum del proyecto para repasar el pasado, presente y futuro de la primera editorial en su tipo en el país.

Gourmet Musical es un emprendimiento absolutamente unipersonal. ¿Qué es lo que hace que una persona se vuelque a juntar revistas, libros y textos varios de música, para acabar formando un archivo? ¿El proyecto editorial estaba contemplado desde le vamos, o empezó como el de un coleccionista que terminó derivando en eso?
En verdad nunca fui coleccionista, no me considero así. Como muchos de lo que estamos en esto, empecé a escuchar música de chico, y también tocaba y estudiaba guitarra. Al terminar el secundario me puse a hacer la carrera de Artes Musicales en la UBA, que es como una especie de carrera de Musicología, y paralelamente, de casualidad, empecé a trabajar en periodismo en Editorial Magendra. En Pelo, Generación X, y todas esas revistas que editaban. Y entonces pasé de leer esas revistas a escribir en ellas. Siempre había sido de interesarme mucho en la información, de puro melómano. En las tapas de los discos, en los sobres, preguntarme tal y cuál cosa… esos detalles a los que mucha gente no suele darle bolilla. Me interesaba todo eso que rodeaba la música. Era de leer muchos libros sobre música, biografías, revistas…En la época de la secundaria me compraba todas las revistas.

Y entonces se trató de ponerse a relacionar todo eso.
Claro. Yo leía Pelo, Rock and Pop, CantaRock, El Musiquero y otras revistas más fugaces que se editaban en esa época, y  a través de la guitarra también comencé a interesarme en otros tipo de música, entonces leía revistas de jazz, de acá y de afuera. Esto fue a mediados de los 80, cuando ya había muchas cosas importadas. Compraba muchos discos, sobre todo de blues, y traje muchos de afuera. Es más, la primera nota que escribí para un medio fue sobre blues. Entonces yo compraba y guardaba todas esas revistas porque me gustaba leer, y así poder tener todos esos datos. Por eso me pareció genial cuando encontré esa carrera en Filosofía y Letras, que coincidía mucho con todo eso que me interesaba. Y mientras cursaba el CBC produje un programa de radio sobre música clásica que hacía la DAIA en Radio Jai, porque tenían un ciclo de conciertos en el Teatro Colón, y el programa los promocionaba.

2EN EL PRINCIPIO FUE EL DICCIONARIO
¿No tenías ninguna idea deliberada respecto a lo que luego se convirtió en el proyecto de la editorial? ¿Las archivabas solamente para tu propio placer y cultura?
Ni siquiera consideraba archivarlas, simplemente las guardaba.

Desde ya, todo esto ocurría pre-internet, y la única manera que teníamos de guardar información era comprando material.
Avanzada la carrera, y en momentos que ya había llegado la internet, yo me movía mucho con listas de correo, y entonces de casualidad me llega una propuesta de actualizar un artículo sobre bibliotecas para la enciclopedia New Grove Dictionary of Music, que viene a ser la enciclopedia más grande internacional de música. La última edición se había lanzado en 1980 y entonces estaban haciendo la nueva, que iba a salir en 2000. Es una enciclopedia que, si bien es principalmente de música clásica, también incluye otros estilos populares y de todos los países. El artículo de bibliotecas incluía un listado larguísimo de bibliotecas especializadas en música de todo el mundo, incluyendo Argentina, que era larguísimo, como de cien páginas. Bibliotecas que incluyeran, sobre todo, fuentes primarias, como manuscritos o partituras. Material de interés para los investigadores musicales. Colecciones específicas, el archivo de un compositor, discotecas…ese tipo de cosas. Ellos buscaban gente que vaya a las bibliotecas, y con eso hacían el artículo. Se encontraron con que nadie les contestaba, y entonces me contactaron a través de una lista de discusión y me propusieron actualizar ese artículo. Y a raíz de eso me piden también actualizar el artículo sobre revistas de música de todo el mundo, que también era muy largo, como de 200 páginas. El de Argentina mencionaba treinta y pico de revistas, por lo que estaba muy desactualizado. Y había muy pocos datos. El nombre de la revista, en qué fechas se editó, una descripción muy breve y la periodicidad en que se editaban. Paralelamente yo venía haciendo un trabajo para la facultad, que era relevar la biografía que había sobre música argentina. La primera etapa de cualquier trabajo de investigación es ver primero qué es lo que se hizo antes, pero no había ningún tipo de fuente para saber qué es lo que había. Pero nadie tenía mucha idea. Mi respuesta automática fue “bueno, debe haber tanto, que no se podrá hacer”. Entonces empecé a ir a bibliotecas para compilar material sobre lo que yo estaba trabajando, que era música popular. Y comencé a darme cuenta de que no había tanto. Y después tuve la sensación de que segmentar entre música popular y académica no tenía mucho sentido. Y me di cuenta que esa limitación era conceptual, que para entender la música popular, como ser el rock en Argentina en los 60, tenías que entender otras cosas que estaban pasando. Tenés que entender que había un Instituto Di Tella y…

El contexto.
Ni siquiera el contexto, si bien había un contexto mayor político o cultural. Pero había un contexto musical que tenía una relación directa. Digo, Manal tocaba en el Di Tella, y por allí también pasaban los tipos que hacían música electroacústica. Y me parecía que mirar solamente al rock, como algo único, me impedía ver otras cosas que terminaban viéndose mejor, o de otra manera, en un contexto más grande. Entonces me puse a hacer el relevamiento sobre libros de música editados en Argentina, de todo tipo. Música clásica, tango, bailanta, rock, lo que fuere. Y ahí empecé a hacer algo que, años después, terminó convirtiéndose en el primer libro de la editorial.

3
Todo esto sucedió a raíz de lo que te habían encargado para la enciclopedia.
Fue algo simultáneo, porque de hecho yo ya andaba circulando por las bibliotecas, ya estaba relevando eso, y ahí fue cuando me llegó el encargo de la misma gente para hacer otro artículo, que fue el de revistas.


¿De qué constó ese trabajo?

Se trataba de hacer una lista de títulos de revistas de música de Argentina, con fechas. Cuando me llega ese encargo, yo me dije “esto se lo tengo que pasar a alguien que sepa más que yo”, pero qué pasaba: como yo ya venía relevando toda la parte de bibliografía sobre música argentina, sabía que no existía ningún libro que pudiera resolver el tema de las revistas o que incluyera un listado de títulos. Eran todas cosas muy parciales, muy viejas y desactualizadas. Entonces me dije, “esto no lo hizo nadie, lo voy a hacer yo”. Y aparte siempre me había interesado el tema de las revistas, ya sea por haberlas leído, o por escribir en ellas. Pero al empezar me encontré con otras dificultades, que son las que hablábamos antes. No había colecciones completas de revistas en ningún lado. Uno iba a las bibliotecas y, por supuesto, no había revistas de rock. Pero tampoco había colecciones completas de revistas de música clásica, de jazz, o de tango. No había nada de nada.

¿Tampoco en la Biblioteca Nacional?
Ni en la Biblioteca Nacional, ni en la del Congreso, ni en ninguna otra. Fui a todas las que pude. Incluso tampoco en bibliotecas especializadas en música. Había, y sigue habiendo, muy poco. En principio, con saber que existía tal revista, al menos ya tenía un dato. Pero ellos me pedían datos que no eran tan sencillos, como el de saber entre qué años fue editada la revista. Uno podía saber cuándo había comenzado a editarse, pero no hasta cuándo había sido editada. Entonces empecé a armarme unas planillas anotando cada número de cada revista que encontraba, y dónde la encontraba. Algunas las tenía yo, otras las iba comprando en casas de revistas usadas, otras eran de coleccionistas, de bibliotecas… ¡Eran unas tablas enormes! Entonces, cuando llegó el momento de cerrar el informe, algunas tenían fechas confirmadas, pero otras eran tentativas.

En definitiva, hiciste un trabajo que hasta ese momento era completamente inexistente en el país.
Sí, y tuve que hacerlo yo.

Lo cual resulta curioso habiendo gente de diversas áreas culturales que podrían haberlo hecho mucho antes, o con el paso de los años.
Sí había de otras revistas literarias, pero en cuanto a música, nadie jamás se había dedicado mucho. Nunca se la consideró una fuente de información, en es sentido siempre fue algo menos valorado.

Es verdad, siempre fue como la oveja negra de la familia.
Tal cual. Entonces, durante el tiempo en que estuve haciendo los dos relevamientos de las listas de revistas, me di cuenta que tenía una colección. Porque tenía las revistas que había comprado, las que yo había trabajado de adolescente, y las que había conseguido para ese relevamiento. Y cuando vi todo ese montón de revistas, me di cuenta que había que ampliar ese trabajo, si bien nunca lo tomé como una colección.

4

CAPITULO UNO
¿Tenías una fecha límite de entrega pararendir lo que te habían encargado?
Se trató de hacer todo lo que podía hacer hasta esa fecha. Pero después me entusiasmé y seguí.  Ya tenía la idea de hacer un libro con el relevamiento de bibliografía, y en un momento me di cuenta de que eso podía resultar una herramienta que le podía servir a otros. Lo estuvo por editar una universidad norteamericana, que al final nunca supe qué pasó. Entonces continué con eso, y en el medio surgió lo de las revistas, y me dije “bueno, aquí también hay otro libro”. Entretanto trabajé en un proyecto que fue el de desarrollar junto a Ricardo Salton un centro de documentación musical para el Gobierno de la Ciudad, con la idea de que tuviera un centro de investigación de música, y el de documentación con revistas, libros y partituras. Y entonces, como veía que el libro no salía, decidí editarlo yo. Y así fue como comenzó la editorial, con el libro que escribí yo, el “Diccionario Bibliográfico de la Música Argentina”, en el 2006.

Y ese fue el primer libro editado por Gourmet Musical. Y a partir de entonces decidiste crear tu propia editorial.
Sí. En el medio de todo eso, en 1999, me fui a vivir un año a Londres, para trabajar en ese diccionario, y cuando volví ya no pude conseguir trabajo de periodista. Fue en plena crisis del 2001. Pero antes del centro de documentación que te comenté, yo había armado un sitio web que se llamaba Gourmet Musical, que era una mezcla de base de datos con sitio de venta de publicaciones. Fue un momento en el que empezaron a aparecer muchas publicaciones independientes, pero que no tenían mucha distribución, sobre todo de discos. Entonces me pregunté, “¿qué pasaría si hacemos un sitio web que permita vender esos discos que no se veían tanto en las disquerías, de distintos géneros de música latinoamericana?”. Yo tenía una base de datos muy completa, en donde de cada disco tenías cada tema, cuál era su autor, quién tocaba qué instrumento en cada canción, etc. También había una base de datos sobre libros y revistas. La idea era juntar ahí toda la información de ese material disperso que existía. Pero en 2002 o 2003 se hizo medio insostenible trabajar así. El correo era un desastre, la inflación, no había catálogos… Y de a poco fui abandonando ese sitio web, porque no lo  podía mantener. Y entonces el sitio web terminó transformándose en la editorial Gourmet Musical Ediciones.

Siempre me pareció un nombre muy preciso.
Había varias cosas que me interesaban, pero Gourmet Musical son dos palabras que se entienden en cualquier idioma. Y tiene una cosa que es, ligado a esta cuestión de no definirse por géneros musicales, más allá de que nunca creí en eso de “la buena y la mala música”… lo de “Gourmet Musical” me permitía hacer una analogía con lo del gourmet gastronómico. Que es aquel tipo que no le da lo mismo comer cualquier cosa, que le interesa saber de dónde viene ese producto, cómo se cocina, las variedades…

¿Una connotación más de exclusividad?
No por ese lado, sino por saber qué es lo que uno está consumiendo, digamos. Uno puede comer cualquier basura y decir “ah no, prefiero esta marca a la otra”, o “cocinado así o cocinado asá”.  Y esa analogía, entonces, también me permitía explicar que yo no vendía cualquier música, aunque la vendiera de diferentes tipos. No era un sitio exclusivamente de rock, de jazz o de tango, pero al mismo tiempo no lo era sobre cualquier tipo de rock, jazz, tango, o folklore. Insisto, nunca lo entendí en términos de colección, para mí es una herramienta. La colección está más asociada con algo lúdico, si se quiere. Con el tiempo pasaría a ser una herramienta, ya fuere para las investigaciones de aquel momento, o las que ahora están en curso con los libros.

MÚSICA DE LA A A LA Z
Entonces, una cosa llevó a la otra, y finalmente el sitio web no sólo terminó volviéndose en una editorial con la cual ibas a editar un primer libro, sino que además era el tuyo.
Sí, la idea fue la de sacar mi libro, y después empezar a editar otros títulos que valía la pena que existieran, y que no había. Porque además mi libro se transformó en una especie de estudio de mercado imposible de encargarle a alguien, porque yo sabía exactamente sobre qué temas había libros, y sobre cuáles no. Sobre qué temas había libros que se conseguían, y al mismo tiempo conocía mucha gente que trabajaba en temas interesantes, pero que no tenían el acceso a publicar libros. Entonces conocía lo que existía sobre libros de música argentina de todo tipo, de una manera que nadie sabía. Y eso me indicaba qué proponer editar que fuera distinto a lo que ya existía. Lo de mi libro me sirvió de base para comenzar a armar el catálogo de la editorial.

¿Cómo hiciste para llevar a cabo semejante trabajo en tu primer libro?
Lo que hice fue revistar cincuenta y pico de diccionarios y enciclopedias de acá y de afuera sobre cualquier género musical, desde los veinte tomos del diccionario Grove, más la edición siguiente, que fueron veintinueve, más los diccionarios argentinos de jazz, de tango, de rock, de instrumentos, de alguna ciudad… Cosas muy puntuales, relevando todas las entradas que había sobre músicos y música argentina. Entonces, por ejemplo, si vos buscás “Troilo”, te dice en qué diccionarios salió un artículo sobre Troilo, en qué página, y quién lo escribió. O un artículo sobre el arpa en Argentina. ¿Dónde hay? Esos 52 diccionarios que mencioné no están juntos en ningún lugar, no hay ninguna biblioteca que los reúna en su totalidad. Y de esa manera, con una sola búsqueda te ahorrabas el buscar el dato en otros lugares. Corrigiendo datos que estaban mal, actualizando otros que ya eran viejos… Tardé como diez años en hacerlo.

Fue un laburo de hormiga.
Así es, un laburo de hormiga. Es más, yo empecé a trabajar en la editorial en febrero de 2005 y el primer libro, que fue éste, salió en agosto de 2006. Y todo ese tiempo que pasó se trató de terminarlo, armarlo, pensar la colección, el diseño, cómo armar la editorial, que es algo que aprendí mientras lo hacía.

“HAGO LIBROS QUE QUIERO LEER. Y ME TOMO TODO EL TIEMPO NECESARIO PARA QUE SALGAN BIEN. YO LA LLAMO LA EDITORIAL RENÉ LAVAND: ¡NO SE PUEDE HACER MÁS LENTO!” – LEANDRO DONOZO

¿Habías tenido la idea de la editorial desde un primer momento, o fue algo que surgió a partir del lanzamiento de tu libro?
Es algo que estaba previsto desde el principio, nunca lo saqué con la intención de editar un solo libro. Al editarlo, ya había decidido que iba a ser una editorial especializada en libros de música, por lo tanto ya estaba encargando otros títulos.

¿Qué fue lo que te llevó a convencerte que un proyecto así podía convertirse en algo redituable?
¡Lo sé, fue una pelotudez! (Risas) Ésta es la primera editorial dedicada exclusivamente a libros de música. No existía otra.

Es verdad, la primera de la historia en el país.
Sí, cosa que sé perfectamente porque me había leído todos los libros que había. Digo, había otras editoriales que habían editado muchos libros de música, como Corregidor, pero también habían sacado cosas de otros estilos. Gourmet Musical es la primera editorial argentina en la historia dedicada exclusivamente a libros musicales, más allá de otras como Ricordi, que básicamente editan partituras. Me interesaba mucho la circulación del conocimiento sobre música, porque veía que había muchas cosas muy interesantes que quedaban circunscriptas a un ámbito académico muy cerrado, o que en el periodismo más comercial se trabajaba con muchas limitaciones y no se profundizaba en muchos temas, entonces esos temas quedaban afuera. Eran notas de 2 ó 3 páginas, con las que no llegás a profundizar en nada. Yo estaba a medio camino entre el periodismo, las revistas que estaban en los kioscos, las de musicología, la universidad, las bibliotecas… En esa especie de intersección de muchas cosas. Y veía que ninguno de esos ámbitos me terminaba de cerrar. Y estos libros eran una forma de mezclar todo ese tipo de cosas, de trabajar con el rigor de la universidad, con la extensión de un libro –que tiene más profundidad–, trabajar el lenguaje y las formas de contar los resultados, que es algo más propio del periodismo, y básicamente hacerlo sobre temas de los cuáles no había libros, o no existía material disponible.

Pudiste nuclear todas esas actividades periféricas en una.
Y aparte me di cuenta de que con ese proyecto vinculaba muchas cosas que había hecho a lo largo del tiempo de manera más suelta. El periodismo, la investigación, lo de las bibliotecas, lo de las revistas, leer muchos libros, estar rodeado de discos y escucharlos, mirar los datos… Todo ese tipo de cosas confluían en la editorial, sin que yo lo hubiera planificado. Y saqué la cuenta de que si más o menos yo ahorraba una guita por mes, mientras me dedicaba a otras cosas, podía editar un libro cada tanto. Y con un subsidio del Gobierno de la Ciudad que salió en aquel momento, pude pagar parte de la impresión del primer libro. Después de terminarlo y sacarlo, pude pensar -ingenuamente- que eso podía funcionar económicamente.

5
EL XUL SOLAR SALE PARA TODOS
OK, ya tenías el libro en la calle, y con eso el proyecto de la editorial encaminado. ¿Cómo fue que empezaste a ponerlo en marcha? ¿Te propusieron autores, o saliste a buscarlos?
Me pasó todo eso, fue a los tumbos. Los primeros libros fueron propuestas mías en las que hubo que convencer a los autores. Algunos llevaban veinte años trabajando en artículos. Pero después, no sé realmente cómo fue que circuló el dato, pero de repente tuve propuestas de ideas desde el principio. De hecho, el segundo libro de la editorial también tiene su historia.

Adelante, entonces…
Cuando fue el famoso diciembre de 2001, yo estaba todavía con el sitio web y recién venido de Londres, y aquí no se podía hacer nada. Todo mal. Gomas quemadas, piquetes, y yo tratando de vender discos por internet. Pasó ese verano, y en abril del año siguiente se cumplía un aniversario de la inauguración del sitio web. Y yo pensaba en hacer algún tipo de festejo, digo, antes que tirarme por la ventana. Entonces organicé un concurso de investigación musical. Conseguí un jurado de musicólogos de acá y de afuera que seleccionaran tres trabajos, tres artículos de investigación, a publicarse individualmente en tres revistas de musicología, con un premio de plata simbólico, que era algo así como 100 dólares, o 100 pesos, todavía. Llegaron un montón de propuestas, y dos de esos artículos se publicaron en las revistas, y hubo un tercero que jamás salió publicado en la revista que tenía que hacerlo… Pasaron como tres años, y entonces en 2005 le propuse a la autora que ampliara el proyecto para llevarlo a libro, que era un trabajo de investigación sobre música en la vida y obra de Xul Solar, y terminó siendo el segundo libro lanzado por la editorial. Y yo me preguntaba, “¿quién va a sacar un libro sobre la música en la vida y obra de Xul Solar?”

Precisamente, eso es uno de los puntos más interesantes de la editorial, que edita esas cosas.
Bueno, así fue como se dio. Lo saqué como si fuera una locura, y anduvo bastante bien, y tuvo mucha prensa. Viniendo del periodismo, yo tenía conciencia de qué había que hacer mucha prensa y promoción de los libros. Pero mismo el diccionario, que también era un libro raro, estuvo reseñado en La Nación, en Clarín, en Página 12, en la revista Genios, en Muy Interesante, en revistas académicas de Musicología nacionales y del exterior, de universidades, et., Un abanico muy amplio. Y así fue que saqué dos libros en 2 años, lo cual es muy poco.

Creo que no está nada mal tratándose de una editorial que recién comenzaba de abajo.
Claro, fue algo hecho sin nada. Y en el 2008 edité dos libros, uno que le había propuesto a un musicólogo llamado Omar García Brunelli, que es un especialista en Piazzolla, a quien le propuse hacer una compilación de artículos de investigación musicológica sobre él. Se habían hecho varios libros, pero ninguno que trabajara sobre la música de Piazzolla. Eran todos de historia, anécdotas, biografía…Y paralelamente saqué algo que también me resultó muy grato, que fue reeditar “Como Vino La Mano” de Miguel Grinberg, un libro que yo había leído de adolescente, y que estaba agotado desde el 92 o el 93. La verdad, contacté a Grinberg de puro caradura. Recuerdo que nos encontramos en un café en la semana que iba entre Navidad y Año Nuevo, ¿viste esas semanas que no pasa nada?…

Tu vida está regida por fechas claves…
(Risas) Sí, ¿viste esas semanas que no se puede hacer nada? Fue tipo un 27 de diciembre, esas fechas ridículas… Nunca supe cómo Miguel se arriesgó a publicar conmigo, con una editorial que llevaba nada más que dos libros publicados, y de los cuales uno lo había escrito yo mismo. Esto fue en navidad de 2007, y entonces se editó para la Feria del Libro del 2008, o sea, en mayo, junto al de Piazzolla. Fue una edición actualizada, le agregamos muchas cosas. Tiene algo así como el doble del material que tenía la edición original. Fotos inéditas, le agregué muchas notas al pie, notas de la época, más manifiestos… Es una edición recargada. Y así se fueron dando las cosas. Después de varios años, con 7 u 8 libros editados, empecé a trabajar con una distribuidora, que me permitió que los libros llegaran a todo el país.

¿El proyecto conseguía sustentarse por sí mismo?
No, al principio se trató de poner guita. También tuve algunos subsidios, gente que me ayudó, algunos autores que pagaron parte de las ediciones…Por eso es que tardé 1 año en editar el segundo libro. Fue todo pura inversión. Después de muchos años, y no me acuerdo cuántos, llegué a una situación en la cual podía editar nuevos libros con lo que producían las ventas de los anteriores, y sin tener que poner plata de mi bolsillo. Creo que recién ahora vivo de la editorial, después de 12 años. Pero también soy docente, y hago otras cosas. Pero recién ahora estoy casi dedicado exclusivamente a la editorial.

LA HISTORIA SIN FIN
11 años más tarde del comienzo de tu emprendimiento, ¿cuántos libros lleva Gourmet Musical editados?
Cuarenta, o cuarenta y uno.

Eso significa que prácticamente salieron cuatro por año.
Más o menos. También hubo algunos en que saqué seis o siete, sobre todo en los últimos años.

¿La editorial está abierta a todos los estilos de música?
Sí. Para mí el límite no es el estilo, sino el tratamiento de los libros, cómo se trabaja el tema. soy muy hinchapelotas con eso de dónde se saca la información. No me interesa que sean refritos, porque hoy en día ya existe mucha información. Una entrada de Wikipedia tiene diez veces más información de la que podías conseguir hace 20 años. Si vos pusiste en tu libro, no sé, “Troilo dijo tal cosa”, yo te voy a preguntar por dónde la dijo, o cómo te enteraste. “¿Te la dijo a vos?” “No, la dijo en un diario” “Aah, ¿en qué diario?”…

Dicen que dicen…
Exacto. Y entonces te voy a pedir que busques en qué diario salió, en qué día y en qué página. Si no hay forma de averiguarlo decí “suele decirse que Troilo habría dicho tal cosa…”. Un diario puede corregir un dato inexacto al día siguiente, pero no podés hacerlo con un libro. Entonces soy muy insistente con los datos, con la información, y con no repetir las cosas que alguien ya dijo, y que dijo éste, y que dijo el otro… Y aparte me interesa que los libros sean originales, que aporten algo nuevo a lo que ya había. Yo hago libros que quiero leer. Y me tomo todo el tiempo necesario para que salgan bien. Yo la llamo la Editorial René Lavand: “¡No se puede hacer más lento!” (Risas)

Los libros tienen además muy buenos diseños y artes de tapa. ¿Trabajás con algún ilustrador en particular?
Hace años que estoy trabajando con Santi Pozzi, que suele hacer pósters y serigrafías para bandas de rock.

Para terminar, ¿futuros títulos de libros que va a lanzar Gourmet Musical?
El próximo trabajo que estoy sacando es un libro homenaje a Miguel Grinberg, que cumple 80 años, y que entonces se va a llamar “80 Preguntas a Miguel Grinberg”, donde invitamos a ochenta personas distintas -desde músicos, gente de la ecología, de literatura- a que cada uno le haga una pregunta, que Miguel responde. También voy a editar un libro de Roque Di Pietro sobre Charly García, que es la historia de la carrera de Charly a través de sus recitales. Y además va a salir una reedición modificada de un libro sobre la obra poética de Ricky Espinosa, y una reedición de un libro de Oscar López Ruiz con anécdotas sobre Piazzolla. Esos son los más inmediatos, y se están editando en los próximos 2 o 3 meses.

¿Qué es lo que siente un editor cuando finalmente edita un nuevo libro?
Se siente como un aporte al conocimiento. Uno se pregunta, “¿cómo fue que lo terminamos?” “¿Cómo fue que nos dimos cuenta de que estaba listo, lo editamos, y ahora está acá?” Como si fuera un milagro.


LOS LIBROS DE GOURMET MUSICAL, COMENTADOS POR SU EDITOR

Diccionario bibliográfico de la música argentina y de la música en la Argentina
(Leandro Donozo, 2006)
6
“Como explicaba en la entrevista, es una herramienta para quienes busquen información sobre la actividad musical en Argentina, con más de 21.000 citas bibliográficas”

Xul Solar, un músico visual. La música en su vida y obra (Cintia Cristiá, 2007. 2da. edición: 2011)
“Un libro muy peculiar que, como describe su título, aborda la influencia de la música en la obra pictórica de Xul Solar”

Estudios sobre la obra de Astor Piazzolla (Omar García Brunelli, 2008. 2da. edición: 2014)
“El autor, García Brunelli, presenta trabajos de diecisiete investigadores y musicólogos de cinco países (Argentina, España, Alemania, Japón y EE.UU.) que hablan sobre la obra de Piazzolla”

7Cómo vino la mano. Orígenes del rock argentino (Miguel Grinberg, 2008. 3ra. edición: 2014)
“La reedición del libro clásico de Grinberg, que se encontraba agotado desde principios de los 90”

Leopoldo Federico, el inefable bandoneón del tango (Jorge Dimov / Esther Echenbaum Jonisz, 2009)
“Son dos investigadores que entrevistaron a Federico hasta cansarse. Una biografía muy interesante, sobre todo con muchas entrevistas a él, y también a otros músicos de tango”


Proust músico (Jean-Jacques Nattiez, 2009)

“Escrito por un semiólogo musical franco-canadiense, un tipo muy importante. Acá llegó a haber seminarios sobre su obra. Nattiez ya lo había editado en francés, en inglés, en alemán, en muchos idiomas, pero quería lanzarlo en español”

“Guía de revistas de música de la Argentina (1829-2007) (Leandro Donozo, 2009)8
“Conseguí un subsidio para pagar parte de la impresión. Es un catálogo de revistas de música de Argentina, tal como lo indica su título, de todos los géneros musicales. Ahí detallo cada revista que encontré, quién escribió en cada una de ellas, y en qué archivo o biblioteca hallé cada número, por esa cuestión de que no hay colecciones completas en ningún lado. Hay 450 títulos de revistas”

Tito Francia y la música en Mendoza, de la radio al Nuevo Cancionero (María Inés García, 2009)
“Lo escribió una investigadora mendocina, a quien yo conocía del ámbito de los congresos de musicología. Ella había terminado su tesis sobre Tito Francia, un tipo no tan conocido por sí mismo, pero que era el guitarrista del grupo Nuevo Cancionero, que fue un grupo de renovación folklórica en los 60, de las cuales la más conocida es Mercedes Sosa y donde también estaba Tejada Gómez, etc. Y Tito Francia era el más músico de todos esos. Se habían escrito artículos sobre él, pero nunca un libro”

9

Estudios sobre los estilos compositivos del tango (1920-1935) (Pablo Kohan, 2010)
“Escrito por un periodista y musicólogo que había sido maestro mío en la Facultad, uno de los primeros que se dedicó a estudiar el tango desde la musicología, desde cómo suena el tango. Sabía que tenía muchos artículos sueltos publicados en revistas, y entonces lo convencí de hacer un libro”

Música y modernidad en Buenos Aires (1920-1940) (Omar Corrado, 2010)
“Corrado es para mí uno de los mejores musicólogos de Latinoamérica y, si te descuidás, de más allá también. El libro es un ejemplo importantísimo de cómo hablar de música vinculándola con el contexto y con la historia cultural del momento. Un libro clave para entender la década del 20 desde lo musical”

10Discografía básica del tango 1905-2010. Su historia a través de las grabaciones (Omar García Brunelli, 2010)
“Ahí seguimos trabajando con García Brunelli, que había sido el autor del libro de Piazzolla. Y éste había sido un libro con la idea de que sea una fuente de referencia sobre discos de tango. El libro es como un diccionario breve, donde en lugar de biografías de los músicos, te explica las discografías. Por ej., uno busca ‘Troilo’, y entonces ahí están las épocas en que grabó, con qué orquestas, en qué sellos, qué se reedit