AN INTERVIEW WITH ROBERTA BAYLEY – “THERE WAS NOBODY MORE PUNK THAN LITTLE RICHARD”

Estándar

By Marcelo Sonaglioni and Frank Blumetti

If this article defied its usual style and started by the end of the meeting described here, it should refer to the very minute before the “thanks and goodbye” to the person interviewed, when one of the interwievers took out a book about the New York rock scene in the late ’70s from his bag, of which the interviewee was one of its most distinguished witnesses, and then proceeded to point out the picture he wanted to be autographed. “I know which ones are my pictures, you do not need to tell me!” What could be taken as some real temper is nothing but Roberta Bayley in pure punk attitude, the same that led her to become one of the chosen few who was there to catch the Big Apple punk scene through the lens of her camera close-up some 43-odd years ago and beyond. More than four decades later, at 68, Bayley is in Buenos Aires to host a photo exhibition portraying much of her work. A one-week stay, from Thursday to Thursday,where she was extensively interviewed, and during which she barely had the time to get around the city, which she says reminds her of Paris. Bayley talks a lot, and does it passionately, so much that usually gets ahead of the questions which still need to be asked, even adding something that really seems to make her pleased: not to be inquired “once again” about her famous photo on the cover of the first Ramones album (which, although usually considered her trademark shot, does little justice for the rest of her career) And later on deciding to acknowledge it by refusing to stop when somebody informs her it’s time to wrap up the interview: “No, not yet, I want to keep talking”, and that we interviewers had no choice but to accept.

Capture

Punk rock scene witness: Bayley and her camera in the ’70s

You were born in the West Coast, in Pasadena, California, but what exactly made you move to London afterwards, and then to New York?
Well, I left southern California when I was 4. I asked my mother not to send me, but she said “we’re going”. So we moved to Seattle, and I lived there till I was 7, and then we moved again to Marin County, which is just north of San Francisco, a very nice area. It’s a very wealthy neighborhood now, but it was middle-class at the moment. There was nature and we had a house on the hill, and a view, you know, and horses and pets. Then after I graduated at high school when I was 18, I went to college in San Francisco. Unfortunately my sister had been killed in a car accident in the same year, which was very disturbing. When I was 19, I had a boyfriend who was a musician, and we lived together for about a year. He’s still a very good friend of mine. And after my third year of college, I just quit, with not really much thought. And then I just said, “I’m going to London”. I bought a one-way ticket. The main reason was that I could be far away, and they just spoke my language, even when a funny accent, but they just spoke English there. Oh yeah, I was making a joke about the “funny language” thing… Anyway I’d always been a kind of anglophile, because I was a big Beatles and Rolling Stones fan, and all that, so I had an affinity for London, and I had a friend from San Francisco who was also a photographer, and who had moved there. We weren’t close friends but we knew each other, and he helped me with photography, ‘cause I was trying to learn. That was around 1970 or 1971, I think. Fred was staying in this very large apartment in London for free, and he said “there’s plenty of room, why don’t you come here?” So I just started living there, maybe getting a little job and working. I didn’t have a camera, I wasn’t taking pictures or anything like that. Out of that, I was really in the music scene, you had all these great music papers like the Melody Maker and the New Musical Express, and occasionally I’d go to music concerts. That’s when I saw The Temptations, or Al Green, in 1973. I was a huge fan of him. You know, the whole white suite, and he played at the Rainbow. And then when he came to New York I went to see him at the Apollo, which was completely amazing, as it was a different show. He was really sexy, and dirty, and cool. But back to London, I’d worked briefly with Malcolm McLaren. I lived in his neighborhood, so he and his wife would use to come in the restaurant where I worked as a waitress. Sometimes he needed someone to help him out, but it wasn’t anything to do with music. Although sometimes we’d go see bands together, and there was this band coming up that kinda was getting talked about a little bit called Kilburn and the High-Roads. They were sort of in the pub rock scene, and there was a radio show on Sundays called Honky Tonk with a gentleman called Charlie Gillett, he’s the one who wrote one of the early rock books, “Sound of the City”. I became friends with Charlie, and he started to manage Kilburn and the High-Roads. So one night they were playing in White Chapel. And there I met Ian Dury, we fell madly in love, and we hitchhiked back from White Chapel. But then I was leaving back to San Francisco, as that was already planned. So we had correspondence, and phone calls, he was begging me to go back to London.

Did you go back to London?
Yeah, we loved each other, so I went back. Then we lived together. The band was really struggling, we weren’t making any money. We lived in a squat in Stockwell, that’s close to Brixton. But it was great music. The Kilburns were really a weird band. I mean, they had a black crippled guy in the band, they had a midget, they had this guy Humphrey Ocean…It was his fake name, but he was a painter. He wasn’t really a musician, he sort of danced onstage…But they were really good and the songs were really original. Ian was an incredible performer, and incredibly charismatic. He was crippled himself. He had polio and ended up with a completely fucked-up leg. But he was completely unique. They finally got a record contract and made this record, but it didn’t do well, so he kind of said “I’m too poor, you should go back to America, as this isn’t a good situation”. I think he was also having an affair with his previous girlfriend Denise Roudette, who was also a musician, and a very beautiful woman.

Maybe that was another reason to go back home again. 03
Well I didn’t know that but I suspected it, and I didn’t want to have a boyfriend who was cheating on me. And you know, you have to hate the girlfriend, so she hated me and when I left, she took my fur coat. But she’s a beautifully spirited woman and I have great respect for her. I guess she played for a little bit in the Kilburns. So I left for New York. I didn’t know anyone in New York at all. I had one friend I vaguely remembered that had moved from San Francisco, but I had a list of names that my friends in London gave me, like, you know, “I’m a friend of Ian Dury”, and this woman said “yes, come and stay with me”. She had a big loft on Church Street. This was in 1974. But everybody was very helpful. And then I started working and I made some money. My first job in New York was as a nanny, because you had a place to live, and you had a salary, but it was part-time. But then one of those people from the list my friends had given me, he was in the music business, he worked as a roadie, you know, lighting, sound man, for the Rolling Stones and other big bands. He was really nice, he showed me all around New York and said “so what do you wanna do?” And I said “I wanna see the New York Dolls, because I never saw them”. Because when they played in San Francisco, I was in London. When they played in London, I was in San Francisco, and he said he was their soundman in New York, and then he knew them very well. And next week they were playing in this place called Club 82, which was a club in a place that had been owned by the mafia, and all the entertainment there was female impersonators, what we would now call drag queens. That was the history of the club but, by the time I went there, it was sort of a little disco. It became very popular because David Bowie visited, so everybody would go there because of that. The new bands were playing there, so the New York Dolls would play there. There was a disco in-between, so everybody could dance after the bands. So that was the first band I saw in New York, and afterwards my friend threw a party for the bands in his loft above, and some of the Dolls came, and also the opening band, a band called the Miamis, who were unknown, but they were one of my favourite bands at the time.

02Yes, we did an interview with Gary Lachman (Valentine) two years ago in London and he mentioned the Miamis.
Yeah, they were one of my favourites. They didn’t have the look, they were just Jewish guys with curly hair. It wasn’t a punk look. They were pop more than punk, but they were very good songwriters and very funny guys, and their songs had a lot of humour, but they never achieved success. I met David Johansen at the party, and he was very nice. And the funny thing is, it was Club 82, and the Dolls had never played there, so they said “well we’re playing Club 82, we should wear dresses”. I had heard the rumours of the faggots and all that, so the first time I saw them, David is wearing a strapless evening gown, a ladies’wig, and women’s high heels, so I said “oh these guys are weird”, but that was their thing, it was kind of a joke. I think that Johnny (Thunders) or Jerry (Nolan) said “oh no, I’m not wearing a dress” ‘Cause they were really macho guys, they were so not gay, you know. The music business was kind of afraid of them because of their album cover. They were in drag and people didn’t understand it. You know, homophobia, and all that.

Looks like seeing the Dolls live was a major turning point for everybody who was part of that late ‘70s scene in New York. Everybody went to see the New York Dolls.
Oh yeah, they were huge in New York. Mick Jagger and David Johansen would be at Max’s Kansas City, and people would go to David. They were bigger than anything. They were the coolest band, they had the best girlfriends and they looked the greatest. Later on the Dolls’ success was kind of going on the downhill, but everybody could see they were having a really good time. They were getting all the chicks, they were getting all the drugs, it was fun, and that’s what rock and roll is, so everybody started bands.

04

Bayley, about the New York Dolls: “They were the coolest band, they had the best girlfriends and they looked the greatest

Plus they had some image, it was very striking at the time. 
Yeah. And that’s when Malcolm McLaren came to manage the Dolls, and he put them in red pant leather, with the Communist flag, and all that. But the Dolls were amazing at their shows, I saw them, and they had bands like Television opening for them. The newer bands like Television wanted to distinguish themselves from glitter rock, they wouldn’t gonna wear lipstick. So Richard Hell created very specifically and intentionally this new look with the short hair. Nobody had short hair. In rock’n’roll, you had long hair. And they would have ripped clothes because, you know, their clothes ripped, and then they would fix it with a safety pin. It wasn’t fashion, it was something practical to live.

And then nobody expected that it would turn out to be a fashionable thing.
Well, Richard kind of thought if they wanted to get attention, they had to be different. You know, Richard Hell did the T-shirt for Richard Lloyd that said “please kill me” onstage. Richard Lloyd tried to dye his hair bleach but it turned green…

05

Richard Hell, punk pioneer: “He was very much into the surrealists”

How was living with Richard Hell?
With Richard? Weird. He wouldn’t let me water the plants, because he said “let it die, it’s survival, don’t water the plants” And then we had a mouse at the apartment, and I wanted to get rid of it, and he said “no! The mouse lives”

What do you mean? A mouse living with you? Not in a fish tank or something…
No, he was a loose mouse. But then I killed the mouse, and I threw it away, and he went “oh where’s the mouse?” I never told him I’d killed the mouse. We were just living together, and that’s how we lived. You know, we were poor. It wasn’t mean. He was very much into the surrealists, like Lautreaumont and Baudelaire. You know he’s a writer, and he was a poet.

We tried to contact him recently for an interview.
No, he doesn’t talk about music, he doesn’t want to. It’s almost impossible to get him to talk about music.  And I respect it because, say, I’m doing all these interviews and I’m always being asked the same thing, over and over again. “What was it like in the ‘70s?”, etc. For him it’s extremely boring. He hasn’t done any music since the ‘80s. He’s a writer now. He’s published novels, books, articles…He makes his living as a respected writer. So he doesn’t wanna talk about punk rock. You know, I understand him completely.

That’s easy to understand…
See, just before I left for Buenos Aires, I had somebody to interview me about Sid (Vicious) and Nancy (Spungen), because I knew them both. So the first question was, once again, “What was it like in the ‘70s?” I said to him, “look, I’m not writing your article for you. There’s many books and articles written about that. You go to the library, and in 2 weeks, you phone me back, and then you ask me some serious questions, because I can’t tell you the whole story. That’s your job, you’re the journalist!” That was Richard’s philosophy, and I understand that. Five years ago I probably would have answered that kind of questions, but now it’s like enough already. Go to the library. I mean you don’t even have to go to the library, go to the internet, it’s all right there. So then you can ask me a relevant question that shows you have some knowledge, and you won’t insult me (laughs)

sidney-with-vicious

Bayley and Sid Vicious

Hopefully our questions are interesting… 
Yeah, they are, it sounds like you kind of know my answers a little bit. I enjoy interviews, but sometimes you get tired of hearing “how did you take the Ramones picture?”

Back in time, how you did get the job at the CBGB’s?
Oh, because I was Richard Hell’s girlfriend. Television was the only band that used to play there only on Sunday night. Their manager was Terry Ork, so he said “Roberta you stay at the door and take the money, 2 dollars” So when the people came to go in, I told them they had to pay and convinced them to pay 2 dollars, they were gonna see a good band, and that’s the deal.

Theres a funny story about that concerning Legs McNeil.
Yes, he came to CBGB’s and he said “I’m Legs McNeil”. I’d never seen Punk magazine, nobody had seen it. It was brand new, it just came out, the first issue. And I said “no, it’s 2 dollars, you have to pay me”. And he said, “no, I get in for free”. And then I said, “well ok, give me a copy of the magazine”. And he said, “no, it’s 50 cents, behind the bar, you can buy it”. So I said, “all right, that’s pretty cool, you go in for free”. So I went to the bar, picked 50 cents and bought the magazine. After work, I went home, and I read the magazine, and then I said “man, I gotta work for these guys, this is incredible!” They weren’t sure about me. But we decided to do something like a photonovela. That meant going around to different clubs, and I’d take the pictures. We did all these great pictures and we had this great chemistry and a hilarious time, we had a lot of fun. So they said, “well, do you wanna work for us?”. So from that moment on, I worked for them till the end of the magazine.

So you had been already working as a photographer by then? What took you to becoming a photographer before entering the music scene?
Yeah, that was in 1976, and I’d started at the end of 1975. I had interest in photography since I was a little girl. You know, I had a little toy camera. But then photography was becoming popular among people. But then in high school, when I was 15, I also had a photography class, which was very simplistic. But I learnt how to develop a film, and how to print. I loved photography, and when they graded me, I got more pluses than minuses. My photography teacher liked my pictures very much, and he would give me an assignment, like taking pictures which showed movement. He was a history teacher, but his passion was photography. And then when I was about 19, I bought a Nikon. I wasn’t doing any music pictures at the times, but I did street photography. But at the time photography wasn’t still considered a form of art, it was still the black sheep in the art world. But then when I came to New York, I met everybody in the scene, like I told you…Club 82, and I was working at CBGB’s, everybody was really interesting, so it would have been really stupid not taking pictures.

Any reason in particular why most of the pictures were only in black and white?
Yeah, it was a decision, because I had no money. But I shot a lot of colour, anytime I could afford it, or else I was shooting both. And specially when I became involved with Blondie. But colour is more expensive. I was also extremely lucky that soon after I bought my camera, I had this friend, and he said “oh I have this dark room that somebody left in my apartment, I’ll let you use it for 6 months”. The entire darkroom, which was very large, with everything.

07

Pretty baby: Debbie Harry through the lens of Roberta Bayley

You did a lot of work with Blondie, and they were a very colourful band anyway. It would have been such a loss to shoot Debbie Harry only in black and white…
Yeah, and it was the same with the New York Dolls. And I think about it, because I’m always saying to people part of the reason the Ramones cover made such an impression is because it’s black and white, but there’s also a New York Dolls first cover that was b&w. It was unusual for rock bands. Folk music did a lot of b&w, Bob Dylan too. But rock bands usually used colour. Elvis’ was black and white, his first album for RCA, the one that The Clash copied. I’d do both, I had two cameras, so I could shoot colour and black and white. But the Ramones picture was black and white, as it was for Punk magazine.  We couldn’t afford printing in colour. Printing was so primitive, you couldn’t mix colour and b&w in the same page, which now is very common. So all we shot for Punk magazine was black and white. Stupidily, Bob Gruen was there the same day, so he has the pictures of Debbie in colour because, he was rich, and he could afford it (laughs) I mean, he wasn’t rich, but he was richer than me.

1

The Ramones on the cover of their debut album

Who would you say were the easiest and the hardest bands or musicians to work with? I know you loved shooting Iggy Pop, in fact you once said you wish you had photographed him more.
Oh yes. That’s right. But then I retired. I can call him on the phone (laughs) There’s a very fantastic interview of him and Anthony Bourdain, you can sure find it on YouTube. Iggy’s just the coolest person, and his conversation with Anthony is done at at Iggy’s house in Florida.

Back to the punk scene, a tricky question, which one do you think influenced the 08other one? Was it that the New York scene influenced the British one, or was it the other way round?
Now you’re showing me you’re ignorant! Sorry.

It’s ok.
The New York scene started in 1974. London’s scene started in 1976. So who influenced who? It’s New York! London took all the ideas from New York. The safety pins, the ripped clothing, and all that. But locally the British guys were very talented. You know, Glen Matlock, Steve Jones, Paul Cook

I actually didn’t mean to be serious. I was playing games with you.
But you wouldn’t believe, when I talk to stupid journalists, I always say “go out, just do your history!” We started it.

The right question then would be, is there a link between both scenes?
Of course! Malcolm McLaren! You know, Blondie became big in England first, before anywhere else, because Debbie (Harry) was very beautiful, and they played in Top of The Pops…Blondie had many hits in London. But then when they came back to New York, they knew that Johnny Rotten had copied Richard Hell, that it was the version of him. Johnny Rotten copied him off.

Somehow most of the people always thought that the whole punk thing started with the Sex Pistols.
You don’t explain to me, I’ll explain it to you, ok? This is how it works.

09

The Pistols caught onstage by Bayley: “The Sex Pistols were never big in the USA”

All right.
The Sex Pistols became huge in London because they said “fuck” on TV. You know, their record was banned. You couldn’t even advertise it, but you could sell it. And so, you know, they were huge in the press. At that time nobody knew about any of the New York bands, except in a small area. The Ramones were still obscure, but when they went to London on the 4th of July of 1976 and played at the Roundhouse, there in the audience was The Clash, the Sex Pistols, etc. They couldn’t even afford tickets, and Johnny Ramone went to the window and let them come in. They were just kids, but the Ramones were aware of the fans and the kids, and that they were the future next music. I don’t think the Ramones felt threatened, but I think they were very pissed off when the Sex Pistols sort of became more famous than them more quickly. But not really in the United States. The Sex Pistols were never big in the United States. But England’s a very small country, with three music papers. It was a completely different environment.

And then it just happened the other way round when the Pistols did their last tour in the USA. How was the experience?
That was really insane. They were just fed up, and Sid was detoxing from heroin. As a drug addict, he felt terrible. We had an idea of playing these weird cities, obscure cities in the south like Memphis, Baton Rouge, San Antonio…But that was all intentional.

I wouldn’t say risky, but definitely tough places. Like people throwing bottles at them…
Well, we were punks, we would take it… (laughs) But that was part of what was frustrating for the band because the band was really good. I missed the first two shows of the tour. My first one was San Antonio, with many people throwing things at them, insulting the band, “fuck you!” and all that. They were treating them like freaks. But there were still people that liked them, although a minority. You know, when you go to the south, Tulsa, Oklahoma…there are people who are Jesus freaks, like protesting, the devil’s music, and all that shit. So they were just frustrated and fed up with the whole thing, and Johnny said, “enough”, that’s in San Francisco.

Why do you think there’s so much interest in punk after all these years?
It’s the last underground music. There’s no way now to stay underground, you’re discovered immediately. You’re discovered before anything, even before you go to the studio and play. That’s my opinion. I don’t follow music anymore. It was like the ‘50s, which was true punk music, like Little Richard. Nobody more punk. Elvis Presley, nobody more punk. People say, “oh punk was the most revolutionary music”. Oh no, ‘50s rock’n’roll, and even more, black music. You know, and then the mid-‘60s and psychedelic bands, which was a different kind of music.

Just to think of Little Richard…He was black, gay, he used lipstick, he shook his ass at the piano. And that’s in the ‘50s! IMG_3310
Yeah, and that was David Bowie’s biggest influence, and his first as well. I heard Little Richard as my sister was 7 years older than me so, even as that little, I heard ‘Tutti Frutti’. I loved Little Richard. And Jerry Lee Lewis, another punk.

What about New York’s culture? Do you think of any change involved in the last years?
You know, New York will always be a center of culture. Today, it’s very hard for artists to live there because of the high cost of living. In the ’70s you could get a loft, a huge loft, for $200 a month. Now that would be $10,000 a month. For young people now, coming to the city, I don’t know how they do it.

I guess it’s the same with many bohemian areas in the main cities. Like Chelsea, in London. It used to be like that in the ‘60s, and affordable, and suddenly big companies or big clothing stores arrive and they turn into expensive and fashionable places.
Oh yeah, it’s the same with Soho in New York. Because at the time it was dead. Tribecca was also dead. Any neighborhood you name. Only the Bronx is still probably rough. My neighborhood is too crowded now. It used to be more serene. But I never go out at night, so I don’t give a shit.
10How long have you’ve been living in the same place?
Almost 45 years, since 1975. It’s a tiny apartment, 400 square feet.  7 floors, no elevator. So I go 7 floors up and down. I have no choice. Or I could sleep on the floor. It means nothing to me, I’ve been doing it a long time. It’s quite healthy. And the other thing, it’s actually illegal in New York to have seven, so all the buildings around have six. So I have an incredible view, and beautiful light. Because there are no buildings next to me. This is what I say to myself when I’m on the stairs, “you have good light!” (laughs)

Regarding your exhibition, do you feel like an artist showing her works, or more of a witness of an era? Did you visit Buenos Aires around already?
Oh, both. I haven’t really seen anything except the gallery, the gallery, the hotel, the gallery…But I will. I long to come back.

Doesn’t it feel a bit strange coming down here to show your works?
I feel wonderful! I don’t feel strange. It’s a fantastic feeling, I’m very pleased and it’s really exciting. I get a little bit in New York. I also got quite a little bit when I went to Tokyo. You know, they’re also big fans of the Ramones and Punk Rock. I was like a mini-celebrity there, but still not as big as here. I don’t want to do it every day of my life, I‘d lose my mind.

So this is your first time in Argentina, but is it also your first time in South America? Not even in Brazil?
Yes. Not even in Brazil. First time down the equator.

What would be punk’s biggest legacy to the world?
It’s the idea of “do it yourself”. Don’t wait to be an expert. Give it a try, make a mistake, it’s ok. You know, if you feel like doing something, you don’t have to sit in your room practicing the guitar for 5 years, just go out with three chords. That’s all you need. Do it. Because that’s why we did. I didn’t know how to do photography.

One last question, considering lately we saw you in many pictures with your dog. So looks like suddenly you changed from pictures with “punks” to pictures with “pugs”.
Yeah, dogs and musicians are not different.

Anuncios

ENTREVISTA: ROBERTA BAYLEY – “NADIE FUE MÁS PUNK QUE LITTLE RICHARD”

Estándar

Por Marcelo Sonaglioni y Frank Blumetti

Si este texto desafiara la práctica habitual y comenzara por el final del encuentro que aquí retrata, debería referirse al instante previo del gracias y adiós a la entrevistada de turno, cuando uno de los dos entrevistadores extrajera de su bolso un libro de fotografía de rock neoyorquina del rock de finales de los ’70, de la cual la susodicha es una de sus representantes más insignes, y le señalara la foto de su autoría que pretendía le firmase. “¡Sé muy bien cuáles son mis fotos, no hace falta que me lo digas!” Lo que podría interpretarse como un estilo frontal y muy temperamental es entonces nada más y nada menos que Roberta Bayley en actitud fiel a su esencia punk, la misma que la llevó a ser una de las pocas protagonistas privilegiadas de la escena de la Gran Manzana que cierta vez llegó para dejar una huella eterna. Allí estuvo esta mujer en primera persona para retratar a través del lente de su cámara todo lo que pudo. Más de cuatro décadas después, a sus 68 años, Bayley, aquella fiel testigo de las andanzas sobre y fuera del escenario de sus protagonistas, aterrizó en Buenos Aires para presentar la exhibición fotográfica personal que muestra buena parte de su obra. Una estadía de una semana íntegra, de jueves a jueves, en la que fue exhaustivamente entrevistada, y durante la cual apenas tuvo tiempo para salir a recorrer la ciudad, que dice, por lo que vio hasta ahora, le recuerda a París. Y sobre la que confiesa fue tan bien recibida, que le gustaría volver en cualquier momento. A Bayley le gusta hablar mucho, y pasionalmente, tanto que suele terminar adelantándose a las preguntas de quienes la reportean. A lo que agrega un detalle que la emociona: el de que no la indaguen directamente sobre la foto de la portada del primer álbum de los Ramones (que si bien es su principal marca registrada, le hace poca justicia al resto de su carrera), que decide agradecer a través de un gesto singular cuando le avisan que es hora de ir concluyendo la entrevista: “No, todavía no, quiero seguir hablando”,  y al que a sus entrevistadores no le quedó más opción que aceptar.

Capture

Testigo de una era: Bayley y cámara en los ’70

Ud. nació en Pasadena, California, ¿pero qué es lo que exactamente la llevó a trasladarse a vivir a Londres, y luego a la ciudad de New York?
Bueno, me fui del sur de California cuando tenía 4 años. Le pedí a mi madre que no me llevé allí, pero me dijo “nos vamos”. Así que nos mudamos a Seattle, donde viví hasta los 7, y después volvimos a mudarnos, a Marin County, al norte de San Francisco, un área muy agradable. Ahora es un vecindario muy adinerado, pero por entonces era clase media. Con mucha naturaleza. Teníamos una casa en la colina con una gran vista, sabés, y caballos y mascotas. Más tarde, una vez que me gradué en la secundaria a los 18 años, fui a la universidad en San Francisco. Desafortunadamente mi hermana se mató en un accidente automovilístico en ese mismo año, lo que fue muy perturbador. Cuando tenía 19, tuve un novio que era músico, y nos fuimos a vivir juntos por cerca de 1 año. Aún es muy buen amigo mío. Y luego de mi tercer año en la universidad, la abandoné sin pensarlo demasiado. Y entonces me dije “me voy a Londres”. Me compré un pasaje de ida. El motivo principal fue que quería estar lejos, y aparte allí hablaban el mismo idioma que yo, si bien era con un acento peculiar, pero como fuera, ahí se hablaba inglés. De todas formas yo siempre había sido bastante anglófila, porque era fanática de los Beatles y de los Rolling Stones, y de todo eso, por lo que tenía una afinidad por Londres. Y además yo tenía un amigo de San Francisco que también era fotógrafo, y que se había mudado allí. No éramos amigos íntimos pero nos conocíamos, y me ayudó con lo de la fotografía, ya que intentaba aprender sobre eso. Eso fue en 1970 o 1971, creo. Fred vivía en un departamento muy grande por el cual no pagaba nada, y me dijo “sobra lugar, ¿por qué no venís?” Así que comencé a vivir ahí, me busqué un empleo y me puse a trabajar. No tenía cámara, no me dedicaba a sacar fotos, ni nada semejante. Fuera de eso, estaba muy metida en la escena de la música. Estaban los grandes periódicos musicales como el Melody Maker o el New Musical Express, y ocasionalmente iba a ver conciertos. Ahí fue cuando vi a los Temptations, o a Al Green, en 1973. Yo era muy fan de él. Con todo ese traje blanco que se ponía, y tocó en el Rainbow. Y después cuando fue a New York fui a verlo al Apollo, lo que fue alucinante, ya que era un show distinto. Era realmente sexy, y sucio, y cool. Pero volviendo a Londres, trabajé brevemente con Malcolm McLaren. Yo vivía en el mismo barrio que él, y solía venir junto a su mujer al restaurante en el que yo trabajaba de moza. A veces necesitaba alguien que lo ayude, pero no era nada que tenga que ver con la música. Aunque de vez en cuando íbamos a ver bandas juntos, y entre todo eso había un grupo del que comenzaba a hablarse mucho llamado Kilburn and the High-Roads. Es como que eran parte de la escena del pub rock, y al mismo tiempo los domingos había un programa de radio que se llamaba Honky Tonk, conducido por un tipo caballero llamado Charlie Gillett. Fue quien escribió “Sound of the City”, uno de los primeros libros de rock que se hicieron. Me hice amiga de Charlie, y él empezó a manejar a Kilburn and the High-Roads. Y la vez en que tocaron en White Chapel, conocí a Ian Dury, con quien nos enamoramos locamente, y nos volvimos haciendo dedo a la ciudad. Pero sucedió que yo me estaba volviendo a San Francisco, como lo había planeado. Hubo un montón de correspondencia entre nosotros, y llamadas de teléfono. Ian me suplicaba que regrese a Londres.

¿Y entonces volvió a Londres?
Sí, nos amábamos, así que volví. Y nos fuimos a vivir juntos. La banda estaba peleándola fuerte, pero no ganábamos dinero. Vivíamos en un squat en Stockwell, cerca de Brixton. Pero hacían una música genial. Los Kilburns eran realmente una banda muy extraña. Digo, tenían un tipo negro que era lisiado, otro que era enano, y además a un tipo llamado Humphrey Ocean… Usaba un nombre falso, pero era pintor artístico. No era músico, realmente, más que nada se ponía a bailar en el escenario. Pero eran muy buenos, y las canciones eran muy originales. Ian era un performer increíble, y además increíblemente carismático. Y también era lisiado. Había tenido poliomielitis, y terminó con una de las piernas completamente jodida. Pero era completamente único. Finalmente consiguieron un contrato discográfico e hicieron un álbum, pero no anduvo bien, así que Ian me dijo “soy demasiado pobre, deberías volver a los Estados Unidos, la situación no es buena”. Pienso que además seguía teniendo una aventura con su novia anterior a mí, Denise Roudette, que también hacía música, y que era una mujer muy hermosa.
03
Lo que para Ud. habrá significado otra verdadera buena razón para volver a casa.
Bueno, lo desconocía, pero lo sospechaba, y no quería tener un novio que me engañase. Y ya sabés cómo es, “tenés que odiar a la novia”, y ella me odiaba. Y una vez que me fui, se llevó mi tapado de piel. Pero es una mujer espiritualmente bellísima, y tengo gran respeto por ella. Creo que en cierto momento también formó parte de los Kilburns. Así que me fui a New York.  No conocía absolutamente a nadie allí. Tenía un amigo al que recordaba vagamente, y que se había mudado de San Francisco, pero al mismo tiempo tenía una lista de nombres que me habían dado mis amigos de Londres, tipo “soy amiga de Ian Dury”, y entre ellos hubo una mujer que me dijo “sí, venite y viví conmigo”. Tenía un loft muy grande en la calle Church. Esto fue en 1974. Pero todo el mundo me ayudó muchísimo. Y entonces me puse a trabajar, y gané algo de  dinero.  Mi primer empleo en New York fue como niñera, ya que eso te daba un lugar donde vivir, además de un salario, pero era part-time. Pero también había otro tipo, de los que estaban en la lista de contactos que me habían dado mis amigos, que estaba en el negocio de la música. Era plomo de bandas. Trabajaba en luces y sonido pare los Stones, y para otras bandas grandes. Era muy agradable. Me llevó a pasear por toda New York. Y una vez me dijo, “¿qué es lo que querés hacer?”. Y yo le contesté, “quiero ir a ver a los New York Dolls, porque nunca los vi”. Porque cuando tocaron en San Francisco, yo estaba en Londres. Y cuando tocaron en Londres, yo estaba en San Francisco. Y él se había encargado de hacerles sonido en New York, y los conocía muy bien. Y a la semana siguiente tocaban en un lugar que se llamaba Club 82, que era un club que alguna vez había sido propiedad de la mafia. Todos los que actuaban allí eran imitadores femeninos, lo que ahora se le dice “drag queens”. Esa era la historia del club, pero para cuando yo lo fui a conocer, ya era como una pequeña discoteca. Se había vuelto muy popular porque David Bowie solía ir de visita, y todo el mundo iba ahí por ese motivo. Todos los nuevos grupos tocaban ahí, y por supuesto también los New York Dolls. El lugar también tenía una pista de baile, por lo que todo el mundo podía ponerse a bailar después de ver a las bandas. Así que los Dolls fue la primera banda que vi en New York, y después del show mi amigo organizó una fiesta para los grupos en su loft, que estaba encima del club, a la que vinieron algunos de los miembros de los Dolls, y también los teloneros, un grupo llamado The Miamis, que si bien eran desconocidos, eran de mis favoritos por entonces.

02Sí, hace 2 años hicimos una entrevista con Gary Lachman (N. Valentine, el bajista original de Blondie) en Londres, y él mencionó a los Miamis.
Sí, eran de mis preferidos. Tenían cero imagen, eran solo un grupo de chicos judíos con el pelo enrulado. No tenían un look punk. Eran más pop que punk, pero eran muy buenos compositores de canciones, y tipos muy divertidos. Sus canciones tenían mucho sentido del humor, pero nunca fueron exitosos. En esa fiesta conocí a David Johansen (N. el vocalista de los New York Dolls), que estuvo muy simpático. Pero lo más gracioso fue que los Dolls nunca habían tocado antes ahí, y entonces dijeron “bueno, vamos a tocar en el Club 82, deberíamos ponernos vestidos de mujer”. Yo ya había escuchado los rumores sobre los maricas y todo eso, y entonces, en esa primera vez, David usó un vestido femenino de noche sin sujetadores, una peluca de mujer, y tacos altos, y yo me dije “oh, estos tipos son extraños”. Pero era lo que hacían, era una especie de broma. Creo que Johnny (Thunders) o Jerry (Nolan) dijeron “oh no, no pienso ponerme un vestido”. Porque eran realmente muy machos, no tenían nada de gay, sabés. La industria musical les tenía cierto miedo, por la tapa de su disco, en la que se los veía vestidos de mujer, y la gente no lo entendía. Había mucha homofobia, y demás.

Pareciera ser que ver a los Dolls en aquella época representó un antes y un después para todos los que formaban parte de la escena musical de New York de fines de los ’70. ¡Todo el mundo iba a ver a los New York Dolls!
Oh sí, eran muy grandes en New York. Mick Jagger y David Johansen se ponían a hablar en Max’s Kansas City, y la gente prefería prestarle atención a David. Eran más grandes que nada. Eran la banda más cool,  tenían las mejores novias, y nadie se veía tan bien. Más tarde el éxito de los Dolls se vendría a pique, pero todo el mundo podía darse cuenta que realmente la pasaban muy bien. Conseguían a todas las chicas y todas las drogas que querían, era divertido, y de eso se trata el rock and roll, por lo que todos se ponían a formar grupos.

04

Bayley, sobre los New York Dolls: “Eran la banda más cool,  tenían las mejores novias, y nadie se veía tan bien”

Y aparte tenían una gran imagen, algo que seguramente resultaba muy impactante por entonces.
Sí. Y ahí fue cuando Malcolm McLaren se puso a manejarlos. Los vistió con pantalones de cuero rojo, les puso la bandera comunista detrás, y demás. Pero los Dolls hacían shows increíbles, y tenían a bandas como Television de teloneros. Los grupos más nuevos, como Television, querían distinguirse del glitter rock, no iban a ponerse lápiz labial… Y así fue como Richard Hell creó muy específica e intencionalmente ese nuevo look del pelo corto. Nadie tenía el cabello corto. En el rock and roll, tenías que tener el pelo largo. Y usaban prendas rasgadas porque, sabés, se le rompía la ropa, y la arreglaban con alfileres de gancho. No era algo relativo a la moda, era algo práctico con lo cual vivir.

Y no es que tampoco alguien esperase a que se transforme en algo que se ponga de moda.
Bueno, de algún modo Richard pensó que, si querían que le presten atención, tenían que ser diferentes. Richard Hell diseñó esa remera que usaba Richard Lloyd en vivo con la frase “por favor mátenme”. De hecho Richard Lloyd intentó oxigenarse el pelo, pero lo quedó verde… (Risas)

05

Richard Hell, pionero del punk: “Estaba muy metido en el surrealismo”

¿Cómo era convivir con Richard Hell?
¿Con Richard? Extraño. No me dejaba regar las plantas de la casa, me decía “dejá que se muera, es supervivencia, no riegues las plantas”. Y también había un ratón en el departamento que yo quería sacarme de encima, pero él me decía “¡No! ¡El ratón vive!”

¿A qué se refiere? ¿Un ratón que vivía con Uds.? ¿En una pecera, o estaba suelto?
No, andaba suelto. Entonces lo maté, y lo tiré a la basura, y Richard me dijo “oh, ¿dónde está el ratón?” Nunca le dije que lo había matado. Vivíamos juntos, y así era las cosas. Éramos pobres, sabés. No era malo, ni agresivo. Richard estaba muy metido en el  surrealismo, gente como Lautreaumont o Baudelaire. Ahora es escritor, y por entonces ya era poeta.

Intentamos contactarlo recientemente para entrevistarlo.
No, él no habla de música, no quiere hacerlo. Es casi imposible lograr que hable de música. Y eso es algo que respeto porque, digámoslo así, yo siempre estoy haciendo todas estas entrevistas en las que siempre se me pregunta lo mismo, una y otra vez. “¿Cómo eran los años ’70?”, etc. Para él eso es algo extremadamente aburrido. No hizo nada de música desde los años ’80. Ahora es escritor. Publicó novelas, libros, artículos… Vive de ser un escritor respetado. Y entonces no quiere hablar sobre el punk rock. Lo entiendo completamente.

No es algo tan difícil de entender…
Mirá, antes de venir para Buenos Aires, hubo alguien que me entrevistó sobre Sid (Vicious) y Nancy (Spungen), ya que conocí a ambos. Y la primera pregunta fue, “¿Cómo fueron los años ’70?”. Y entonces le dije, “mirá, no voy a escribir esta nota para vos. Hay muchos libros y artículos escritos sobre eso. Vas a la biblioteca, y en 2 semanas me volvés a llamar y entonces me hacés alguna pregunta seria, porque no puedo relatarte la historia completa. ¡Ese es tu trabajo, el periodista sos vos!”. Esa era la filosofía de Richard, y lo comprendo. Cinco años atrás probablemente haya contestado a ese tipo de preguntas, pero ahora es como demasiado. Andá a la biblioteca, fijate en internet, está todo ahí. Y así me podés formular una pregunta relevante que muestre que tenés algo de conocimiento, y entonces no me vas a insultar. (Risas)

sidney-with-vicious

Bayley junto a Sid Vicious.

Espero que nuestras preguntas le resulten interesantes…
Sí, lo son, un poco suenan a que ya conocías cuáles iban a ser mis respuestas. Disfruto de las entrevistas, pero a veces te cansás de escuchar “¿Cómo fue el día en que sacó la foto de los Ramones?”

Volviendo atrás, ¿cómo fue que obtuvo el puesto en el CBGB’s?
Oh, eso fue porque yo era la novia de Richard Hell. Television era la única banda que solía tocar allí los domingos a la noche. Su manager, Terry Ork, un día me dijo “Roberta, quedate en la puerta y recaudá la plata, 2 dólares”. Y entonces cuando la gente entraba, les decía que tenían que pagar y que eran 2 dólares, que iban a ver una buena banda, y así era la negociación.

Hay una historia muy divertida respecto a eso con Legs McNeil.
Sí, vino al CBGB’s y me dijo “Soy Legs McNeil” (N. uno de los fundadores de la revista). Yo nunca había visto a la revista Punk, nadie la conocía. Era algo nuevo, acababa de salir el primer número. Y yo le dije “No, son 2 dólares, me tenés que pagar”. Y él me dijo, “No, entro gratis”. Y después yo le dije, “Bueno, ok, dame una copia de la revista”. Y Legs me dijo, “No, cuesta 50 centavos, detrás de la barra, ahñi podés comprarla”. Así que yo le dije, “Está bien, entrá sin pagar”. Así que fui hasta el bar, agarré 50 centavos, y compré la revista. Después del trabajo, fui a casa, leí la revista, y me dije, “Tengo que trabajar con estos tipos, ¡es increíble!”. No estaban seguros de mí. Pero entonces decidimos hacer algo juntos, que era como una fotonovela. Eso significó ir a diferentes clubs, y yo sacaba las fotos. Hicimos todas esas fotos y hubo muy buena química entre nosotros, y fue un momento muy divertido, nos divertimos mucho. Y entonces ellos me dijeron, “Bueno, ¿querés trabajar con nosotros?” Y de ahí en adelante, trabajé con ellos hasta el final de la revista.

¿Ya estaba trabajando de fotógrafa? ¿Qué la llevó a convertirse en fotógrafa antes de entrar en la escena musical?
Sí, eso pasó en 1976, y yo había empezado a fines de 1975. Me interesó la fotografía desde que era una nena. Tenía una cámara de juguete. Pero de repente la fotografía comenzó a hacerse popular entre la gente. Y cuando estuve en la secundaria, cuando tenía 15 años, tuve una clase de fotografía, que fue muy simple. Pero aprendí a revelar un rollo, y a cómo imprimir. Yo amaba la fotografía, y cuando me dieron el boletín con las notas, la mayoría fueron buenas calificaciones. A mi profesor de fotografía le gustaban mucho mis fotos, y me encargaba tareas, como la de tomar imágenes que tengan movimiento. Era profesor de historia, pero su pasión era la fotografía. Y entonces, cuando cumplí 19, me compré una cámara Nikon. En ese momento no sacaba fotos de música, pero hacía tomas callejeras. Por entonces la fotografía no era aún considerada una forma de arte, todavía era la oveja negra del mundo del arte. Pero entonces me fui a New York y conocí a todos los que estaban en la escena, como dije. El Club 82. Y yo trabajaba en el CBGB’s. Todo el mundo resultaba muy interesante, por lo que hubiera sido muy estúpido no hacer fotos.

¿Alguna razón en especial por la que la mayoría de sus fotos eran en blanco y negro?
Sí, fue algo decidido, porque no tenía dinero. Pero hice muchas fotos en color, siempre y cuando podía afrontar el gasto, o bien hacía ambas. Y especialmente cuando empecé a trabajar para Blondie. Pero el color es más caro. Aparte fui extremadamente afortunada de que poco después que me compré la cámara, un amigo me dijo, “tengo una cámara oscura que alguien dejó en mi departamento, te voy a dejar usarla por 6 meses”. ¡La cámara oscura entera, que era muy grande, con todo lo que necesitaba!

07

Pretty baby: Debbie Harry retratada por el lente de Roberta Bayley

Trabajó mucho junto a Blondie, que de todos modos eran un grupo muy colorido. Hubiera sido una gran pérdida haber fotografiado a Debbie Harry solamente en blanco y negro…
Sí, y fue lo mismo con los New York Dolls. Y pienso al respecto, porque siempre le digo a la gente que parte de la razón por la que la tapa de los Ramones (N. la del álbum debut) causó tanta impresión es porque fue en blanco y negro, pero también hay una tapa de New York Dolls que fue en black and white. Era inusual para las bandas de rock. La música folk tuvo muchas imágenes en blanco y negro, Bob Dylan también. Pero las bandas de rock usualmente usaban color. Elvis fue en blanco y negro, su primer álbum para RCA, el que The Clash copió. Yo hacía las dos cosas, tenía dos cámaras para poder tomar fotos en color y en blanco y negro. Pero la imagen de Ramones era en blanco y negro, ya que  era para la revista Punk. No podíamos permitirnos imprimir en color. La impresión era tan primitiva que no se podía mezclar el color y el blanco y negro en la misma página, lo cual ahora es muy común. Entonces, todo lo que fotografiaba para la revista Punk era en blanco y negro. Estúpidamente, Bob Gruen estuvo allí uno de los días en que hice fotos para Debbie, así que tiene las fotos de ella en color ya que él era rico y podía permitírselo (Risas). Quiero decir, él no era rico, pero era más rico que yo.

1

Una que sepamos todos: así retrató Bayley a los Ramones para la portada de su álbum debut.

¿Cuál o cuáles diría fueron los artistas más fáciles y los más difíciles con los que trabajó? Sé que amaba fotografiar a Iggy Pop. De hecho una vez declaró que deseó haberlo fotografiado mucho más.
Oh sí, es correcto. Y después me retiré. Pero siempre puedo llamarlo por teléfono (Risas). Hay una muy buena entrevista de él hecha por Anthony Bourdain, seguro que la podés encontrar en YouTube. Iggy es la persona más copada que existe, y esa conversación tuvo lugar en su casa en Florida.

Volviendo a la escena del punk, le voy a hacer una pregunta con truco. ¿Cuál de las 08dos escenas influenció a la otra? ¿La neoyorquina influyó a la inglesa, o cree que fue al revés?
¡Ahora me estás demostrando que sos ignorante! Perdón.

No hay problema.
La escena de New York comenzó en 1974. Y la de Londres en 1976. ¿Entonces quién influyó a quién? ¡Fue la de New York! Londres tomó todas las ideas de la neoyorquina. Los alfileres de gancho, las vestimentas rasgadas, y todo eso. Pero localmente, los ingleses fueron muy talentosos. Ya sabés, Glen Matlock, Steve Jones, Paul Cook

La pregunta que le hice no era en serio. Quise jugar un poco…
Pero es algo que no me creerías…Cuando hablo con periodistas estúpidos, siempre les digo “¡Andate, encargate de revisar la historia!”. Lo empezamos nosotros.

Entonces la pregunta indicada sería, ¿existe un enlace entre ambas escenas?
¡Por supuesto! ¡Malcolm McLaren! Ya sabés cómo fue, Blondie primero se hizo muy grande en Inglaterra, antes que en cualquier otro lugar, porque Debbie era muy hermosa, y se presentaron en Top of the Pops…Blondie tuvo muchos hits en Londres. Pero para cuando retornaron a New York, ya sabían que Johnny Rottten había copiado a Richard Hell, que era la versión de él. Johnny Rotten lo copió.

De algún modo la mayoría de la gente siempre creyó que lo del punk empezó con los Sex Pistols.
No hace falta que me lo expliques, soy yo quien te lo explico a vos, ¿ok? Es así como funciona.

09

Roberta Bayley y una de sus fotos de los Sex Pistols : “Los Pistols nunca fueron grandes en USA”

De acuerdo…
Los Sex Pistols se volvieron grandes en Londres porque dijeron “fuck” en TV. Ya sabés, su disco fue prohibido. Ni siquiera se permitía promoverlo, pero podías venderlo. Y entonces eran muy difundidos por la prensa. Por aquel entonces nadie conocía a los grupos de New York, excepto algunas personas.  Los Ramones eran todavía bastante oscuros, pero cuando fueron a Londres y tocaron en el Roundhouse el 4 de julio de 1976, en la audiencia estaban los Clash, los Pistols, etc. Ninguno de ellos tenía plata para las entradas, y Johnny Ramone se acercó a la ventanilla y los hizo pasar. Eran apenas chicos, pero los Ramones estaban muy al tanto de los fans, y de que iban a ser la futura nueva música. No creo que los Ramones se hayan sentido amenazados, pero pienso que se enojaron mucho cuando los Sex Pistols terminaron volviéndose más famosos que ellos más rápidamente. Pero, a decir verdad, no en los Estados Unidos. Los Sex Pistols nunca fueron grandes en USA. Pero Inglaterra es un país muy pequeño, y tenía tres periódicos musicales. Era un ambiente completamente distinto.

Y después ocurrió exactamente de la manera contraria cuando los Pistols hicieron su última gira en los EE.UU. ¿Qué nos puede decir de esa experiencia?
Eso fue realmente algo insano. Ya estaban hartos de todo, y Sid se estaba desintoxicando de la heroína. Como adicto a las drogas, se sentía pésimamente mal. Tuvimos esa idea de tocar en ciudades extrañas, ciudades oscuras en el sur como Memphis, Baton Rouge, San Antonio…Pero todo eso fue intencional.

No diría arriesgados, pero definitivamente eran lugares muy duros. La gente les arrojaba botellas…
Bueno, éramos punks, y nos la bancábamos… (Risas) Pero eso fue parte de todo lo que resultó frustrante para la banda, porque el grupo era realmente bueno. Me perdí los dos primeros shows del tour. Mi primer concierto de la gira fue el de San Antonio, donde la gente le tiraba todo tipo de cosas, y los insultaba. “Fuck you!”, y demás. Los trataban como si fueran freaks. Pero también había gente a los que les gustaban, si bien eran una minoría. Ya sabés, cuando vas al sur, Tulsa, Oklahoma…están todos esos tipos que son fanáticos de Jesús, que protestan, está eso de la “música del diablo”, y toda esa mierda. Así que los Pistols estaban frustrados y hartos de todo, y entonces Johnny dijo “suficiente”. Eso ocurrió en San Francisco.

¿Por qué cree que el interés en el punk se mantiene tan vigente después de todos estos años?
Es la última música underground. Ya no hay manera de ser así, te descubren inmediatamente. Te descubren antes de cualquier cosa, aún antes de que vayas al estudio y te pongas a tocar. Esa es mi opinión. Ya no sigo a la música. Fue como pasó en los años ’50, que fue la verdadera música punk, con gente como Little Richard. Nadie más punk. Elvis Presley. Nadie más punk. La gente dice, “oh, el punk fue la música más revolucionaria”. Oh no, eso fue el rock´n´roll de los ’50, y aún más, la música negra de esos tiempos. Y después de eso, los grupos de mediados de los años ’60, y también los grupos psicodélicos, que eran un tipo de música diferente.

IMG_3310De sólo ponerse a pensar en que Little Richard era negro, gay, que usaba lápiz de labios, y que movía el culo cuando tocaba el piano, ¡y en los años ’50!
Sí, y fue la mayor influencia de David Bowie, y también la primera. Pude escuchar a Little Richard porque mi hermana era 7 años mayor que yo. Aún siendo tan chica, escuché ‘Tutti Frutti’. Amaba a Little Richard. Y a Jerry Lee Lewis, otro punk.

¿Qué opina sobre la cultura neoyorquina? ¿Cree que hubo cambios importantes en los últimos años?
New York siempre será un centro cultural. Hoy en día se le hace muy difícil a los artistas vivir allí por su alto costo de vida. En los ’70 podías conseguir un loft, uno grande, por 200 dólares al mes.  Ahora eso cuesta 10.000. Para los más jóvenes que vienen a vivir a la ciudad, no sé cómo hacen.

Creo que es lo mismo que siempre ocurrió con las áreas más bohemias de las grandes ciudades. Como el barrio de Chelsea, en Londres. En los ’60 eran lugares en los que se podía vivir, y de repente llegaron las grandes compañías, o las grandes marcas de ropa, pusieron oficinas o locales, y se volvieron lugares carísimos y de moda.
Oh sí, igual que con el Soho de New York. Porque en ese entonces era un lugar muerto. Lo mismo pasó en Tribecca. Cualquier barrio que menciones. Probablemente sólo el Bronx sea todavía un lugar duro. Mi vecindario está demasiado habitado. Solía ser más sereno. Pero nunca salgo de noche, me importa un carajo.

10¿Cuánto hace que vive en el mismo sitio?
Casi 45 años, desde 1970. Es un departamento pequeño de 120 metros cuadrados. El edificio tiene siete pisos, y no hay ascensor. Así que cada día subo y los bajo, no tengo más remedio. Es eso, o dormir en el piso. No es ningún problema para mí, hace mucho que lo hago. Es algo muy saludable. Y algo más, en New York es ilegal tener siete pisos sin ascensor, los edificios tienen no más de seis. Por lo que tengo una vista increíble, y una luz hermosa, ya que no hay edificios cerca del mío. Eso es lo que me digo cada día cuando subo las escaleras, “¡tenés buena luz!” (Risas)

Respecto a  su muestra de fotos, ¿se siente como una artista mostrando sus trabajos, o más como testigo de una era? ¿Ya había visitado Buenos Aires?
Oh, ambas. No vi casi nada de aquí, excepto la galería, la galería, el hotel, la galería, el hotel, la galería … Pero lo voy a hacer. Me gustaría volver.

¿No se siente un poco rara viniendo hasta aquí para exhibir sus fotos?
¡Me siento maravillosa! No me siento rara. Es una sensación fantástica, estoy muy a gusto, es muy excitante. Siento un poco de eso en New York, y también cuando estuve en Tokyo. Viste cómo es, también son grandes fans de los Ramones y del punk rock. Ahí fue como si fuera una mini-celebridad, pero no tanto como aquí. No es algo que quiera hacer todos los días de mi vida, perdería la cabeza.

Entonces ésta es su primera vez aquí, ¿pero también la primera en Sudamérica? ¿Ni siquiera estuvo en Brasil?
Sí. Ni siquiera en Brasil.  Mi primera vez debajo del Ecuador.

¿Cuál cree que es el legado más grande del punk para el mundo?
Es la idea de “hacelo vos mismo”. No esperes a convertirte en un experto. Intentalo, equivocate, está todo bien. Si sentís ganas de hacer algo, no te sientes en tu cuarto a practicar guitarra durante 5 años, salí y tocá con tres cuerdas. Es todo lo que necesitás. Hacelo. Porque eso es lo que hicimos nosotros. Yo no sabía cómo hacer fotografías.

Una última pregunta, teniendo en cuenta que Ud. apareció en fotos recientes junto a su perro. Es como si de repente haya cambiado las fotos con punks a fotos con “pugs”.
Sí, los perros y los músicos no son nada diferentes.

HALLAZGOS: LEAN AL MISMÍSIMO CHUCK BERRY COMO CRÍTICO DE PUNK, POP Y NEW WAVE (!)

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 23 de septiembre de 2017

Corría 1980 y el fanzine estadounidense Jet Lag había logrado lo que para otros resultaba una misión prácticamente imposible: obtener una entrevista con Chuck Berry. Se sabe, el “Padre del Rock’n’Roll” no era lo que se dice suficientemente afecto a ser reporteado y, cuando lo aceptaba, tras meses (o incluso años) de ardua negociación y decenas de llamadas de teléfono, mayormente solía hacerlo si los interesados en hablar con él eran medios masivos, o revistas especializadas en música en las que podía despacharse a gusto sobre su carrera y exponer una vez más su talentosísimo ego… No, a Berry no le gustaban las entrevistas. Motivos no le faltaban. A través de los años, fueron más las preguntas que apuntaban a que hable sobre su vida privada (la que contaba con varias páginas escandalosas), la comidilla ideal para muchos editores hambrientos de historias de prensa amarilla que podían tentar a sus morbosos lectores.

2
Berry prefería hablar sobre sus canciones, o incluso deslizar alguna posición política, pero nada de siquiera referirse de lejos a los asuntos de índole personal que tanto protegía. Por eso no opuso resistencia alguna a la propuesta de los miembros de la hoy extinta publicación Jet Lag, quienes desde el vamos contaban con la ventaja de pertenecer a St. Louis, la ciudad que había dado luz al entrevistado, y que eventualmente permitió que el objetivo sea más sencillo de alcanzar.Para entonces Berry ya había declarado su interés en la nueva música que iba apareciendo durante aquellos días, por los que los encargados del fanzine -que fiel a sus tiempos era redactado y editado de manera casera en una máquina de escribir, y luego fotocopiado para su circulación- terminaron haciendo que se olvide por un rato de su terquedad histórica y, tal como había manifestado, no se niegue a la posibilidad de opinar sobre las nuevas bandas de punk, pop y new wave que por entonces sonaban en la radio.

3
Apenas un lustro antes, a mediados de los 70, hordas de chicos con camperas de cuero y cabellos parados aterrizaban en la escena pregonando eso de dejar en el pasado a todos esos artistas establecidos alguna vez reconocidos como auténticos rebeldes (“Peligro, extraño/ Mejor pintate la cara/ Nada de Elvis, Beatles o Rolling Stones/ En 1977”, cantaban los Clash en la cara B de su single debut), pero Berry, que falleció el pasado 18 de marzo a los dulces 90 años de edad, lo sabía mejor que cualquiera: el rock’n’roll primitivo y el punk tenían muchísimo en común, y si bien apenas unos pocos lo reconocieron sin titubeos -sobre todo en el caso de los Ramones– fue el personaje central de la entrevista quien se explayó abiertamente, y por momentos también de manera muy graciosa, sobre aquel paralelismo entre esa nueva música y su propio trabajo, al que prácticamente no haya músico surgido en los últimos 60 años que no le deba algo. A continuación, la traducción de sus conceptos sobre distintas bandas (cuyos nombres aparecen con varios errores en el fanzine) y sus canciones, allá lejos y hace 37 años, con música incluida para los aquejados de deficiencia etaria… ¡o simple mala memoria!

SEX PISTOLS – “God Save The Queen”
“¿Por qué está tan enojado este tipo? Las guitarras y la progresión de la canción son iguales a las de las mías. Buen ritmo de fondo. No puedo entender todo lo que canta. Si estás loco, al menos hacele saber a la gente que es lo que te está enloqueciendo””.

THE CLASH – “Complete Control”
“Suena parecida a la anterior. El ritmo y las guitarras hacen un buen trabajo juntas. ¿El cantante estaba con dolor de garganta cuando la grabó?”

RAMONES – “Sheena Is A Punk Rocker”
“Una buena canción movediza. Estos tipos me recuerdan a cuando empecé, yo también sabía solamente tres acordes”

THE ROMANTICS – “What I Like About You”
20-20 – “Oh Cheri” (sic)
THE BEAT – “Different Kind Of Girl”
“¡Al fin algo para bailar! Suena mucho a los 60, con algunos de mis riffs de guitarra. ¿Vos decís que esto es algo nuevo? Escuché cosas así muchísimas veces. No entiendo por qué tanto alboroto…”

THE GLADIATORS – “Sweet So Still” (sic)
TOOTS AND THE MAYTALS – “Funky Kingston”
SELECTOR (sic) – “On The Radio” (sic)
“Esto es bueno, muy suave y conmovedor. Muy bueno para arrastrar los pies. Suena bastante parecido a mi viejo camarada Bo Diddley, pero un poco más lento. Una vez intenté hacer algo similar en una canción llamada ‘Havana Moon’”

DAVE EDMUNDS – “Queen Of Hearts”
“Esto está mejor. Este tipo tiene un verdadero toque para el rock and roll, una onda que le sale de adentro. ¿Ha tenido éxito? Bueno, si alguna vez necesita trabajo yo podría utilizarlo”

TALKING HEADS – “Psyco Killer” (sic)
“Una canción divertida, sin dudas. Me encanta la parte de bajo. Buena mezcla, y buen ritmo. El cantante suena como si tuviera pánico de salir a escena”

WIRE – “I Am The Fly”
JOY DIVISION – “Unknown Pleasures”
“Así que a esto le dicen ‘nuevo material’…No es nada que no haya escuchado antes. Suena como una de esas viejas zapadas de blues que B.B. King y Muddy Waters hacían en el backstage del viejo anfiteatro de Chicago. Los instrumentos serán distintos, pero es el mismo experimento”

CONCIERTOS: HONEST JOHN PLAIN SE MOSTRÓ HONESTAMENTE ROCKERO EN EL SALÓN PUEYRREDÓN

Estándar

HONEST JOHN PLAIN AND THE PIBES – SALÓN PUEYRREDÓN, 13/ 5/ 2017

1

Y sí, HJ cada tanto tiene los blues. Y los oranges y los purples y los yellows también (Foto: ©Anitta Ramone)

“Qué lindo es el rock’n’roll”. Parece el título de una canción de uno de esos gruposde kermesse, o de un festival de baile o de un club barrial de los ’70 pero, así y todo, con el rigor del peso de la simplicidad que amerita, la frase soltada por uno de los asistentes que colmó el Salón Pueyrredón para ver aHonest John Plain el sábado pasado acaba siendo la mejor declaración de principios para un show que cumplió a rajatabla con lo que se esperaba. No importó el horario. Plain había largado su concierto promediando las 2 AM palermitanas del día siguiente (antes habían pasado por el escenario los teloneros She-Ra, Angel Voodoo, Los Mareados yStarpunks, quienes calentaron el terreno apropiadamente) y el clima que se respiraba desde el vamos presagiaba una velada que prometía resultar encantadora.

NEW OLD BOY. “The Boy Is Back”, anunciaba el póster del evento en el cual una de las figuras más prominentes de la escena del rock inglesa de mediados de los 70 y que las vueltas de la vida llevaron a titular como “punk”, algo que el mismo Plain no dudó en cuestionar en la entrevista que MADHOUSE le realizara días antes del show, y que pueden ver aquí. Con las primeras notas de “Never Listen to Rumours” (la única canción que hasta ahora vio la luz del álbum que HJP grabó junto a un seleccionado de estrellas hace unos años, y que sigue inédito), la banda dejó en claro de antemano que las 18 canciones que restaban iban a estar perfectamente a la altura de las circunstancias. La primera sorpresa del set llegó de la mano de “All The Way To Hell And Back” (que abría “Rock On Sessions”, el segundo álbum de los Crybabys), y que se mantuvo muy fiel a la versión original de estudio.

TEMA VA, TEMA VIENE, LOS MUCHACHOS SE ENTRETIENEN. Lo que siguió fue un repaso detallado por la extensa carrera de Plain, basada principalmente en el catálogo de The Boys, con “Monotony” y “Scrubber” del álbum “Boys Only”, 1980, a los que se les agregaron “U.S.I.”, el recordado hit “Brickfield Nights” y “T.C.P.” (las tres grabadas en “Alternative Chartbusters”, segundo disco de la banda), “Kamikaze” y “Terminal Love” de “To Hell With The Boys” (1979), y aún tres más del álbum debut de la banda de 1977 comandadas por “I Don’t Care” (primer single del grupo), “Sick On You” (que inauguraba el LP) y “First Time”, que fue parte de los bises, cerrando el concierto.

2

HJ rockeándola en el Salón junto a lo’ Pibe’ (©Gux Ramone)

Campera de cuero y lentes oscuros permanentes (que Plain sólo amagó sacarse cada vez que le dirigía unas palabras al público), el repertorio también incluyó el cover de M.O.T.O “I Hate My Fucking Job”, “Where Have All The Good Girls Gone” (canción/título del álbum inicial de los Crybabys), “New Guitar In Town” que grabara en su paso por The Lurkers,“That’s Not Love” de “Honest John Plain & Friends” (1996) y “Punk Rock Girl” de “Punk Rock Menopause”, el disco reunión de The Boys editado hace 3 años, a lo que se sumaría el inesperado anuncio de “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”, la canción de la pluma Jagger/Richard -a la que anunció como “y ahora una canción de los fuckin’ Rolling Stones”-originalmente incluida en el primer álbum stoniano, y que Plain registrara en estudios junto a The Mattless Boys, uno de los incontables proyectos en los que participó. Brian Jones estaría más que agradecido.

3VAMOS LOS PIBES. Y si una auténtica obra de arte no está solamente determinada por el lienzo, sino también por el marco, seguramente la performance general del show no hubiera resultado tan buena sin la presencia del trío que lo secundó en escena, que para la ocasión recibió el título de “The Pibes” y que formó conJuan Papponetti (ex-Katarro Vandaliko, ahora en Traje Desastre) en guitarra y coros,Arnold Rock (ex-Tukera, hoy enDoble Fuerza) en bajo y coros, y Alejo Porcellana (ex-Shaila, hoy en día en Mamushkas) a la batería, los mismos que lo acompañaron a lo largo de las dos jornadas previas a la presentación en el Salón Pueyrredón, que tuvieron lugar en Tandil y Mar Del Plata. Tres shows seguidos en tres ciudades distintas a lo largo de tres días no está nada mal, y con apenas alguna que otra señal de cansancio para el hombre que hace 2 años casi pierde la vida por un desliz del destino. Por el resto, fue una noche inolvidable con un recinto colmado y con el deseo en común de ver a una leyenda viviente del rock frente a sus narices. En estado de pura efervescencia, a la hora correcta, con el clima indicado, y con la promesa que indica que en noviembre retornará una vez más al país con -ahora sí, los más mayorcitos- The Boys. O con los pibes originales… Al menos para la ocasión, las noches de Brickfield cambiaron de nombre para convertirse en argentinas y más precisamente aún en la del pasado sábado en Buenos Aires. Que se repita todas las veces que sea posible, rock mediante.

AN INTERVIEW WITH HONEST JOHN PLAIN BEFORE HIS SHOW IN BUENOS AIRES: “MY BEST TIMES WERE WITH THE BOYS”

Estándar

Original article in Spanish published in Revista Madhouse on May 12 2017

Who’s the quirky guy in Texan shirt, a matching bandana and shades sitting at a table in the cafeteria of that hotel in downtown Buenos Aires at 3 pm?, the personnel of the place ask themselves, as they’re about to finish their days’ work. “Is he famous?”, one of them demand to know. “Let’s say he’s quite popular”, I try to explain, “but from a very particular elite”, all this while the man at the table, who’s now sporting a wide smile and a good disposition, is dividing his time between waiting for the next one to interview him, and wondering where is it that he left his room keys, who humbly confesses to have lost a few minutes before (“sorry, I’ll be right back”)

Lunch isn’t served anymore, while there are no drinks available either. Only water and coffee. Which is no problem at all to Honest John Plain, since the booze played hard on him a few years ago, leading him to leave it behind forever and ever after an accident that put his life at risk. Which may not be an easy task for a true Londoner always up for a drink at the pub, but yet Plain looks thankful and happier than ever. After all these years on the road he’s still is the restless rocker who plays all over the world and often keeps recording. And who’s now back in he country (his third visit in about 15 years) to do three shows, and also to remind us that he’ll always be the one he never stopped being.

Do you want to order a drink or something? Or a cup of coffee, maybe?
No, thank you. I haven’t had a beer or spirits for over 2 years now, because of my accident.

An accipunk-683x1024dent? What kind of accident was it?
I was in Norway playing with Casino (Casino Steel, ex-Hollywood Brats and also member of The Boys with Plain) We were in a mansion. I was on the fifth floor and there were marble stairs all the way down. I just got to go to the toilet, because I was drunk, and I fell down the whole of the stairs and smashed my head to pieces.

You fell down marble stairs?
Yeah. I got past the first two, and then fell again. And they found me in the morning. I was unconscious.

But you where there all alone? Nobody there to help you out?
Well, everybody was asleep, because it was during the night. I was with Casino but, when I went to bed, I needed to go to the toilet, and fell.

How come Casino didn’t notice it?
He found me in the morning, eight hours later, and there was blood all over the floor. And they put me in the hospital, and I only had 3% of brain left. And I nearly went, you know.

Did you injure only your head?
Yeah, I smashed it to pieces! (laughs)

Well, good to have you here, good to have you anywhere!
And I went on tour again after coming out of hospital. And then in Germany I went to hospital again for about 2 weeks, got out of that, started a tour again, finished off the tour and then I had another accident. You know, I kept on getting fits, so now they give me medication for it. And so far… (shows he’s still here)

Well, you survived. It could have been much worse.
Yeah I survived! But it was self-inflictive, I felt really bad when I was in hospital, with all these people that were really ill. And they did nothing. I felt bad ‘cause it was self-inflictive, because of being a drunk.

And who took care of you while you were there?
People in the hospital. My ex wife and my son came to see me when I was in London.

Another hospital in London?
I’ve been to hospital in Germany, in Norway…

It was a “hospital tour”, I mean, basically you’ve been touring hospitals…
(laughs) Yes,they had to give me medication while I was touring. So that’s why I stopped the beer and the spirits. I’m a pretty good guy now.

boys_1975

The original line-up of The Boys, from L. to R.: Andrew Matheson, Matt Dangerfield, Casino Steel and Wayne Manor, and Honest John Plain
below. Drummer Geir Waade not in the picture.

Are you living in London now?
Yes, in Belsize Park, Hampstead.

This is not your first time in Buenos Aires, you played here before…

Yeah, I played here with The Boys, but we’re coming back again in November.

That’s great to know! And after what you’ve gone through concerning the accident, it’s all like a miracle.
I love it!

You did four albums with The Boys between 1977 and 1980. And then, 34 years after that, in 2014, you put out a fourth album, “Punk Rock Menopause”. Why is it that the band waited 34 years to do a new album? And, by the way, your last solo album is called “Acoustic Menopause” So is there a menopause in rock’n’roll? I always believed it was made to keep you young…
Well, I didn’t come up with that title. My friend Jean Cataldo thought of it. I have no idea if there’s a menopause in rock’n’roll, I’m sorry. But I think it’s a great name.

Ok, and then why you waited 34 years for the fourth album by The Boys?
Probably Matt Dangerfield, the other guitarist in The Boys, who didn’t want to do it. He wrote most of the songs with Cas, you know. He probably was busy doing other stuff and didn’t want to do it, and I was with the Crybabys. It’s just happened because people asked us to do it, and it was great to do it again. I’m sure we’re gonna do a last one before it’s time to get in the coffin (laughs)

Why not two or three more?boys-punk-rock
Yeah, one more and we stay in.

You did a solo acoustic tour to promote your last album, and you did it all by yourself, as a one man band. Why you chose to do it like that?
Nobody wanted to be with me! (laughs) It was because the guy who was putting the shows on decided it was a good idea to do it that way, and it was fantastic because every show was full. You know, mostly Boys fans. But I did it to be on my own as well.

You always had a good base of fans.
Yeah, all over the place. Europe, the US, Argentina, Italy, China, Japan…

hjplain-menopThe Boys were labeled “the Beatles of Punk”. I know you’ve got a thing for the Beatles, don’t you?
Yeah, of course!

So since you toured solo, which Beatle would you have been? John, Paul…?
Any one of them. I think I’d rather be Ringo ‘cause he’s a funny guy, and I can play drums, you know. But I wouldn’t mind being John. I wouldn’t mind being Paul either, especially for his money, you know.

Are the Beatles your favourite band?
Yeah, I think the Beatles are my favourite band.

Everything you always did was about the ‘60s. So you’re here basically to take us back to that era!
Exactly! I was at the right age to appreciate that music.

So how old are you now, 62?
I’m 65. Yeah I’m and old guy, I’m on a pension now, punk rock pension! (laughs)

That’s a great name for a future album!
That’s what I’m gonna do! It’s my punk rock pension!

You were born in Leeds…
Yeah, and I still support Leeds as well, but they’re not doing very well.

Which reminds me of The Who’s classic “Live at Leeds” album.
Yeah, I was there!

At the very show of the album?
Yeah, I was in art school at the time. That’s how I met Matt Dangerfield of The Boys, I met him at the gig. I’ve known him for a long time.

You did lots of things as a musician. But my favourite one, and this is a personal thing, is what you did with The Crybabys, the EP and the three albums. So are you ever planning to get back together again?
It’s very strange you asked that because not long ago me and Darrell (N.: Bath, also member of The Crybabys) did a show together for the first time. That was in Brighton, ‘cause he lives there now. We just did an acoustic show, and so many people showed up.

Just the two of you, both on acoustic?
Darrell was on electric and I was on acoustic. Now we’re talking about doing another one, ‘cause it went down so well. When we are together, we really are good together. So it’s definitely gonna happen.

crybabys

The Crybabys, long ago and far away

What songs did you do at the show?
We played mostly of what you already know, and also some covers we like, you know. But the day before the show I was with Darrell at his place in Brighton, and we started writing again.

I’d really love another Crybabys album!
We’re gonna do one, that’s for sure. It’s time we did another one.

Plus Darrell doesn’t seem to have a steady band at the moment.
His best time is with the “Babys”, that’s for sure. I think he knows that as well. As far as I know, he’s one of the best guitarists all over the world, you know. And we fit together good.

It always appealed to me that you represented the Beatles bit in the band, while Darrell was always more Stones or Faces-styled. Would you agree with that? And if so, how did it happen?
I would agree with that, completely. I don’t know how that happened, I can’t even remember how I’d met him. I was probably very drunk at the time. But when we started playing together, we realized we had to do it. He’s a good lad.

He’s a very good friend.
Yes, absolutely. Not just the guy who plays guitar, you know, he’s family.

And looks like everybody loves him.
Yes he’s funny. We’re all funny! That’s how we carry on, you know.

I believe you recorded with The Dirty Strangers for their first self-titled album in 1988, but then you weren’t in the album.
Yes, I was in the album but I wasn’t credited, because The Boys started again. And they didn’t like that. So I got the sack, and then somebody replaced me. The album doesn’t say I’m playing on it, but I am. That’s when I met Ronnie Wood (N.: Wood was also in the album)

What’s the story behind that?
I think, that’s why Alan (N.: Clayton, guitar/vocals in The Dirty Strangers) worked for the Stones. I’ve got fond memories of Alan. Good singer, a great band, and he was fun. It’s just the end of it, which was a bit rough. I don’t even know if the band exists.

Oh yes they do! And they have a new album out last year called “Crime and a Woman”
That’s sounds like him! (laughs)

OK so what about meeting Ronnie Wood?
We were in the studio, I forgot what studio it was, a big studio in London, and I couldn’t believe it when Ronnie and his minder showed up, I wasn’t expecting that. And then Alan said to Ronnie “would you like to play in this song?” And Ronnie says “oh let me have a listen”…

Did you meet Keith Richards as well? He was also in the album.
Yes, but that’s when I went to pick up my guitar after I was given the sack, and he was there.

In 1995 you guested in Ian Hunter’s album “Dirty Laundry”, along with Darrell, Casino Steel, Glen Matlock, etc. Any memories of the recording of the album? Wasn’t it done at Abbey Road studios?
Oh, I like Ian! I watched football with him, and he was in his underpants, and without his shades on!

Ian Hunter without the shades? No way!
Yes, you shouldn’t look at that (laughs) No shades, and no trousers! God bless him, don’t get me wrong. That shows how much we got on, ‘cause he would never take his shades off for anybody. That was in Norway. No one believed me, but that was true!

What about the recording of “Dirty Laundry”?
It was fantastic going to Abbey Road, for a start. And you know Von, who plays drums in Die Toten Hosen, he was on the album as well. I had a bicycle with a basket, and me and Von would go show at Abbey Road on it! (laughs) Everybody else was arriving in limousines.

IMG_6831 (Large)

True Honest-y (pic by Marcelo Sonaglioni)

Not even two bikes, but the two of you in one bike, plus it’s a girl’s bike! Now that’s real rock’n’roll!
Yeah! (laughs) I think so.

What about your nickname? Other than you, the only other “Honest” I knew was, once again, Ronnie Wood, who they’d refer to as “Honest Ron Wood” in the ‘70s.
Because the Boys were gonna go on tour, and for some strange reason, I went to NEMS Records to pick up the cash for the tour, you know, to pay for everything, but I put the money on a horse!

Oh you were gambling. You bet on a horse!
Yeah yeah, a lot of money, for the whole tour. And the horse came second! I lost everything, so the manager at the time sent me back to get some more cash, and that’s why they call me “Honest”, ‘cause I’m not! (laughs)

What do you remember from the London punk scene in the ‘70s? Were there any rivalries between bands?
No, no rivalries, as far as I’m concerned. They might have had some but I didn’t. I remember the first day of Punk. The Boys were the first punk band to sign. And Mick Jones of The Clash used to rehearse at Matt Dangerfield’s place in Maida Vale, and I just remember the first day I opened the door there and Mick Jones had very long hair at the time, and then suddenly it went to a crooked cut, with strange clothes on. And I went “fuck it, what’s happening, mate?” And he goes “it’s Punk, innit?”

So that was the way you were introduced to Punk.
That’s how I was introduced to, ‘cause I’d never considered The Boys punk anyway. You know, we got that reputation but that’s how I found out what Punk was about.

Then why they’d consider you a punk band anyway? I mean, you were just a band who was very much into the ‘60s pop and rock music, and that’s it.
Yeah, I have no idea. But that’s how wee got to support the Ramones, because we were supposed to be punk. I’m not saying we were supposed to be punk, we played what we played.

And it was the same in New York at the time. It didn’t have a name. They called it “New York Rock” or whatever, and all of a sudden they started calling it “Punk Rock” and everybody was a punk.
Yeah, and that’s why I didn’t get involved with it.

In fact, I think that Punk never existed, you know what I mean.
Of course. You know, Johnny Rotten owns five fuckin’ hotels in New York. What’s punk about that?

You used to play drums in Generation X at the very beginning of the band.
Yes, they were rehearsing where I lived with Matt Dangerfield, and they didn’t have a drummer at the time. And Billy Idol was playing drums, but when I started to play, he started to sing. And I said “you know, Billy, you should be the fuckin’ vocalist”, ‘cause they were looking for a vocalist. I said “you sing great, so why don’t you sing?” And he went “let me think of that” And next thing I knew, he was up there.

You helped everybody!
It’s all down to me mate! (laughs) Why punk is so famous, it’s down to me!

london-ss

London SS, with Mick Jones (third from L.) with long hair and dark glasses

You’ve been in many bands throughout your career, staring with The Boys and the Crybabys, but also London SS, The Lurkers, the Mannish Boys, or Pete Stride. Which one gave you the best times, and which one gave you the worst ones, if any?
None of them gave me a worst time, that’s a fact, but the best time was with The Boys. Because when we are on the road, we have a laugh. I love Casino, I love Matt, I love Jack, and I love Duncan. We were a family, you know.

Why they disbanded in 1982?
I have no idea, I really can’t tell you. It wasn’t anything to do with me, you know. Today, I still don’t know why it disbanded. I know that Matt and Duncan fell out, but I still don’t know why.

5 years ago you recorded another of the “And Friends” albums with guests like Darrell, Die Toten Hosen, Glen Matlock, Martin Chambers and Sami Yaffa and Michael Monroe of Hanoi Rocks. How did you assemble the project and what happened to it, as I believe only the ‘Never Listen To Rumours’ video saw the light.
The album is finished now but for some reason the guy who was paid all this money to put it out  is not putting it out.  That would be my latest solo album.

It’s a bit confusing sometimes because there’s the ‘Honest John Plain and Friends’ album, the ‘Honest John Plain y Amigos’ one, then another one called ‘Honest John Plain and The Amigos’, and then the one you just mentioned, which wasn’t released yet.
Yes, and I don’t understand why the new one hasn’t been put out, as it’s fantastic, you know.

Rumoursbts.jpgoriginal

On the “Never Listen to Rumours” video

So how did you assemble the project?
I didn’t!

Oh you never do anything!
No, I never do anything. The guy that has put the money for it got in touch with everybody, and they all wanted to do it. If you see the ‘Never Listen To Rumours’ video, everybody there is on the album.

So once again, after you did the ‘Honest John Plain y Amigos’ album in Argentina in 2003, you released another one by Honest John Plain and The Amigos named “One More and We’re Staying” So you have a lot of “amigos” all over the world.
Yeah, I owe money to so many people, you know (laughs)

And you still have them around, because they’re going after the money…
Oh yeah, of course!

You were here in Buenos Aires 2003 to produce Katarro Vandalico’s album “Llegando al Límite”, and then came back again The Boys. Could you ever imagine in the ‘70s or ‘80s going to South America to play or to produce an album?
Of course not! It’s always been a shock how much I travelled, but it’s always because of The Boys.

hjplain-feat-2 (1)So what are your future plans now? Are you going back to London?
I’ve got to go back to London, but them I’m going to Norway again, as it’s the first Boys gig in a long time, a big festival in Oslo this month.

1-IMG_6832-1024x768

Honest John meets his interviewer (pic by Marcelo Sonaglioni)

Very much looking forward to The Boys’ comeback and, needless to say, it’s been great talking to you John.
Oh my pleasure too! And thanks for the questions, you’re definitely qualified!

 

CON HONEST JOHN PLAIN ANTES DE SU SHOW EN BUENOS AIRES: “MIS MEJORES MOMENTOS FUERON CON THE BOYS”

Estándar

¿Quién es ese señor de aspecto estrafalario, camisa tejana, bandana al tono y lentes negros que está sentado a una de las mesas de la cafetería de ese hotel céntrico de Buenos Aires a las 3 de la tarde?, se preguntan los miembros del personal del lugar, mientras terminan de hacer la limpieza del turno que acaba de finalizar. “¿Es famoso?”, insisten. “Digamos que es bastante conocido”, intento explicarles, “pero dentro de una elite muy particular”, termino apuntándoles, mientras el personaje en cuestión, de ancha sonrisa y benemérita disposición, divide su tiempo entre esperar al próximo periodista que lo va a entrevistar y preguntarse dónde dejó las llaves de la habitación en su versión tarjeta magnética, que humildemente confiesa haber perdido hace instantes (“disculpame, ya regreso”.

A esa hora de la tarde ya no sirven almuerzo, ni tampoco hay tragos disponibles. Sólo agua y café. Lo cual a Honest John Plain no le resulta inconveniente alguno desde que hace apenas unos años el alcohol le jugó una mala pasada, obligándolo a dejarlo para siempre tras originarle un accidente que lo tuvo más del lado de allá, que del de aquí. La situación no debe ser nada fácil para un auténtico londinense que pasó buena parte de su vida ahogándose en los pubs, pero Plain destila el ácido sentido del humor tan propio de su país de origen: está agradecido, a pesar de todo, y se lo ve más feliz que nunca. Después de todos estos años en la ruta sigue siendo aquel músico incansable que toca por todas partes del mundo y continúa grabando nuevos discos de forma inoxidable. Y que, claro, ahora está de vuelta en el país -su tercera visita en algo más de 15 años- para realizar tres shows y recordarnos que siempre, pero siempre, será el que nunca dejó de ser.

punk-683x1024¿Te gustaría beber algo? ¿O preferís un café?
No, gracias. No tomo ni cerveza ni ningún tipo de aperitivo desde hace más de dos años Eso es por el accidente que tuve.

¿Accidente? ¿Qué tipo de accidente?
Estaba en Noruega tocando con Casino (N.: Casino Steel, el ex Hollywood Brats y legendario camarada de Plain en The Boys). Estábamos en una mansión. Yo estaba en un quinto piso, y las escaleras eran de mármol. Tuve que ir al baño, porque estaba borracho, y caí por las escaleras y me rompí la cabeza en pedazos.

¡¿Te caíste rodando varios pisos por la escalera?!
Sí. Caí dos pisos y después seguí cayendo. Y me encontraron a la mañana. Estaba inconsciente.

¿Pero cómo? ¿Estabas solo? ¿No había nadie que pudiera ayudarte?
Bueno, todo el mundo estaba durmiendo, porque ocurrió de noche… Yo estaba con Casino, pero a la hora de ir a la cama, yo estaba con una chica y necesité ir al baño, y me caí.

¿Cómo puede ser que Casino no se diera cuenta?
Me encontró a la mañana, ocho horas después, y había sangre por todas partes. Y me llevaron al hospital, me quedaba el 3% de cerebro. Y casi que me voy, viste…

Te hiciste pedazos la cabeza.
Sí, ¡me la destrocé! (Risas)

En fin, ¡qué bueno que estés aquí después de todo eso! Quiero decir, ¡qué bueno que estés, donde fuera!
Una vez que salí del hospital, volví a salir de gira. Y después en Alemania me llevaron otra vez al hospital, por dos semanas. Salí, comencé otro tour, lo terminé, y después tuve otro accidente. Me siguen tratando, sabés, y me dan medicación por todo lo que ocurrió. Y por ahora… (hace el gesto de que aún está vivo)

Bueno, sobreviviste. Podría haber resultado mucho peor.
Sí, ¡sobreviví! Pero fue autoinfligido. Me sentí realmente mal mientras estuve en el hospital, con toda esa gente que estaba tan enferma. Y no hacían nada. Me sentí mal porque fue autoinfligido, por haber estado borracho.

¿Y quién te cuidó durante la internación?
La gente del hospital. Mi ex esposa y mi hijo venían a visitarme, cuando estaba en Londres.

¿Otro hospital en Londres?
Sí. Estuve en uno en Noruega, otro en Alemania…

Entonces básicamente hiciste una gira por los hospitales.
(Risas) Sí, y me tuvieron que medicar mientras hacía mi propio tour. Es por eso que paré con la cerveza y las bebidas alcohólicas. Ahora soy un chico bueno.

boys_1975

The Boys allá por 1975, con su formación original: de izq. a der., Andrew Matheson, Matt Dangerfield, Casino Steel y Wayne Manor. Honest John Plain es el que está sentado. Falta el batero Geir Waade.

MAYBE IT’S BECAUSE HE’S A LONDONER
¿Seguís viviendo en Londres?
Sí, en Belsize Park, en el área de Hampstead.

Esta no es tu primera vez en Buenos Aires, ya tocaste aquí.
Así es, ya vine con The Boys. Y vamos a volver en noviembre.

¡Gran noticia!
Después de lo del accidente, debés considerarlo un milagro…
¡Me encanta!

Entre 1977 y 1980 hiciste cuatro álbumes con The Boys y luego editaron otro disco, “Punk Rock Menopause” (“La Menopausia del Punk Rock”), apenas 34 años más tarde… ¿Cómo es que una banda espera tanto para lanzar un nuevo disco? Y, ya que estamos, tu ultimo álbum solista se titula “Acoustic Menopause” (“Menopausia Acústica”) ¿Creés que el rock’n’roll puede sufrir de menopausia? Siempre pensé que fue inventado para mantenerse joven.
Bueno, el título no se me ocurrió a mí. Mi amigo Jean Cataldo fue quien lo pensó. Perdón, no tengo idea si existe la menopausia en el rock’n’roll. Pero creo que es un gran nombre.
boys-punk-rock

OK, ¿pero entonces cómo es que tuvieron que esperar 34 años para hacer un nuevo álbum?
Probablemente fue por Matt Dangerfield, el otro guitarrista de The Boys, que no quería hacerlo. Él escribió la mayor parte de las canciones con Cas. Tal vez sea que estaba dedicándose a otras cosas y no quería hacerlo. Y yo, mientras tanto, estaba con los Crybabys. Se dio porque la gente nos pidió hacerlo y fue genial poder hacerlo de vuelta. Estoy seguro de que vamos a hacer un último disco antes que llegue el momento de meternos en el ataúd (Risas)

¿Por qué uno, y no dos o tres más?
Sí, uno más y ya está.
hjplain-menop
Hiciste una gira solista en formato acústico para promocionar “Acoustic Menopause”, pero la realizaste completamente solo, como si fuera una banda de un único miembro. ¿Por qué elegiste hacerlo así?
¡Nadie quería estar conmigo! (Risas) Fue porque el tipo que estaba organizando los shows decidió que hacerlo de esa manera iba a resultar una buena idea, y fue fantástico, porque en cada uno de los shows estuvo lleno de gente. Ya sabés, mayormente fans de The Boys. Pero también lo hice de esa forma para poder hacerlo por mi cuenta.

Siempre tuviste una base de fans.
Sí, por todas partes. Europa, Estados Unidos, Argentina, Italia, China, Japón…

JOHN, PAUL, GEORGE, RINGO Y OTRA VEZ JOHN
Los Boys fueron etiquetados en su momento como “los Beatles del Punk”. Sé que siempre tuviste algo fuerte con los Beatles, ¿no?
¡Sí, por supuesto!

Y entonces, en ese tour en solitario, ¿cuál de los cuatro hubieras sido? John, Paul…
Cualquiera de ellos. Creo que preferiría ser Ringo, porque es un tipo divertido, y también porque puedo tocar la batería, sabés. Pero no me molestaría ser John. Ni tampoco Paul, especialmente por el dinero que tiene.

¿Los considerarías tu banda favorita?
Sí, pienso que los Beatles son mi grupo preferido.

Casi todo lo que siempre hiciste a lo largo de tu carrera tiene que ver con los 60s. Así que estás aquí para llevarnos de vuelta a esos años.
¡Exactamente! Tenía la edad precisa para apreciar toda esa música.

¿Ahora cuántos años tenés?
Tengo 65. Sí, soy un tipo grande. Y ahora estoy pensionado, ¡una pensión del punk rock! (Risas)

Ese sería un gran título para un futuro álbum…
¡Es lo que voy a hacer! ¡Mi pensión de punk rock!

Naciste en Leeds, ciudad que dio uno de los más clásicos álbumes de rock en vivo, como fue “Live At Leeds” de los Who.
Sí, y además todavía sigo al equipo de fútbol de Leeds, aunque no les está yendo bien. Y respecto al disco, sí, ¡estuve ahí!

¿En el show del día que se grabó el disco?
Sí. En aquel momento estaba en la escuela de arte. Y así fue como conocí a Matt Dangerfield de The Boys. Lo conocí en el show. Hace mucho tiempo que nos conocemos.

DE LOS BOYS A LOS BABYS
Hiciste muchísimas cosas como músico, pero mi parte favorita  -y esto es algo totalmente personal- son tus discos con los Crybabys. El EP, y después los tres álbumes, “Rock On Sessions”, “Daily Misery” y “What Kind Of Rock’n’Roll”. ¿Piensan volver a juntarse alguna vez?
Es muy curioso que me preguntes eso porque no hace tanto Darrell (N.: Bath, guitarrista de los Crybabys) y yo hicimos un show juntos por primera vez. Eso fue en Brighton, porque él ahora vive ahí. Hicimos un show acústico, y vino mucha gente.

Solamente ustedes dos, ambos en guitarra acústica…
No, Darrell en eléctrica, y yo en acústica. Ahora estamos pensando en hacer otro show, porque salió perfecto. Cuando nos juntamos, realmente somos muy buenos. Así que va a suceder, definitivamente.

crybabys

The Crybabys, allá lejos y hace tiempo

¿Hicieron sólo canciones del grupo?
Tocamos mayormente lo que te imaginarás, y también algunos covers que nos gustan. Pero el día antes del show estuve con Darrell en su casa de Brighton, y nos pusimos a componer nuevamente.

Realmente me encantaría que salga otro disco de los Crybabys…
Vamos a hacer uno, sin duda. ¡Es hora de que hagamos otro!

Y además ahora Darrell no está en ningún grupo fijo.
Su mejor momento es con los “Babys”, indudablemente. Y creo que él también lo sabe. Hasta donde yo sé, es uno de los mejores guitarristas del mundo. Y encajamos muy bien el uno con el otro.

Siempre tuve la impresión que vos aportabas la parte “Beatle” al sonido de la banda, y que Darrell hacía lo mismo con los Stones, o con los Faces. ¿Estás de acuerdo? Y de ser así, ¿cómo es qué eso sucedió?
Estaría de acuerdo, completamente. No sé cómo sucedió, no puedo siquiera recordar cómo lo conocí… Probablemente estaba muy borracho aquel día. Pero una vez que nos pusimos a tocar juntos, nos dimos cuenta de que teníamos que seguir haciéndolo. Es un buen tipo.

Y un muy buen amigo.
Sí, absolutamente. No es simplemente “el tipo que toca la guitarra”. Es más bien como si fuera de la familia.

Y por lo que sé, todo el mundo lo ama.
Sí, es muy divertido. ¡Todos nosotros lo somos! Y así es como seguimos adelante, sabés.

JOHN ERA UN ROLLING STONE
Tengo entendido que grabaste con los Dirty Strangers en su álbum debut de 1987, pero al final no apareciste en el disco.
Sí, estuve en el álbum, pero no aparecí en los créditos, porque The Boys se habían juntado de vuelta. Y eso no les gustó a los Dirty Strangers. Así que me echaron, y alguien me reemplazó. En los créditos del álbum no aparece que yo haya tocado, pero lo hice. Así fue como conocí a Ronnie Wood (N.: actualmente guitarrista de los Rolling Stones, que está como invitado en el disco)

THE_DIRTY_STRANGERS_THEDIRTYSTRANGERS-89066¿Como se dio esa oportunidad?
Creo que eso fue porque Alan Clayton(N.: voz y guitarrista de los Dirty Strangers) trabajaba para los Stones. Tengo gratos recuerdos de Alan. Buen cantante, y una gran banda. Aparte fue muy divertido. Sólo que el final fue un poco áspero. Ni siquiera sé si la banda existe hoy en día.

¡Sí que existen! De hecho tienen un nuevo disco que se editó el año pasado, “Crime And A Woman”
¡Eso suena como algo de Alan! (Risas)

OK, ¿y entonces que pasó con Ronnie Wood?
Estábamos en el estudio haciendo el álbum. No recuerdo qué estudio era, pero era uno muy grande, en Londres. Y no pude creer cuando Ronnie y su guardaespaldas aparecieron. ¡No me lo esperaba! Y entonces Alan le dijo a Ronnie, “¿te gustaría tocar en esta canción?

¿Y lo conociste a Keith Richards? Porque también participó del disco.
Sí, pero eso fue cuando fui a buscar mi guitarra después que me echaron, y Keith estaba ahí.

En 1995 apareciste como invitado del disco “Dirty Laundry” de Ian Hunter junto a Darrell, Casino Steel, Glen Matlock, y otros. ¿Algún recuerdo de esas sesiones? ¿Fue grabado en Abbey Road, verdad?
Oh, me encanta Ian. Me ponía a ver fútbol en la tele con él, y Ian estaba en calzoncillos, ¡y sin los lentes negros!

¿Ian Hunter sin los lentes negros? ¡Imposible!
Sí, no deberías ver eso… (Risas) ¡Sin lentes, y sin pantalones! Dios lo bendiga, no te confundas. Eso demuestra lo bien que nos llevábamos, porque nunca se saca los lentes ante nadie. Eso fue en Noruega. Nadie me cree, ¡pero es verdad!

Aún no me contestaste sobre las sesiones de grabación de “Dirty Laundry”…
Por empezar, fue fantástico ir a Abbey Road. Y sabés qué, Vom, el baterista de Die Toten Hosen (N.: recientementeentrevistado por MADHOUSE) también estuvo en el disco. Por aquel entonces yo tenía una de esas bicicletas con canasta, ¡y entonces íbamos juntos a Abbey Road en la bici! (risas) Todos los demás llegaban en limusinas.

O sea que ni siquiera iban en dos bicicletas, ¡sino que los dos iban en la misma! Y encima era una bicicleta para chicas. ¡A eso lo llamo rock’n’roll!
¡Sí! (Risas) Creo que es así.

UN PUNK DE LO MÁS HONESTO
¿Cuál es la historia de tu apodo? Fuera de vos, el otro “Honest” que conozco, al menos en el mundo de la música es, de vuelta, Ronnie Wood, a quien solían decirle “Honest Ron Wood” en los 70.
Eso fue porque The Boys estaba por salir de gira, y por alguna extraña razón fui a NEMS Records (N.: el sello para el cual grababa la banda por entonces) a buscar el dinero para el tour, para poder pagar todo lo que había que pagar, ¡pero lo aposté a un caballo!

IMG_6831 (Large)

Honest-idad pura: si no puso todas las cartas sobre la mesa, John puso al menos las manos (Foto: M. Sonaglioni)

¡Todo a un caballo!
Sí, sí, un montón de dinero, era para toda la gira. ¡Y el caballo salió segundo! Perdí todo, y el que era nuestro manager de aquel entonces me envió de vuelta a buscar más dinero… Y es por eso que me llaman “Honest”, ¡porque no lo soy! (Risas)

¿Qué recordás de la escena londinense del punk de los 70? ¿Realmente existía algún tipo de rivalidad entre las bandas?
No, ninguna rivalidad, hasta donde yo sé. Tal vez la tenían entre ellos, pero no en mi caso. Me acuerdo del primer día del punk. The Boys fue la primera banda punk en firmar contrato. Mick Jones, de The Clash, solía ensayar en la casa de Matt Dangerfield, en el barrio de Maida Vale, y recuerdo la primera vez que abrí la puerta y Mick, que por entonces tenía el pelo muy largo, de repente apareció con el cabello todo recortado y con ropa extraña. Y yo le dije “Carajo, ¿qué está pasando, amigo?” Y él me contestó “¡El punk! ¿O no?’”

Y así fue como te presentaron al punk.
Así fue la presentación, porque de hecho nunca había considerado a The Boys una banda punk. Sabés, nos hicieron esa reputación. Pero así fue como me enteré de qué se trataba eso del “Punk”.

¿Entonces cómo es que los consideraban punks? Quiero decir, al fin y al cabo eran una banda que hacía música rock y pop de los 60…
Sí. No tengo la menor idea. Pero de esa manera fuimos soportes de los Ramones, porque se suponía que éramos un grupo punk. No estoy diciendo que se supusiera que fuéramos punks. Tocábamos lo que tocábamos.

En New York sucedía exactamente lo mismo. No tenía un nombre. Lo llamaban “rock de New York”, o como fuera, y de repente le empezaron a decir “punk rock”, ¡y todo el mundo era punk!
Sí, y fue por ese motivo que no me involucré en todo eso.

De hecho, pienso que el punk realmente nunca existió. No sé si logro explicarme…
¡Por supuesto! Quiero decir, Johnny Rotten tiene cinco hoteles en New York. ¿Qué tiene eso de “punk”?

Incluso tocaste batería duante los primeros tiempos de Generation X.
Así es, ensayaban en el lugar en el que vivía con Matt Dangerfield, y en aquel entonces no tenían baterista fijo. Billy Idol la tocaba, a veces. Pero cuando me puse a tocarla yo, él comenzó a cantar. Y yo le dije “sabés, Billy, deberías ser el fuckin’cantante”. Porque estaban buscando un cantante para el grupo. Le dije, “Cantás muy bien, ¿por qué no te pones a cantar?” Y me contestó “Dejá que lo piense”… Y de repente, estaba ahí cantando.

¡Ayudaste a todo el mundo!
¡Yo fui el responsable, mate! El porqué de que el punk sea tan famoso, ¡es todo responsabilidad mía! (Risas)

london-ss

London SS: créase o no, Mick Jones es ese de pelo largo y anteojos negros

JOHN, EL AMIGO DE LOS AMIGOS
Pasaste por muchas bandas a lo largo de tu carrera, principalmente por The Boys y los Crybabys, pero también estuviste en London SS junto a Mick Jones de The Clash y Brian James de The Damned, The Lurkers, The Mannish Boys, o junto a Pete Stride. Y después están todos esos proyectos solistas… ¿Cuál de todas esas bandas te trae los mejores recuerdos, y cuál los peores, de existir alguno?
Ninguna me hizo pasar un mal momento, es un hecho, pero los mejores momentos fueron con The Boys. Porque cuando salimos a la ruta, nos divertimos como nadie. Adoro a Casino, adoro a Matt, adoro a Jack, y adoro a Duncan. Éramos como una familia.

¿Por qué motivo se separaron en 1982?
No tengo la menor idea, realmente no puedo decírtelo. No fue algo que tuviera que ver conmigo, sabés. Aún hoy en día no sé el porqué de la separación. Sé que Matt y Duncan se pelearon, pero todavía lo desconozco.

Rumoursbts.jpgoriginal

Sam Yaffa, Honest John, Michael Monroe: un verdadero tridente ofensivo rockero

Cinco años atrás grabaste otro de tus tantos discos junto a músicos amigos en el que, entre tantos, estuvieron Darrell, Die Toten Hosen, Glen Matlock, Martin Chambers de los Pretenders, y Sami Yaffa y Michael Monroe de Hanoi Rocks. ¿Cómo fue que armaste el proyecto y por qué es que todavía no vio la luz? Lo único que se conoce es el video de la canción “Never Listen To Rumours”…
Sí, el álbum está terminado, pero por alguna razón el tipo que puso todo ese dinero para hacerlo, no lo editó. Ese vendría a ser mi más reciente trabajo solista.

A veces puede resultar un poco confuso, porque está el álbum “Honest John Plain And Friends”, el de “Honest John Plain Y Amigos”, que hiciste en Argentina, otro de “Honest John Plain And The Amigos”, y después el que acabás de mencionar, que sigue inédito.
Sí, y no entiendo cómo es que el nuevo no fue lanzado, porque es fantástico, sabés.

OK, ¿y cómo ensamblaste el proyecto?
¡No fui yo!

¡Vos nunca hacés nada!
No, nunca hago nada (Risas). El tipo que puso la plata para el disco contactó a todos los músicos, y todos quisieron hacerlo. Si ves el video de “Never Listen To Rumours”, todos los que aparecen ahí están en el álbum.

Después que grabasteHonest John Plain Y Amigos” en Argentina en 2003, editaste otro como Honest John Plain And The Amigos titulado “One More And We’re Staying”. ¿Tenés muchos amigos dispersos por el mundo?
Sí, le debo dinero a tanta gente, sabés… (Risas)

Eso explica por qué todavía siguen siéndolo; supongo aún esperan que les pagues algún día.
Oh sí, ¡por supuesto! (Más risas)

hjplain-feat-2 (1)
MI BUENOS AIRES QUERIDO
Estuviste aquí en Buenos Aires en 2003 para producir el álbum “Llegando Al Límite”, de Katarro Vandáliko. ¿Te hubieras imaginado alguna vez en los 70 o en los 80 que vendrías a Sudamérica a tocar, o a trabajar con otra banda?
¡Claro que no! Me resulta llamativo todo lo que he viajado, pero es siempre más que nada por The Boys.

1-IMG_6832-1024x768

El autor de esta nota junto a Honest John Plain: todo es buena onda, amistad, vitrales y anteojos negros (Foto: M. Sonaglioni

¿Y ahora cuáles son tus próximos pasos tras los shows en Argentina? ¿Regresar a Londres?
Tengo que volver a Londres, sí, pero después regreso a Noruega ya que vamos a hacer un show con The Boys en Oslo el 20 de mayo y luego el 30 de junio vamos a tocar en un gran festival en la ciudad de Austvatn, el primero después de un largo tiempo.

Esperaremos entonces con ansias tu regreso al país con el grupo y, una vez más, me resultó maravilloso haberte conocido y poder charlar.
¡Oh, fue un placer para mí también! Y gracias por las preguntas, me gustó que hayas estado calificado para hacerlas.

LA COMEZÓN DEL CUADRAGÉSIMO AÑO: LANZAN UNA EDICIÓN DE LUJO DE “RAMONES”

Estándar

Publicado en Revista Madhouse el 7 de julio de 2016

A mediados de 1974, la escena social y política de los EE.UU. estaba signada por uno de los mayores hervideros de la historia del país. Un juzgado de instrucción de la ciudad de Washington había imputado a varios de los colaboradores del por entonces presidente Nixon, acusándolos de poner trabas a la investigación del escándalo que derivó en el caso Watergate, el mismo que llevaría al primer mandatario a la renuncia. Paralelamente al caos gubernamental que imperaba, la vida en las calles era distinta. Más precisamente en Nueva York, donde The Ramones, un cuarteto del distrito de Queens, daba sus primeros conciertos en el CBGB, Max’s Kansas City y en demás clubes céntricos de la ciudad.

La periodista Lisa Robinson los había ido a ver en una de aquellas oportunidades primerizas y terminó encantada. Calar tan hondo en quien era la editora principal de Hit Parader y Rock Scene, las dos revistas más representativas de la escena en ebullición que se estaba gestando (lejos de Rolling Stone, que ya empezaba a ser seducida por las mieles del mainstream), no resultaba poca cosa. Y no por casualidad Robinson decidió telefonear a Danny Fields, cuyo currículum incluía haber sido manager original de Iggy y los Stooges, con la premisa de convencerlo de manejar a esos rockeros desaliñados enfundados en jeans en estado terminal y camperas de cuero al tono que tanto le habían llamado la atención. Algo después, para cuando el persuadido Fields había tomado la decisión de comandar las actividades del grupo (seguramente Joey, Johnny, Dee Dee y Tommy no dudaron en aceptarlo tras ser informados de que su nuevo manager había trabajado con los MC5, Jim Morrison y Velvet Underground, entre otros), los “cuatro de Queens” ya habían dejado registro de un demo con dos canciones, “Judy Is A Punk” y “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend”, que terminó convenciendo a los directivos del sello independiente Sire Records, los mismos que luego contratarían a los Dead Boys y a los Talking Heads, por nombrar a algunos, y que años más tarde lanzarían la carrera de una tal Madonna que eventualmente acabó siendo su numerito más exitoso. El resto es historia.

Una semana inolvidable. En sólo siete días los Ramones registraron su disco debut en los estudios Plaza Sound de la Gran Manzana, ubicados en el séptimo piso del edificio que aloja al mítico Radio City Music Hall: un ataque relámpago de 14 canciones comprimidas en algo más de veintinueve minutos, y encabezadas (nunca mejor dicho) por “Blitzkrieg Bop”, que no sólo se convertiría en unos de los himnos sagrados básicos del punk, sino también en uno de las mejores canciones de apertura de cualquier álbum a través de la historia, paradójicamente, a pesar de sus orígenes basados en el pop puro. Johnny alguna vez declaró que la intención original era lograr el sonido bubblegum de “Saturday Night” de los Bay City Rollers, y Tommy acotó que el plan también debía incluir un cantito de batalla que se acercara al de la versión que los Stones habían hecho de “Walking The Dog” de Rufus Thomas en su primer álbum (en rigor, lo que marcó el génesis del grito de guerra del bendito “Hey Ho, Let’s Go!”). El arte de tapa del disco pretendió ser al comienzo un tributo directo a los Beatles inspirado en la portada de “Meet The Beatles!”, el segundo LP que los Fab Four lanzaron en EE.UU., pero en Sire no se dieron por conformes con el resultado (a pesar de los U$2000 invertidos, que representaba casi la tercera parte de los gastos de producción totales del álbum), por lo que tuvieron que salir a buscar una nueva alternativa, que terminaron encontrando en una toma de Roberta Bailey, fotógrafa del legendario fanzine Punk. El rock no volvería a ser el mismo desde aquel 23 de abril de 1976, cuando “Ramones” llegó a las bateas para dejar en claro que nadie sonaba como sus mentores.

Cuatro décadas no es nada. A poco más de 40 años de la edición de una de las piezas maestras definitivas del punk –si no la más representativa de todas-, el sello Rhino celebra el aniversario con el lanzamiento de una edición de lujo conteniendo 3 CDs y 1 LP que incluyen mezclas en mono y en estéreo del álbum, a lo que se agregan algunas rarezas, demos inéditos y tomas en vivo. El primer disco que compone “Ramones: 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition”, que verá la luz el próximo 29 de julio (a U$64,98 si lo pre-ordenan en la web del grupo), presenta la versión recientemente remasterizada, a lo que se suma una nueva mezcla con sonido completamente monoaural, tarea supervisada por Craig Leon, productor original del LP. “Las mezclas iniciales del álbum fueron virtualmente en mono”, declaró Leon. “Teníamos la idea de grabarlo en Abbey Road y hacer simultáneamente versiones en mono y en estéreo, algo que por aquel momento resultaba inédito. Estoy fascinado con eso de que ahora, 40 años más tarde, pudimos continuar con la idea inicial”.
El segundo disco, por su parte, se titula “Single Mixes, Outtakes, and Demos”, e incluye un total de 18 pistas, entre las cuales aparecen los demos originales de clásicos como “53rd & 3rd”, “Loudmouth”, “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend”, “Today Your Love, Tomorrow the World” y “Chain Saw”. El tercero muestra a la banda en vivo en estado puro en dos sets registrados el 12 de agosto de 1976 en el club The Roxy de West Hollywood, California (de los cuales el último permanecía totalmente inédito hasta la fecha) Todo coronado por el agregado de la única pieza de vinilo que se incluye en el lujoso lanzamiento (que contará exclusivamente con una edición limitada numerada de un total de 19.760 copias, claramente en alusión al año de la edición de “Ramones”), más la totalidad de la mezcla de los 40 años del álbum original. Los cuatro discos son presentados empaquetados dentro de un libro de tapa dura de 12 por 12 pulgadas, más el agregado de una serie de notas de producción a cargo del mencionado Leon, un ensayo de manos del periodista Mitchell Cohen y algunas fotos de Bailey.
Uno de los trabajos más celebrados de la historia de la música cumple cuatro décadas, el mismo que le dio el puntapié inicial a una camarilla de cuatro desaliñados glamorosos que acabarían trepándose al selecto podio de los artistas más fundamentales e influyentes de la historia de la música popular. ¡Gabba gabba hey!

Disco 1: Original Album & Stereo Version 40th Anniversary Mono Mix
1. “Blitzkrieg Bop”/ 2. “Beat On The Brat”/ 3. “Judy Is A Punk”/ 4. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend”/ 5. “Chain Saw”/ 6. “Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue”/ 7. “I Don’t Wanna Go Down To The Basement”/ 8. “Loudmouth”/ 9. “Havana Affair”/ 10. “Listen To My Heart”/ 11. “53rd & 3rd”/ 12. “Let’s Dance”/ 13. “I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You”/ 14. “Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World”/ 15. “Blitzkrieg Bop”*/ 16. “Beat On The Brat”*/ 17. “Judy Is A Punk”*/ 18. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend”*/ 19. “Chain Saw”*/ 20. “Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue”*/ 21. “I Don’t Wanna Go Down To The Basement”*/ 22. “Loudmouth”*/ 23. “Havana Affair”*/ 24. “Listen To My Heart”*/ 25. “53rd & 3rd”*/ 26. “Let’s Dance”*/ 27. “I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You”*/ 28. “Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World”*
*Versión en estéreo

Disco 2: Single Mixes, Outtakes, and Demos
1. “Blitzkrieg Bop” (Original Stereo Single Version)/ 2. “Blitzkrieg Bop” (Original Mono Single Version)/ 3. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend” (Original Stereo Single Version)/ 4. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend” (Original Mono Single Version)/ 5. “Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World” (Original Uncensored Vocals)*/ 6. “I Don’t Care” (Demo)/ 7. “53rd & 3rd” (Demo)*/ 8. “Loudmouth” (Demo)*/ 9. “Chain Saw” (Demo)*/ 10. “You Never Should Have Opened That Door” (Demo)/ 11. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend” (Demo)*/ 12. “I Can’t Be” (Demo)/ 13. “Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World” (Demo)*/ 14. “I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You” (Demo)*/ 15. “Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue” (Demo)/ 16. “I Don’t Wanna Be Learned/I Don’t Wanna Be Tamed” (Demo)/ 17. “You’re Gonna Kill That Girl” (Demo)*/ 18. “What’s Your Name” (Demo)
Disco 3: Live at The Roxy (8/12/76)

Set One
1. “Loudmouth”/ 2. “Beat On The Brat”/ 3. “Blitzkrieg Bop”/ 4. “I Remember You”/ 5. “Glad To See You Go”/ 6. “Chain Saw”/ 7. “53rd & 3rd”/ 8. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend”/ 9. “Havana Affair”/ 10. “Listen To My Heart”/ 11. “California Sun”/ 12. “Judy Is A Punk”/ 13. “I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You”/ 14. “Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World”/ 15. “Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue”/ 16. “Let’s Dance”

Set Two
1. “Loudmouth”*/ 2. “Beat On The Brat”*/ 3. “Blitzkrieg Bop”*/ 4. “I Remember You”*/ 5. “Glad To See You Go”*/ 6. “Chain Saw”*/ 7. “53rd & 3rd”*/ 8. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend”*/ 9. “Havana Affair”*/ 10. “Listen To My Heart”*/ 11. “California Sun”*/ 12. “Judy Is A Punk”*/ 13. “I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You”*/ 14. “Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World”*/ 15. “Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue”*/ 16. “Let’s Dance”*

40th Anniversary Mono Mix
1. “Blitzkrieg Bop”*/ 2. “Beat On The Brat”*/ 3. “Judy Is A Punk”*/ 4. “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend”*/ 5. “Chain Saw”*/ 6. “Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue”*/ 7. “I Don’t Wanna Go Down To The Basement”*/ 8. “Loudmouth”*/ 9. “Havana Affair”*/ 10. “Listen To My Heart”*/ 11. “53rd & 3rd”*/ 12. “Let’s Dance”*/ 13. “I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You”*/ 14. “Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World”*
(* Previamente no editadas)